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First TROS March Accolyte

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First TROS March Accolyte last won the day on November 28

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About First TROS March Accolyte

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  • Birthday January 17

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  1. 1917 (FYC) by Thomas Newman The track Night Window sounds like... Rivendell. Could have even been temp-tracked with it. Definitely worth hearing. The rest is rather bland. Sounds competent, and likely serves it's film decently, but invites neither interest, nor care, nor any emotion. Generic music of it's decade.
  2. Duel of the Fates has been composed for a fast paced fight where a double-bladed lightsaber faces two combatants, and the characters have a lot of feet movement as well. In a fight between Rey and Kylo the strikes will be maybe 30% as frequent, and the characters are unlikely to run and jump as much. I wonder how did Williams tackle this.
  3. This happened back in June, but since nobody seems to have mentioned it, I decided to highlight this: https://www.polarmusicprize.org/laureates/anne-sophie-mutter/ She did not mention him in her acceptance speech, but the highlighted parts from the website and the timing of her receiving the prize do suggest that the recent collaboration with Williams did amount to at least a bit of this audacity and boundary-breaking in her image. She likely thinks so, judging by the first paragraph of the article on her own webpage. https://www.anne-sophie-mutter.de/en/news/anne-sophie-mutter-von-schwedischem-k├Ânig-mit-dem-polar-music-prize-ausgezeichnet/ Promotion is one reason to be sure, but I think it is at least worth a mention on JWFan that Williams had something to do with it. Worth a sentence in any book written by our passionate JW biographers.
  4. I thought it's a generic commercial song. Like those in Dreamworks' Over the Hedge. The most brilliant piece of soundtrack written this decade to me is The March of the Resistance. The lyricism, flamboyance, and details of evocative musical thought behind it keep surprising me even after 4 years. Arguably I could see it tied with Rey's Theme, if the latter is indeed based on the 5-tone pattern from CE3K.
  5. If he composed for 25 films in 1971, 60 minutes on average for each of them (am I being generous?), the result would be 1500 minutes of music over 365 days---which is just about 4 minutes a day. I wouldn't say it's that much different from the speed of composition of the top TV composers back in the 1950s-1970s.
  6. The Return of the King - Howard Shore (2003) The Rise of Skywalker - John Williams (2019) Dinosaur - James Newton Howard (2000) Mummy Returns - Alan Silvestri (2002) Pirates of Caribbean: At World's End - Hans Zimmer (2007) The Incredibles - Michael Giacchino (2004) La La Land - Justin Hurwitz (2016) Time Machine - Klaus Badelt (2002) Mr. Bean's Holiday - Howard Goodall (2007)
  7. I am skeptical whether it's a new recording. Sounds same as the old one to me, beneath all those effects. Thanks to Solo, Asteroid Field feels so cheap now. I hope Williams wrote something new for those chase scenes instead.
  8. I estimated the maximum accuracy of the Best Score / Best Dramatic Score Oscars so far. Maximum, because there might exist some better yet not awarded scores also in the years where nothing came to my mind / I didn't know of any. Can't bother with more accurate maths or more detailed presentation: 3:3 (1933-1939) =< 50% 5:5 (1940-1949) =< 50% 3:7 (1950-1959) =< 30% 3:7 (1960-1969) =< 30% 3:7 (1970-1979) =< 30% 1:9 (1980-1989) =< 10% 3:7 (1990-1999) =< 30% 3:7 (2000-2009) =< 30% 2:6 (2010-2018) =< 25% 26/84 ~ 31 [%] To quote Toscanini: "You have no ears, and no eyes. Nothing at all". If this decade were to uphold the typical standards of 30%, TROS would have to win. The last time Williams was so dominating as this decade, however, the accuracy was at an all-time low. So anything goes!
  9. The God of Film Music to quote a statement about him with which he agreed back in 2002
  10. I don't understand the argument about the rhytm being something Williams would not do. The Grievous piece above? Mine Car Chase? Tie Fighter Attack? Whenever a chase really gets distressed and serious, and not quite lyrical, this is precisely what Williams does! Hear here [3:32]:
  11. "Which part of "all dead" is unclear to you?"---asked Steven Sp., looking inside the trunk of his car. <A couple of mumbles sounded from under the gags.> "What do you think about those fish, Johnny?"---he turned to a menacing character standing next to him. John Towner Williams, alias "Johnny" simply exhaled a cigar smoke at the victims, and grinned maliciously.
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