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Tom Guernsey

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  1. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to WampaRat in What is your favorite score to a Spiderman movie?   
    Had a couple weeks and revisited Danny’s first two Spider-Man scores.
     
    When I was in high school I was in the camp that thought Danny didn’t write a “memorable theme” for our wall crawler friend. I’d listened to the OSTs on and off. Even poked around recording sessions on YouTube. 
     
    Perhaps it’s hindsight/nostalgia/my evolved musical tastes or all of the above. (Its also due to the recent films score by Gia not grabbing me)But dang. I now feel Elfman’s scores are mind-blowingly great and should be regarded right alongside his Batman work. Complex and dense as all get out. The Spider-Man theme is adapted and stretched in all kinds of subtle (and not so subtle) ways. It’s not as immediately punchy or hummable as his Batman theme (which is what fans were Initially hoping for). But it swings and glides and skitters all over. An absolutely perfect musical identity.
     
    I feel this was a great cross section of Elfman’s musical style. I know he’s continued to evolve even more since these early 2000s efforts (perhaps lost a bit of his musical personality along the way :/) 
     
    Anyhoo. Just appreciating how terrific these scores are 20 years later. Perhaps in another 20 I might appreciate Gia’s efforts more. 
  2. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Kusi in The Chronological Film Score Thread   
    here you go 
     
    https://chrono-score.blogspot.com/search/label/Scream Saga
     
  3. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to SteveMc in Steven Spielberg’s West Side Story (2021)   
    saw this today at the theater, decided to give it a go, being a casual admirer of Bernstein's WSS, despite not caring at all for the 1961 movie.  
    I was one of 3 there.
    I understand why the movie is not doing well.  1. "regular" audiences are pretty dense. 2. this movie is not really geared towards musical fans and 3. it is too big and mainstream for the cineastes.    
     
    All that does not change the fact that this is probably Spielberg's best movie since Catch Me If You Can and just maybe even since Schindler's List.  It may be a "movie no one wanted or needed" but he put his heart, soul, and genius into this one.
    I'll go more at length elsewhere.
  4. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to May the Force be with You in The Fury vs. The Omen   
    I think The Fury is slightly better but it's perhaps because it has such a better expanded presentation than The Omen. Anyway both are amazing, haunting scores among the best of the genre.
    Still haven't seen the Omen yet so I don't know about the movie itself but I really liked The Fury
  5. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to May the Force be with You in What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)   
    Mars Attacks! by Danny Elfman
    A really fun score
     
    Balto (Intrada) by James Horner
    So beautiful... I can't get rid of it
  6. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to LSH in What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)   
    I still can't decide which of Horner's Zorro scores I prefer. This one is certainly more action-packed... and that's the mood I'm in right now.
     

  7. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Kasey Kockroach in John Powell kicks ass   
    Quality over quantity.
  8. Like
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from Hedji in The Fury vs. The Omen   
    Would have to come down on the side of The Omen for both but they are both terrific scores. I’m fairly indifferent about the movies which both have their hokey moments but are enjoyable pulpy horror. I’m totally with @Marian Schedenig that The Omen score owes far more to Stravinsky than Orff. Carmina Burana (O Fortuna at least) is grand and relatively simplistic while The Omen is full of offbeat rhythms where the accents fall on unexpected beats of the bar (very Rite of Spring). The instrumentation is fairly similar to Rite of Spring but with choir over the top.
     
    I know it’s bad form to say “well I would have made this comparison instead” but The Omen and Jaws are probably a much better pair of scores to compare; they both have Stravinskian DNA in the writing, won Oscars, are from subsequent years (so are chronologically closer together) and perhaps most critically are essential elements of their respective films. Jaws is almost certainly the better movie, but JW’s score is really integral to making it what it is. The score for the Omen is even more integral to making the film watchable. Some of the death scenes in particular are slow moving and uninvolving on their own but add in the hair raising score and they are suddenly terrifying. Back to the original comparator, The Fury is a much more romantic effort rather than one of the key dramatic driving forces behind the film.
  9. Like
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from Brundlefly in The Fury vs. The Omen   
    Would have to come down on the side of The Omen for both but they are both terrific scores. I’m fairly indifferent about the movies which both have their hokey moments but are enjoyable pulpy horror. I’m totally with @Marian Schedenig that The Omen score owes far more to Stravinsky than Orff. Carmina Burana (O Fortuna at least) is grand and relatively simplistic while The Omen is full of offbeat rhythms where the accents fall on unexpected beats of the bar (very Rite of Spring). The instrumentation is fairly similar to Rite of Spring but with choir over the top.
     
    I know it’s bad form to say “well I would have made this comparison instead” but The Omen and Jaws are probably a much better pair of scores to compare; they both have Stravinskian DNA in the writing, won Oscars, are from subsequent years (so are chronologically closer together) and perhaps most critically are essential elements of their respective films. Jaws is almost certainly the better movie, but JW’s score is really integral to making it what it is. The score for the Omen is even more integral to making the film watchable. Some of the death scenes in particular are slow moving and uninvolving on their own but add in the hair raising score and they are suddenly terrifying. Back to the original comparator, The Fury is a much more romantic effort rather than one of the key dramatic driving forces behind the film.
  10. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Marian Schedenig in The Fury vs. The Omen   
    Fine - but why? For one thing, Carmina Burana is itself much more varied than it's usually given credit for (especially when likening other works to it). Aside from the bombast of Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi, you also get the tender minimalism of Primo vere, the faux-medieval elements of Uf dem anger, and the lusty eroticism of Cour d'amours - among others. What ties almost all of it together is an often primal, intentional extreme simplicity through an exclusion of almost all complexity. Almost all of its progressions are based on repetition, usually song-style based on multiple verses, with or without a refrain. Throughout the verses, the music intensifies not through added complexity, but mere (and often slight) variations in instrumentation. For most of it, the most complex harmonic variations you get on the way to a piece's climax is an added third or fifth in the choir parts.
     
    Orff's work has of course been hugely influential for (not only) film music, and not just because a (very) few of its major set pieces have frequently (not as often as people claim, but often enough) been copied - there's also a lot of technical detail (e.g. in its instrumentation) that's become more or less commonplace, and some of the more minimalistic bits could be straight out of Glass's Koyaanisqatsi or Akhnaten.
     
    As far as comparisons go, Carmina Burana has mostly become synonymous (just for Fortuna Imperatrix Mundi, which is just one aspect of the full work) with a huge orchestra and a huge choir singing in Latin. But Latin lyrics were the norm before (and after) Orff, and aside from being in Latin, Goldsmith's Ave Satani really doesn't have either a huge choir or orchestra, and while it's rather straightforward in its main title version, it's still much more complex than Orff's piece (which intentionally isn't) - and while much of Goldsmith's dramatic underscore is also based on repetition, it always works through added complexity, again the exact opposite of Orff's approach.
     
    If you're looking for Orff-ish stuff in film music (aside from direct lifts), the finale of Goldsmith's First Knight would be closer, or perhaps even Williams's Duel of the Fates (although both harmonically and structurally it goes clearly beyond Orff's signature simplicity) - or indeed Shore's approach for LOTR, which (beyond the "obvious" simiarities in the Nazgul music and its overall instrumental and vocal forces) is almost entirely based on intentional, primal simplicity.
     
    The bottom line is perhaps that I'm rather allergic to this common comparison because it manages to do neither Orff's nor Goldsmith's works justice.
  11. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Marian Schedenig in The Fury vs. The Omen   
    The Omen is neither a one trick pony (there's far more to it than just the famous choral theme) and it has very little to do with Carmina Burana. If anything, it's much more Stravinsky than Orff.
  12. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Disco Stu in ‘Live-to-Picture’ Concerts without the Film and its Audio Track – Would you Go?   
    I tend to mostly agree with you @Tallguy.  Sorcerer's Stone is the only one I've been to, back in 2017, and I haven't rushed back.
  13. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Tallguy in ‘Live-to-Picture’ Concerts without the Film and its Audio Track – Would you Go?   
    I've mentioned elsewhere: The only "live score" that I've seen was The Empire Strikes Back. I really felt it was a waste of my time and money. Between the horrible edits for the Special Edition crap and the fact that the audience GOT UP AND LEFT DURING THE CREDITS, it was a bad day. Seriously?!? Who pays $50 - and that was the cheap seats! - and gets up while the orchestra is still playing?!?
     
    It was a terrible cinematic experience AND not a good symphonic experience.
     
    I would dearly love to see a concert performance of the entire Empire score. I would even love to see it with projection like a live isolated score.
     
    Mind you, there probably aren't many scores that I would want to hear start to finish. But probably a lot of the scores that currently make the rounds.
     
    I got to see a "Star Wars vs. Star Trek" concert with the Phoenix Symphony a few years ago. It was unreal how much joy that brought me. Who knew how great it would be to hear Goldsmith's Ba'ku Village live? And Horner's Epilogue from Wrath of Khan was just bliss.
     
    I can only imagine what it would be like to hear Star Wars or Star Trek: The Motion Picture live in their entirety. Or Superman. Or How to Train Your Dragon. I think How to Train Your Dragon 2 would kill me.
  14. Like
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from Marian Schedenig in ‘Live-to-Picture’ Concerts without the Film and its Audio Track – Would you Go?   
    There are certainly a number of scores where the music and narrative quality are such that they would play very well in isolation from start to finish. Like going to watch a ballet (albeit with no dancing) or a long tone poem. Personally I’d happily go and watch a concert of Star Wars or Empire (obvious choices I grant you) as they are great music in their own right but also tell the story in music. Plus of course they have audience recognition. Unfortunately, the intersection between a score that’s interesting as music on its own in its entirety but with broad public appeal is probably fairly limited. As I’ve commented elsewhere, in any sane universe, we’d be watching Star Trek: The Motion Picture live to film but the movie isn’t popular enough to warrant it so they do the giacchino ones instead. But that’s a score that’s musically good enough to sustain its full run time as a piece of music in its own right. 
     
    Of course one option would be to do a shorter score for one half of a concert. Maybe Jaws (even the original album arrangement if not the full score) would work well. 
  15. Like
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from Tallguy in ‘Live-to-Picture’ Concerts without the Film and its Audio Track – Would you Go?   
    There are certainly a number of scores where the music and narrative quality are such that they would play very well in isolation from start to finish. Like going to watch a ballet (albeit with no dancing) or a long tone poem. Personally I’d happily go and watch a concert of Star Wars or Empire (obvious choices I grant you) as they are great music in their own right but also tell the story in music. Plus of course they have audience recognition. Unfortunately, the intersection between a score that’s interesting as music on its own in its entirety but with broad public appeal is probably fairly limited. As I’ve commented elsewhere, in any sane universe, we’d be watching Star Trek: The Motion Picture live to film but the movie isn’t popular enough to warrant it so they do the giacchino ones instead. But that’s a score that’s musically good enough to sustain its full run time as a piece of music in its own right. 
     
    Of course one option would be to do a shorter score for one half of a concert. Maybe Jaws (even the original album arrangement if not the full score) would work well. 
  16. Like
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from SyncMan in ‘Live-to-Picture’ Concerts without the Film and its Audio Track – Would you Go?   
    There are certainly a number of scores where the music and narrative quality are such that they would play very well in isolation from start to finish. Like going to watch a ballet (albeit with no dancing) or a long tone poem. Personally I’d happily go and watch a concert of Star Wars or Empire (obvious choices I grant you) as they are great music in their own right but also tell the story in music. Plus of course they have audience recognition. Unfortunately, the intersection between a score that’s interesting as music on its own in its entirety but with broad public appeal is probably fairly limited. As I’ve commented elsewhere, in any sane universe, we’d be watching Star Trek: The Motion Picture live to film but the movie isn’t popular enough to warrant it so they do the giacchino ones instead. But that’s a score that’s musically good enough to sustain its full run time as a piece of music in its own right. 
     
    Of course one option would be to do a shorter score for one half of a concert. Maybe Jaws (even the original album arrangement if not the full score) would work well. 
  17. Haha
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from May the Force be with You in What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (2021 scores)   
    No. He’s looking for his crampons. Which Clint Eastwood has. But they are hidden behind some giant lettering.
  18. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Amer in James Horner's FIELD OF DREAMS (1989) - NEW! 2-CD La La Land edition coming January 7 2022   
    Same here. I cannot play the previous album until I have the new one  in me hands
  19. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to crypto in Marco Beltrami's SCREAM scores - NEW 6-CD Box set 2022   
    That packaging is stunning! Kudos to all involved! Looks like a lot of love went into the creation of this set.
     
    I revisited all 4 Scream films recently and loved the way that Sid's theme carries through all 4. I'll definitely check out the digital version; it's very cool that Varese were able to licence across so many formats.
     
    Side rant: What a shame Beltrami's musical input hasn't continued into part 5.
     
    Side rant 2: If only Disney would pull their fingers out and create such a lovingly crafted box set for Star Wars or Indiana Jones.
  20. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Bespin in What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)   
    An Howard Shore Party!
     
    The Silence of the Lambs (OST program using the expanded versions) Naked Lunch (Collector's Ed) Crash (Collector's Ed)
  21. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Tallguy in What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)   
    Fine.
     
    The Fury (LP)
    I hadn't listened to this in 35 years. I've never seen the film. Hey, this was pretty good. (Not Eiger good.) I have no idea what would be on an expanded edition. This might find it's way into my regular rotation. Clearly my musical tastes have evolved from when I was 17. (Boy that was not a very good year.) That was back when I never listened to side two of Star Trek: The Motion Picture. I'd like to have words with that kid.
     
    I think that Christopher Young may have taken a slight inspiration for Hellraiser from this.
  22. Like
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from Jurassic Shark in What is the last piece of classical music you listened to?   
    Jacques Loussier's two Violin Concertos on Naxos, absolutely terrific stuff. Jazzy and folksy (as you might expect given the composer), but with some fine orchestral writing. Well worth a listen. It's on Presto for £3 in lossless download... https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/8042568--loussier-concertos. Soundtrack collecting can be expensive, but classical collecting, not so much. Worth every penny. 
  23. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Holko in What is the last piece of classical music you listened to?   
    Going through the EMI Berglund Sibelius box and holy hell am I into pretty much all of it, really growing to like his style and phrasings more, thanks a lot for the recommendation, @Marian Schedenig!
    My major highlights so far are the impressionistic Oceanides, Kullervo which I liked more than I would based on my strong aversion to this operatic singing, the stirring final movement especially (funny to read along with the lyrics right after reading The Later Annals of Beleriand ), Serenade 2 and the earlier symphonies. The Karelia Suite and Scènes Historiques were fun too.
  24. Haha
    Tom Guernsey got a reaction from Jurassic Shark in What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (2021 scores)   
    No. He’s looking for his crampons. Which Clint Eastwood has. But they are hidden behind some giant lettering.
  25. Like
    Tom Guernsey reacted to Jay in Omni Publishing releasing HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON -- 1 and 2 -- by John Powell   
    And HTTYD2 cover art is revealed, with a release date of Spring 2022
     

     
     
    https://www.facebook.com/johnpowellmusic/posts/3015339682022647
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