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Tom Guernsey

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  1. Haha
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Tallguy in Michael Giacchino's SPIDER-MAN: NO WAY HOME (2021)   
    It was renamed to "Peter Briefs" to avoid spoilers. (Also a plausible Gia title.)
  2. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to May the Force be with You in What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)   
    Superman (LLL) by John Williams
    Simply the greatest super-hero score of all time and one of the best Williams.
    The LLL presentation is almost perfect (some of Williams materials have been left on the boxset of the two sequels). I really think that MM did a perfect restauration of this score, can't believe it was recorded more than 40 years ago...
  3. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Edmilson in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    Hollow Man (2000)
     
    Silly but somewhat entertaining thriller about an arrogant scientist who becomes invisible. Goldsmith's score is pretty good. 
  4. Haha
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Tallguy in Michael Giacchino's SPIDER-MAN: NO WAY HOME (2021)   
    Tobey's Noble End.
  5. Like
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from May the Force be with You in What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)   
    Dennis the Menace (Jerry Goldsmith) - my nephew is a massive Dennis the Menace fan, but the UK version (with Gnasher!) rather than the American comic, which were both (unbelievably) debuted on the same day. In the history of unlikely coincidences, that has to be perhaps one of the most unlikely. I think this can be added to the several projects where he ended up scoring movies that were made to cash in on a more high profile film that JW scored* namely Home Alone  but the discussion about the coincidental release of the comics reminded me to give Jerry's charming score a listen. From the composer of Planet of the Apes... it's Dennis the Menace. It might be a score for a throwaway kids movie but it's a lot of fun, with a memorable harmonica led main theme, a nicely understated piano theme and some expertly executed Mickey Mousing action scoring sure to delight anyone who enjoys his Joe Dante scores. I'm sure I'm not alone in wishing Jerry had scored some more highly regarded films with high profile directors more befitting his immense talents, but even on something this dire, he still gave it his all. Lovely stuff.
     
    *to add to Raiders/King Solomon's Mines, Superman/Supergirl, Jurassic Park/Congo, and, arguably Star Wars/Star Trek, The Swarm/Other Irwin Allen Movies etc.
  6. Like
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from Sweeping Strings in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    I wonder who thought "yeah... Klingons... they seem like a pink blooded species...". I guess it does show up quite dramatically inside the darkness of the ship so it's pretty effective.
  7. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to DarthDementous in The Book of Boba Fett SHOW Discussion   
    It’s a nice idea on paper, but The Mandalorian and Book of Boba Fett differ way too much from the respective EU to possibly fit in. Just because it hasn’t touched heavily on Sequel Trilogy elements doesn’t mean it’s compatible, it functionally exists in a completely different universe.
     
    If it was a part of the Legends timeline then The Mandalorian would be taking place whilst Grand Admiral Thrawn is launching his massive campaign to crush the New Republic and the galaxy would be in a period of war, which is not reflected in the slightest in the show.

    World-building is a huge thing to me as well, but the world presented in Book of Boba Fett is incoherent and vague.
     
    Why do none of the big players in Mos Espa have any security in their buildings to prevent people just waltzing in with guns? How did Jabba’s criminal empire actually function and what happened to all the previous patrons under Bib Fortuna? Jabba’s palace is so empty and lifeless under Boba and it seems like he literally only has two guards and now a pack of swoopers. Why wouldn’t his first order of business be recruitment on a larger scale? Does he even have access to any money?

    Why do the Pykes run a train of spice through the desert, why not use a spice freighter so you don’t have to worry about local interference at all?
     
    I don’t get a sense for how literally any faction functions and it makes it very hard to get invested in the world as a result.
  8. Like
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from MrJosh in Roger Feigelson announces a Williams title is coming from Intrada in 2022   
    Seven Years in Tibet would be great as the original album is oddly muddy sounding - it's all middle and not much else (a bit like the old TLW album). Any of the Oliver Stones would indeed be good, although I'd go for JFK over the others as, again, the sound isn't great.
  9. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Naïve Old Fart in Your favourite Bond songs, that aren't Bond songs but sound like Bond songs   
    Of course they were.
    Arnold >>>>>>>>>>> Zimmer. I mean...what a comedown.
  10. Haha
    Tom Guernsey reacted to bollemanneke in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    In Bruges.
     
    Let’s go up the bell tower. That was one of the fucking random bits and pieces I remembered from this fucking film when we watched it fucking ages ago. Brendan Gleeson is amazing. I also mostly liked the humour, but did think they were sometimes taking things too far, especially when Gleeson just wouldn’t die: I was feeling compassion for his character while laughing at the absurdity of it all and I didn’t really like that because I just wanted to mourn his death. The two Belgians were portrayed very accurately as emotionless, fucking cunts and I will also remember that a little person can also be called a person of restricted growth (where do they keep getting these words?) I didn’t really like Clémense POésy’s character and why are there so many French accents in this movie anyway? It’s set in fucking Bruges, not fucking France. Also hadn’t recognised Ralph Fiennes at first and thought his character was played by Ciarán Hinds. Also my first time in which Colin Farrell isn’t boring, but mostly good.
    I was going to write the score was fucking functional, but then the fucking romance cues came. And the source music. I’m watching a lot of Carter Burwell movies lately and keep wondering how that fucking prick got attached to fucking Twilight. Waste of his fucking time.
  11. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to GerateWohl in The Book of Boba Fett SHOW Discussion   
    But more Americal Graffiti than Star Wars.
  12. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Sweeping Strings in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    Yep, back then wasn't Trek's/most of sci-fi's go-to alien blood colour green (or black)? 

    Hence McCoy's brilliant 'That green-blooded son of a bitch ... it's his revenge for all those arguments he lost!' in The Search For Spock.    
  13. Like
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from Sweeping Strings in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    Yes, fair point. Plus the Praxis explosion effect which was novel at the time I believe. Weird how Star Trek films generally had fairly tight budgets but often managed to include one or two novel visual effects (the Genesis Planet rendering in TWOK, for example).  Funny how phasers never made anyone else bleed like that anywhere else nor was Klingon blood ever pink again!
  14. Surprised
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from bruce marshall in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    Middle one 😜
  15. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to The Illustrious Jerry in Ludwig Göransson & Joseph Shirley's THE BOOK OF BOBA FETT (2021)   
    I wasn't as impressed with most of the music in this episode, but that choral cue is indeed one of the highlights of the score thus far. I think the flashbacks have easily been the most interesting part of the show up to this point and Shirley's work absolutely reflects that. Most of the stuff in the present timeline has been lacking inspiration, at least to my ears.
     
    I'm really looking forward to hearing the first album next week though. The ratio of stuff I want to hear compared to the stuff I've already forgotten is certainly a lot different than it's ever been with Mando, but I trust that the release will include all of the more obvious standout cues we've pointed out. Looking forward!
     
    Here's what I heard in this latest chapter...
     

     
    Boba's Domain - A very low-key cue opens the episode under a dialogue scene. Strings, electronics, and short pizzicato passages are present.
     
    Mos Espa at Night - The brass excerpt from the post-credits scene teaser returns over a wide shot of the city, with the S2 Boba theme bumping beneath. The cue dies out beneath some source music.
     
    New Recruits - Some slight tension dies down before light pizzicato takes over. The S2 Boba theme appears with the horn bit again, before transitioning into the main title shanty (with more pronounced tambourine this time, I think).
     
    Back to Bacta / Kamino / Raided Camp - Maybe I wasn't listening close enough but I don't think there were any breaks in the music for this lengthy flashback sequence. There are some emotional strings and noble horns that play for the glimpses of Kamino, with the main section of Ludwig's piece finally being integrated into the score proper. It's a really cool moment! There's some quiet atmosphere as Boba visits the Pykes, and then the ending features that excellent choral lament that I had mentioned. This had better be on the first volume!
     
    Wookiee Attack - Aleatoric strings and some of the organic noises that followed Boba around in Mando S2. 
     
    The Twins' Gift - Cautious strains of Boba's S2 theme, followed by some pizzicato. There's some percussion that accompanies the rancor in its den. 
     
    Bonding with the Rancor - Mostly atmospheric with some synths and processed winds.
     
    Back to the Mayor's - Boba's S2 theme and the horn bit appear again in this very brief transition cue.
     
    Majordomo's Escape - A mish-mash of electronics with some horns and strings. Not at all notable, sorry to say.
     
    Pykes Arrive - Some distorted vocals, strings, and foreboding thumping. Not a very interesting tease at what's to come by any means.
  16. Thanks
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from Jay in Ludwig Göransson & Joseph Shirley's THE BOOK OF BOBA FETT (2021)   
    The choral section midway through was terrific. The rest was fine if not especially outstanding, some of the chase music at the end felt a little hokey, but that whole sequence was pretty hokey which might have coloured my impression of the score somewhat.
  17. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to GerateWohl in What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)   
    This habit might also be related to the fashion in the 90s not to start the movie with a big main title credit and big opening music, that fashion that was revived by Williams with Star Wars from the golden Hollywood aera.
    With the movies more and more having no main title suites and no ouvertures anymore, often score in the movie starting first after ten fifteen minutes after the movies beginning for an old fashioned composer like Williams this repetition of the end credits is probably an appropriate way to open a soundtrack album.
     
    I never understood why on the Spacecamp soundtrack the second LP side started with the end credit suite. He could have put it at the beginning or the end of the album. Strange structuring of albums.  
  18. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Naïve Old Fart in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    Apparently, the P.O.V. shot of the Bird Of Prey circling the Enterprise (where Chang says "...prick us, do we not bleed..?"), was the middle section of a much longer shot.
     
     
     
    This was always the money shot, and it grabs one's attention in the same way as the opening shot in STAR WARS does.
    It's an extremely dynamic, and kinetic (if much imitated), shot.
  19. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Marian Schedenig in Roger Feigelson announces a Williams title is coming from Intrada in 2022   
    No matter on which of my two amps I play it, or whether I listen via speakers or headphones, the bass always sounds like it's maxed out to just the point before it would distort. Like you'd run the CD through a cheap passive subwoofer and maxed out the bass EQ.
  20. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Marian Schedenig in What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)   
    Sorry for dragging out the other discussion again - but I've long thought that by far the biggest influence Orff's Carmina Burana had on Williams is his annoying tendency to duplicate the end credits/concert suite as the album's title track. It makes sense for Orff's work because of the wheel of fortune metaphor, but in Williams's case it doesn't. I suspect it's partly a remnant from the LP era where an "album" was typically comprised of two short suites (though mainly for music that was created *for* the album presentation, obviously not for "classical" works of independent length that were released on LP, and that's why I also dispute its validity for film scores), and partly a result of Williams disregarding the quality/integrity of his own underscore and wanting to give the spotlight to the "proper" concert suite. Even then I find the duplication of the track pointless and a waste of either space (in case other cues were dropped to make room for the duplicate track) or time (if it wasn't), and generally harmful to the listening experience. Especially with scores that have strong thematic development (i.e. most of Williams's longer narrative scores), where the "score proper" carefully balances when and how to present its theme(s) in the dramatic (and musical) narrative. You wouldn't open an album of Beethoven's 9th with the full Freude chorus - you wouldn't even open the final movement that way, because Beethoven gradually introduces and develops the theme before presenting the first "full" statement.
     
    And it's not about me refusing to let the music stand alone without the film - I'm very much for that, but I also maintain that with narrative scores, the musical narrative is usually based on the film's narrative, so even though you can divorce the music (or most of it) from the film, you should retain its overall structure so as to preserve its inherent dramatic arc. And that goes both ways - hurting the musical narrative in the film can hurt the film. I'm still ambivalent about Shore playing each film's significant "main" theme over the LOTR EE titles when he originally carefully introduced each of them much later in the narrative.
  21. Like
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from Marian Schedenig in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    Star Trek IV: The Undiscovered Country - since Christmas Day I've been meaning to watch this as I have a memory of a mid-90s Christmas when it was on the TV and I remember watching it in amongst the wrapping paper and opened presents in the evening when everyone else had either gone to bed or otherwise retired (weird as I don't imagine it was on that late!). Still an enjoyable way to close out (more or less) the original cast's tenure and who on good form throughout even if they do show their age a bit. Always amuses me that nobody ever complains about Patrick Stewart's age, he's only 10 years younger than William Shatner!
     
    The one thing that strikes me today is how small it feels; the Enterprise seems even more submarine like (even though even the TOS/movie Enterprise is still pretty huge) and poky, Rura Penthe seems to have the smallest caves known to man or Klingon - surely a couple of matte paintings of some much larger caves to give it some more scale can't have been beyond the budget? - and even the Klingon court where Kirk and McCoy are put on trial is clearly filmed cleverly to make it look bigger than it is (ingenious but once you notice you do kinda become aware of the limitations). Funny that some people have grumbled about Boba Fett feeling "cheap" but it feels considerably more expansive than something like this; it's kinda depressing how little money Paramount used to spend on Star Trek movies (yeah, I know, they need to make money, but still...). Plus the stuff with the gas following torpedo on the Enterprise makes no sense when it's the Excelsior that was doing the gaseous anomaly survey (which definitely sounds like the kind of mission Starfleet would commit one it's biggest starships to... no, wait). A shame that René Auberjonois' role as Colonel West was cut out, annoyingly the Blu-Ray version is the theatrical version where he doesn't appear. I am clearly anchored to the TV version where he appears so I'm always surprised when I don't see him.
     
    Cliff Eidelman's score probably still remains one of his best efforts and it's a shame he never did a James Horner career wise. Weirdly, I actually missed Jerry's theme a bit more than usual which is odd as Eidelman's upbeat main themes are pretty great and his Stravinsky (the opening is straight out of the Firebird) meets Holst darker material is great.
  22. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to May the Force be with You in What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)   
    Rosewood (LLL) by John Williams
    Another masterpiece from the Maestro that I didn't listen to since a while. The gospel song are absolutely beautiful espacially Look Down Lord.
    1997 will remain as one of the best year of John Williams just because of the high versatility of all his projects
  23. Like
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from May the Force be with You in Roger Feigelson announces a Williams title is coming from Intrada in 2022   
    Seven Years in Tibet would be great as the original album is oddly muddy sounding - it's all middle and not much else (a bit like the old TLW album). Any of the Oliver Stones would indeed be good, although I'd go for JFK over the others as, again, the sound isn't great.
  24. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Yavar Moradi in Love MASADA and QBVII? LEIGH PHILLIPS to crowdfund NEW Goldsmith premiere!   
    See his latest tease on Facebook:

    https://fb.watch/asryI9z6Tl/

    Anybody who loves the Emmy winning masterpieces QBVII and Masada should take note of this, Jerry first known foray into channeling his Jewish heritage for a score (and his last known TV work immediately preceding Lonely Are the Brave, my single favorite Goldsmith feature score). We at The Goldsmith Odyssey went to great lengths and expense to acquire an audio-only copy of this rare General Electric Theater episode (and at the time I never imagined someone like Leigh would pursue a new recording). It really is an amazing time to be a Goldsmith fan and I really hope the film music community is ready to support this for its high quality, despite its obscurity.

    Yavar
  25. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to May the Force be with You in What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)   
    Stanley and Iris (Deluxe) by John Williams
    It's been a while since the last time I listen to that one, probably too long. It's absolutely lovely
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