Jump to content

karelm

Members
  • Posts

    3,312
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    21

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Disco Stu in The Classical Music Recommendation Thread   
    Oh he's hated by musicians.  There was a very famous open letter from the NY Philharmonic slamming him as being a rich guy with zero skill.  This got covered all over in classical circles including Slipped Disk and NY Times:
     
    "The voices of dissent began to crescendo. Several musicians of the New York Philharmonic confronted Philharmonic President Zarin Mehta to complain of Kaplan’s gross inadequacies as a conductor. Trombonist David Finlayson was especially outspoken, likening Kaplan to a con artist and skewering the administrators who had paved the impostor’s way to the podium in exchange for generous “donations”:
     
    From David Finlayson: 'Mr. Kaplan displays an arrogance and self-delusion that is off-putting. As a conductor, he can best be described as a very poor beater of time who far too often is unable to keep the ensemble together and allows most tempo transitions to fall where they may. His direction lacks few indications of dynamic control or balance and there is absolutely no attempt to give phrases any requisite shape. In rehearsal, he admitted to our orchestra that he is not capable of keeping a steady tempo and that he would have to depend on us for any stability in that department. Considering his Everest-sized ego, this admission must have caused him great consternation upon reflection.' "
     
    I wouldn't even call him an amateur conductor.  He's an actor who pretends to conduct this work only and the players found this deeply offensive because these were Mahler's orchestras and music that has its own cult following.   He was basically waving his hands not even knowing the orchestra was ignoring him.
  2. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Muad'Dib in John Williams, Gustavo Dudamel and Anne-Sophie Mutter at LA Phil's Annual Gala Concert - Sept. 27, 2022   
    A friend bumped in to Johnny during intermission of an LA Phil concert in the bathroom.  Imagine the awkward urinal conversation.   Famous people I've peed next to: Robin Williams, Julie Andrews, Stephen Dorff (the vampire king in Blade).  Julie Andrews was that I was waiting for a friend to come out of the men's room when Dame Julie Andrews emerged from the lady's room and I said habana-habana.  Each time I was "what the?!?!". Robin Williams was at a restaurant before a movie.  What I remember most about him and I let his kids know was as he ate near me, anytime a fan approached, he said "Sorry, I'm with my kids" as he was not in work mode but family mode as a sign of how he valued family over work.  I thought it was sweet that he prioritized his family over his fans and was totally human.  Just a dad.  Not famous.  This was maybe around 2005.
  3. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Ricard in John Williams, Gustavo Dudamel and Anne-Sophie Mutter at LA Phil's Annual Gala Concert - Sept. 27, 2022   
    A friend bumped in to Johnny during intermission of an LA Phil concert in the bathroom.  Imagine the awkward urinal conversation.   Famous people I've peed next to: Robin Williams, Julie Andrews, Stephen Dorff (the vampire king in Blade).  Julie Andrews was that I was waiting for a friend to come out of the men's room when Dame Julie Andrews emerged from the lady's room and I said habana-habana.  Each time I was "what the?!?!". Robin Williams was at a restaurant before a movie.  What I remember most about him and I let his kids know was as he ate near me, anytime a fan approached, he said "Sorry, I'm with my kids" as he was not in work mode but family mode as a sign of how he valued family over work.  I thought it was sweet that he prioritized his family over his fans and was totally human.  Just a dad.  Not famous.  This was maybe around 2005.
  4. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Holko in John Williams, Gustavo Dudamel and Anne-Sophie Mutter at LA Phil's Annual Gala Concert - Sept. 27, 2022   
    A friend bumped in to Johnny during intermission of an LA Phil concert in the bathroom.  Imagine the awkward urinal conversation.   Famous people I've peed next to: Robin Williams, Julie Andrews, Stephen Dorff (the vampire king in Blade).  Julie Andrews was that I was waiting for a friend to come out of the men's room when Dame Julie Andrews emerged from the lady's room and I said habana-habana.  Each time I was "what the?!?!". Robin Williams was at a restaurant before a movie.  What I remember most about him and I let his kids know was as he ate near me, anytime a fan approached, he said "Sorry, I'm with my kids" as he was not in work mode but family mode as a sign of how he valued family over work.  I thought it was sweet that he prioritized his family over his fans and was totally human.  Just a dad.  Not famous.  This was maybe around 2005.
  5. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Tom in John Williams, Gustavo Dudamel and Anne-Sophie Mutter at LA Phil's Annual Gala Concert - Sept. 27, 2022   
    A friend bumped in to Johnny during intermission of an LA Phil concert in the bathroom.  Imagine the awkward urinal conversation.   Famous people I've peed next to: Robin Williams, Julie Andrews, Stephen Dorff (the vampire king in Blade).  Julie Andrews was that I was waiting for a friend to come out of the men's room when Dame Julie Andrews emerged from the lady's room and I said habana-habana.  Each time I was "what the?!?!". Robin Williams was at a restaurant before a movie.  What I remember most about him and I let his kids know was as he ate near me, anytime a fan approached, he said "Sorry, I'm with my kids" as he was not in work mode but family mode as a sign of how he valued family over work.  I thought it was sweet that he prioritized his family over his fans and was totally human.  Just a dad.  Not famous.  This was maybe around 2005.
  6. Haha
    karelm reacted to Tom in John Williams, Gustavo Dudamel and Anne-Sophie Mutter at LA Phil's Annual Gala Concert - Sept. 27, 2022   
    At which point you can say to him.  "Sir, would you mind keeping it down."  
  7. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Loert in The Classical Music Recommendation Thread   
    Coincidentally, here is another John Mauceri recording.
     
    First of all, I think very highly of Puccini's last, unfinished opera, Turandot.  This recording with Pavarotti and Zubin Mehta/LPO is superb!

     
    but many feel the ending by F. Alfano abridged by Toscanini to not live up to the rest of the opera.  Here is John Mauceri's thrilling conclusion using the original finale F. Alfano composed and I love it!
     
     
  8. Haha
    karelm reacted to BB-8 in John Williams has been awarded an honorary knighthood   
    "John, help me take this crown off.”
     
    “But you’ll die!”
     
    “Nothing can stop that now. Just for once, let me look on you with my own eyes.”
  9. Haha
    karelm reacted to Marian Schedenig in John Williams has been awarded an honorary knighthood   
    "Is this the full list, Ma'am?" - "No, there is another…"
  10. Haha
    karelm got a reaction from Andy in John Williams has been awarded an honorary knighthood   
    Sounds pretty fishy if you ask me.  Maybe an obsessive fan had her killed so can say her dying words were to make JW a knight.  
  11. Haha
    karelm got a reaction from Brando in John Williams has been awarded an honorary knighthood   
    Sounds pretty fishy if you ask me.  Maybe an obsessive fan had her killed so can say her dying words were to make JW a knight.  
  12. Thanks
    karelm got a reaction from Schilkeman in John Williams and his trumpets   
    Here are a few examples - mic placement will have a big impact on the sound.  For instance, Don Williams said he can tell if the engineer knows what they're doing by how close they have the timpani mic to the drum.  Sometimes it will be just a few feet from the drum but some of the overtones are around twelve feet, so the sound of the drum won't be what you hear in the room because if the mic is three feet above the drum, it's not getting all the low frequencies!  The resulting sound will be tight and emphasize higher overtones.  This introduces a different challenge, mic bleed.   You will get phasing issues if the timpani mic captures the bass drum (just as an example) so you want an assortment of mics with different recording patterns to minimize phasing issues.  In addition, JW likes the mix to be in the room - meaning that the orchestra is already balanced and as long as the room is accurately captured, it should sound good.  This means more reliance on the room mics like the decca tree and rear mics.  That is a more classical approach and is not the trend today.  Especially since lots of scores are striped - recorded in sections so only strings get recorded, then separately, only brass for example.  Sometimes there is an A part and a B part of the strings, and the producer (er composer) can mix and match in post what part they use and how much of it.  You can't do that in a room recording.  It's also not unusual to record in different halls.  I understand Pirates of the Caribbean did this so you might get the orchestra recorded in LA but the choir recorded in London and extra brass recorded their too then all mixed together.   It's just an example of very different approaches and trends and they surely impact the final sound.  I think the mic placement is an interesting one - I've mentioned this in other posts but sitting next to instruments is not the most interesting sound.  They don't have their "true" characteristic sound up close.  A powerful brass section might sound loud but tinny.  Mics up close get more of that "tinny" sound.  Generally, you mix the room with the spot mics to balance the issues each introduce.  A double bass is very quiet up close but projects into the room and also has lots of subharmonic frequencies making other instruments sound louder (or fuller), these are examples of the complex considerations a mixer and engineer have to contend with. 
     
    One other point that is worth mentioning - this is a chart of normal hearing loss with age.  In short, the dark line at the top shows young people (in this sample 15-19 year olds) with normal hearing across all frequencies up to around 16,000 hz.  40 year olds will not hear above 14khz - the frequencies you hear drop as you age.  By 70 there is almost 100% hearing loss above 10khz.  So, though I have no insight to JW's hearing, the fact that he's 90, if we assume he has average hearing, he probably can't hear above about 6-8khz anymore.  Include to that a lifetime of music which isn't great for hearing, it might not even be that good.  It's worth pointing out that his hearing is probably better than anyone in that age, but the simple fact of his age generally impacts how good his hearing is and if he's the one approving final mixes, he's not hearing the nuances he once did.  I think his engineers are all pros and know his sound well but as already mentioned, technology, styles and approaches change over time and what he might like now, might not be what he would have picked earlier in his career.  Generally, instruments don't go near this high but there is a "sheen" or sparkle in those upper frequencies which he probably can no longer even hear though he knows is there.  Just an opinion.
     

  13. Haha
    karelm reacted to Amer in The Quick Question Thread   
    He came to the screening as Friedkin wanted him to score the film. But the conversation went down hill.
     
    Friedkin:  I want you to write a better score than CITIZEN KANE.
     
    Herrmann: ..Then you should have made a  Better film than CITIZEN KANE...
     
    Film Score Monthly covered this story in a very vivid article. I'll post the link to the download later in the day.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  14. Thanks
    karelm got a reaction from Andy in John Williams and his trumpets   
    Here are a few examples - mic placement will have a big impact on the sound.  For instance, Don Williams said he can tell if the engineer knows what they're doing by how close they have the timpani mic to the drum.  Sometimes it will be just a few feet from the drum but some of the overtones are around twelve feet, so the sound of the drum won't be what you hear in the room because if the mic is three feet above the drum, it's not getting all the low frequencies!  The resulting sound will be tight and emphasize higher overtones.  This introduces a different challenge, mic bleed.   You will get phasing issues if the timpani mic captures the bass drum (just as an example) so you want an assortment of mics with different recording patterns to minimize phasing issues.  In addition, JW likes the mix to be in the room - meaning that the orchestra is already balanced and as long as the room is accurately captured, it should sound good.  This means more reliance on the room mics like the decca tree and rear mics.  That is a more classical approach and is not the trend today.  Especially since lots of scores are striped - recorded in sections so only strings get recorded, then separately, only brass for example.  Sometimes there is an A part and a B part of the strings, and the producer (er composer) can mix and match in post what part they use and how much of it.  You can't do that in a room recording.  It's also not unusual to record in different halls.  I understand Pirates of the Caribbean did this so you might get the orchestra recorded in LA but the choir recorded in London and extra brass recorded their too then all mixed together.   It's just an example of very different approaches and trends and they surely impact the final sound.  I think the mic placement is an interesting one - I've mentioned this in other posts but sitting next to instruments is not the most interesting sound.  They don't have their "true" characteristic sound up close.  A powerful brass section might sound loud but tinny.  Mics up close get more of that "tinny" sound.  Generally, you mix the room with the spot mics to balance the issues each introduce.  A double bass is very quiet up close but projects into the room and also has lots of subharmonic frequencies making other instruments sound louder (or fuller), these are examples of the complex considerations a mixer and engineer have to contend with. 
     
    One other point that is worth mentioning - this is a chart of normal hearing loss with age.  In short, the dark line at the top shows young people (in this sample 15-19 year olds) with normal hearing across all frequencies up to around 16,000 hz.  40 year olds will not hear above 14khz - the frequencies you hear drop as you age.  By 70 there is almost 100% hearing loss above 10khz.  So, though I have no insight to JW's hearing, the fact that he's 90, if we assume he has average hearing, he probably can't hear above about 6-8khz anymore.  Include to that a lifetime of music which isn't great for hearing, it might not even be that good.  It's worth pointing out that his hearing is probably better than anyone in that age, but the simple fact of his age generally impacts how good his hearing is and if he's the one approving final mixes, he's not hearing the nuances he once did.  I think his engineers are all pros and know his sound well but as already mentioned, technology, styles and approaches change over time and what he might like now, might not be what he would have picked earlier in his career.  Generally, instruments don't go near this high but there is a "sheen" or sparkle in those upper frequencies which he probably can no longer even hear though he knows is there.  Just an opinion.
     

  15. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Andy in John Williams and his trumpets   
    Yes - that's what I've been saying!!!  The mixer is the bulk of the sound!  You can tell a good mixer to give me that Abbey Road sound in LA.  But not many ask for that now.  It's too retro.   Think of it this way.  Can a great chef make a great meal with mediocre ingredients?  Generally, yes someone who is a master in their craft can make wonders with something subpar.  Someone who doesn't know what they're doing can't do much with even the best quality ingredients.  It's the same with the mix.  They might not be able to make gold out of crap but sometimes, the highest quality craftmanship will exceed poorly handled gems. 
  16. Like
    karelm got a reaction from ricsim88 in John Williams and his trumpets   
    Here are a few examples - mic placement will have a big impact on the sound.  For instance, Don Williams said he can tell if the engineer knows what they're doing by how close they have the timpani mic to the drum.  Sometimes it will be just a few feet from the drum but some of the overtones are around twelve feet, so the sound of the drum won't be what you hear in the room because if the mic is three feet above the drum, it's not getting all the low frequencies!  The resulting sound will be tight and emphasize higher overtones.  This introduces a different challenge, mic bleed.   You will get phasing issues if the timpani mic captures the bass drum (just as an example) so you want an assortment of mics with different recording patterns to minimize phasing issues.  In addition, JW likes the mix to be in the room - meaning that the orchestra is already balanced and as long as the room is accurately captured, it should sound good.  This means more reliance on the room mics like the decca tree and rear mics.  That is a more classical approach and is not the trend today.  Especially since lots of scores are striped - recorded in sections so only strings get recorded, then separately, only brass for example.  Sometimes there is an A part and a B part of the strings, and the producer (er composer) can mix and match in post what part they use and how much of it.  You can't do that in a room recording.  It's also not unusual to record in different halls.  I understand Pirates of the Caribbean did this so you might get the orchestra recorded in LA but the choir recorded in London and extra brass recorded their too then all mixed together.   It's just an example of very different approaches and trends and they surely impact the final sound.  I think the mic placement is an interesting one - I've mentioned this in other posts but sitting next to instruments is not the most interesting sound.  They don't have their "true" characteristic sound up close.  A powerful brass section might sound loud but tinny.  Mics up close get more of that "tinny" sound.  Generally, you mix the room with the spot mics to balance the issues each introduce.  A double bass is very quiet up close but projects into the room and also has lots of subharmonic frequencies making other instruments sound louder (or fuller), these are examples of the complex considerations a mixer and engineer have to contend with. 
     
    One other point that is worth mentioning - this is a chart of normal hearing loss with age.  In short, the dark line at the top shows young people (in this sample 15-19 year olds) with normal hearing across all frequencies up to around 16,000 hz.  40 year olds will not hear above 14khz - the frequencies you hear drop as you age.  By 70 there is almost 100% hearing loss above 10khz.  So, though I have no insight to JW's hearing, the fact that he's 90, if we assume he has average hearing, he probably can't hear above about 6-8khz anymore.  Include to that a lifetime of music which isn't great for hearing, it might not even be that good.  It's worth pointing out that his hearing is probably better than anyone in that age, but the simple fact of his age generally impacts how good his hearing is and if he's the one approving final mixes, he's not hearing the nuances he once did.  I think his engineers are all pros and know his sound well but as already mentioned, technology, styles and approaches change over time and what he might like now, might not be what he would have picked earlier in his career.  Generally, instruments don't go near this high but there is a "sheen" or sparkle in those upper frequencies which he probably can no longer even hear though he knows is there.  Just an opinion.
     

  17. Like
    karelm reacted to WampaRat in The Austin Wintory Thread   
    Watch/Listen with his score annotations! This was so wonderful. Love reading his process while hearing the cues. I hope he gets more projects like this. Hope he gets an Emmy for this one.
  18. Haha
  19. Thanks
    karelm got a reaction from Martinland in A perfect moment in “The Departure” from ‘E.T.’   
    I thought the very same about the last 15 minutes of CEOTK.  The music does 90% of the story telling with characters just looking in awe and it is a far more complex set of emotions that film's ending conveys.  Mystery + hope + fear + reunions + longing + joy + wonder + etc.  I've also heard this very same passage of E.T. pointed out by musicians about what they dislike most about Spielberg + JW.  I personally love it very much partially because I was a lonely young kid in the audience when I first saw and heard this film, Elliots age, and the film and score were incredibly moving and any time I hear it, I revisit my childhood.  It hits all the nostalgia checkboxes like Spielberg and JW do so well.  
     
    I remember before E.T. was released, they really teased this up as a sequel to CEOTK of sorts.  CEOTK had a page in magazines just showing a road with a light at the end which was incredibly mysterious.  E.T. teased...first he scared us with Jaws, then entertained us...
     
     
  20. Like
    karelm got a reaction from thx99 in John Williams and his trumpets   
    Here are a few examples - mic placement will have a big impact on the sound.  For instance, Don Williams said he can tell if the engineer knows what they're doing by how close they have the timpani mic to the drum.  Sometimes it will be just a few feet from the drum but some of the overtones are around twelve feet, so the sound of the drum won't be what you hear in the room because if the mic is three feet above the drum, it's not getting all the low frequencies!  The resulting sound will be tight and emphasize higher overtones.  This introduces a different challenge, mic bleed.   You will get phasing issues if the timpani mic captures the bass drum (just as an example) so you want an assortment of mics with different recording patterns to minimize phasing issues.  In addition, JW likes the mix to be in the room - meaning that the orchestra is already balanced and as long as the room is accurately captured, it should sound good.  This means more reliance on the room mics like the decca tree and rear mics.  That is a more classical approach and is not the trend today.  Especially since lots of scores are striped - recorded in sections so only strings get recorded, then separately, only brass for example.  Sometimes there is an A part and a B part of the strings, and the producer (er composer) can mix and match in post what part they use and how much of it.  You can't do that in a room recording.  It's also not unusual to record in different halls.  I understand Pirates of the Caribbean did this so you might get the orchestra recorded in LA but the choir recorded in London and extra brass recorded their too then all mixed together.   It's just an example of very different approaches and trends and they surely impact the final sound.  I think the mic placement is an interesting one - I've mentioned this in other posts but sitting next to instruments is not the most interesting sound.  They don't have their "true" characteristic sound up close.  A powerful brass section might sound loud but tinny.  Mics up close get more of that "tinny" sound.  Generally, you mix the room with the spot mics to balance the issues each introduce.  A double bass is very quiet up close but projects into the room and also has lots of subharmonic frequencies making other instruments sound louder (or fuller), these are examples of the complex considerations a mixer and engineer have to contend with. 
     
    One other point that is worth mentioning - this is a chart of normal hearing loss with age.  In short, the dark line at the top shows young people (in this sample 15-19 year olds) with normal hearing across all frequencies up to around 16,000 hz.  40 year olds will not hear above 14khz - the frequencies you hear drop as you age.  By 70 there is almost 100% hearing loss above 10khz.  So, though I have no insight to JW's hearing, the fact that he's 90, if we assume he has average hearing, he probably can't hear above about 6-8khz anymore.  Include to that a lifetime of music which isn't great for hearing, it might not even be that good.  It's worth pointing out that his hearing is probably better than anyone in that age, but the simple fact of his age generally impacts how good his hearing is and if he's the one approving final mixes, he's not hearing the nuances he once did.  I think his engineers are all pros and know his sound well but as already mentioned, technology, styles and approaches change over time and what he might like now, might not be what he would have picked earlier in his career.  Generally, instruments don't go near this high but there is a "sheen" or sparkle in those upper frequencies which he probably can no longer even hear though he knows is there.  Just an opinion.
     

  21. Like
    karelm got a reaction from enderdrag64 in John Williams and his trumpets   
    Here are a few examples - mic placement will have a big impact on the sound.  For instance, Don Williams said he can tell if the engineer knows what they're doing by how close they have the timpani mic to the drum.  Sometimes it will be just a few feet from the drum but some of the overtones are around twelve feet, so the sound of the drum won't be what you hear in the room because if the mic is three feet above the drum, it's not getting all the low frequencies!  The resulting sound will be tight and emphasize higher overtones.  This introduces a different challenge, mic bleed.   You will get phasing issues if the timpani mic captures the bass drum (just as an example) so you want an assortment of mics with different recording patterns to minimize phasing issues.  In addition, JW likes the mix to be in the room - meaning that the orchestra is already balanced and as long as the room is accurately captured, it should sound good.  This means more reliance on the room mics like the decca tree and rear mics.  That is a more classical approach and is not the trend today.  Especially since lots of scores are striped - recorded in sections so only strings get recorded, then separately, only brass for example.  Sometimes there is an A part and a B part of the strings, and the producer (er composer) can mix and match in post what part they use and how much of it.  You can't do that in a room recording.  It's also not unusual to record in different halls.  I understand Pirates of the Caribbean did this so you might get the orchestra recorded in LA but the choir recorded in London and extra brass recorded their too then all mixed together.   It's just an example of very different approaches and trends and they surely impact the final sound.  I think the mic placement is an interesting one - I've mentioned this in other posts but sitting next to instruments is not the most interesting sound.  They don't have their "true" characteristic sound up close.  A powerful brass section might sound loud but tinny.  Mics up close get more of that "tinny" sound.  Generally, you mix the room with the spot mics to balance the issues each introduce.  A double bass is very quiet up close but projects into the room and also has lots of subharmonic frequencies making other instruments sound louder (or fuller), these are examples of the complex considerations a mixer and engineer have to contend with. 
     
    One other point that is worth mentioning - this is a chart of normal hearing loss with age.  In short, the dark line at the top shows young people (in this sample 15-19 year olds) with normal hearing across all frequencies up to around 16,000 hz.  40 year olds will not hear above 14khz - the frequencies you hear drop as you age.  By 70 there is almost 100% hearing loss above 10khz.  So, though I have no insight to JW's hearing, the fact that he's 90, if we assume he has average hearing, he probably can't hear above about 6-8khz anymore.  Include to that a lifetime of music which isn't great for hearing, it might not even be that good.  It's worth pointing out that his hearing is probably better than anyone in that age, but the simple fact of his age generally impacts how good his hearing is and if he's the one approving final mixes, he's not hearing the nuances he once did.  I think his engineers are all pros and know his sound well but as already mentioned, technology, styles and approaches change over time and what he might like now, might not be what he would have picked earlier in his career.  Generally, instruments don't go near this high but there is a "sheen" or sparkle in those upper frequencies which he probably can no longer even hear though he knows is there.  Just an opinion.
     

  22. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Muad'Dib in John Williams and his trumpets   
    Here are a few examples - mic placement will have a big impact on the sound.  For instance, Don Williams said he can tell if the engineer knows what they're doing by how close they have the timpani mic to the drum.  Sometimes it will be just a few feet from the drum but some of the overtones are around twelve feet, so the sound of the drum won't be what you hear in the room because if the mic is three feet above the drum, it's not getting all the low frequencies!  The resulting sound will be tight and emphasize higher overtones.  This introduces a different challenge, mic bleed.   You will get phasing issues if the timpani mic captures the bass drum (just as an example) so you want an assortment of mics with different recording patterns to minimize phasing issues.  In addition, JW likes the mix to be in the room - meaning that the orchestra is already balanced and as long as the room is accurately captured, it should sound good.  This means more reliance on the room mics like the decca tree and rear mics.  That is a more classical approach and is not the trend today.  Especially since lots of scores are striped - recorded in sections so only strings get recorded, then separately, only brass for example.  Sometimes there is an A part and a B part of the strings, and the producer (er composer) can mix and match in post what part they use and how much of it.  You can't do that in a room recording.  It's also not unusual to record in different halls.  I understand Pirates of the Caribbean did this so you might get the orchestra recorded in LA but the choir recorded in London and extra brass recorded their too then all mixed together.   It's just an example of very different approaches and trends and they surely impact the final sound.  I think the mic placement is an interesting one - I've mentioned this in other posts but sitting next to instruments is not the most interesting sound.  They don't have their "true" characteristic sound up close.  A powerful brass section might sound loud but tinny.  Mics up close get more of that "tinny" sound.  Generally, you mix the room with the spot mics to balance the issues each introduce.  A double bass is very quiet up close but projects into the room and also has lots of subharmonic frequencies making other instruments sound louder (or fuller), these are examples of the complex considerations a mixer and engineer have to contend with. 
     
    One other point that is worth mentioning - this is a chart of normal hearing loss with age.  In short, the dark line at the top shows young people (in this sample 15-19 year olds) with normal hearing across all frequencies up to around 16,000 hz.  40 year olds will not hear above 14khz - the frequencies you hear drop as you age.  By 70 there is almost 100% hearing loss above 10khz.  So, though I have no insight to JW's hearing, the fact that he's 90, if we assume he has average hearing, he probably can't hear above about 6-8khz anymore.  Include to that a lifetime of music which isn't great for hearing, it might not even be that good.  It's worth pointing out that his hearing is probably better than anyone in that age, but the simple fact of his age generally impacts how good his hearing is and if he's the one approving final mixes, he's not hearing the nuances he once did.  I think his engineers are all pros and know his sound well but as already mentioned, technology, styles and approaches change over time and what he might like now, might not be what he would have picked earlier in his career.  Generally, instruments don't go near this high but there is a "sheen" or sparkle in those upper frequencies which he probably can no longer even hear though he knows is there.  Just an opinion.
     

  23. Thanks
    karelm got a reaction from Fabulin in John Williams and his trumpets   
    Here are a few examples - mic placement will have a big impact on the sound.  For instance, Don Williams said he can tell if the engineer knows what they're doing by how close they have the timpani mic to the drum.  Sometimes it will be just a few feet from the drum but some of the overtones are around twelve feet, so the sound of the drum won't be what you hear in the room because if the mic is three feet above the drum, it's not getting all the low frequencies!  The resulting sound will be tight and emphasize higher overtones.  This introduces a different challenge, mic bleed.   You will get phasing issues if the timpani mic captures the bass drum (just as an example) so you want an assortment of mics with different recording patterns to minimize phasing issues.  In addition, JW likes the mix to be in the room - meaning that the orchestra is already balanced and as long as the room is accurately captured, it should sound good.  This means more reliance on the room mics like the decca tree and rear mics.  That is a more classical approach and is not the trend today.  Especially since lots of scores are striped - recorded in sections so only strings get recorded, then separately, only brass for example.  Sometimes there is an A part and a B part of the strings, and the producer (er composer) can mix and match in post what part they use and how much of it.  You can't do that in a room recording.  It's also not unusual to record in different halls.  I understand Pirates of the Caribbean did this so you might get the orchestra recorded in LA but the choir recorded in London and extra brass recorded their too then all mixed together.   It's just an example of very different approaches and trends and they surely impact the final sound.  I think the mic placement is an interesting one - I've mentioned this in other posts but sitting next to instruments is not the most interesting sound.  They don't have their "true" characteristic sound up close.  A powerful brass section might sound loud but tinny.  Mics up close get more of that "tinny" sound.  Generally, you mix the room with the spot mics to balance the issues each introduce.  A double bass is very quiet up close but projects into the room and also has lots of subharmonic frequencies making other instruments sound louder (or fuller), these are examples of the complex considerations a mixer and engineer have to contend with. 
     
    One other point that is worth mentioning - this is a chart of normal hearing loss with age.  In short, the dark line at the top shows young people (in this sample 15-19 year olds) with normal hearing across all frequencies up to around 16,000 hz.  40 year olds will not hear above 14khz - the frequencies you hear drop as you age.  By 70 there is almost 100% hearing loss above 10khz.  So, though I have no insight to JW's hearing, the fact that he's 90, if we assume he has average hearing, he probably can't hear above about 6-8khz anymore.  Include to that a lifetime of music which isn't great for hearing, it might not even be that good.  It's worth pointing out that his hearing is probably better than anyone in that age, but the simple fact of his age generally impacts how good his hearing is and if he's the one approving final mixes, he's not hearing the nuances he once did.  I think his engineers are all pros and know his sound well but as already mentioned, technology, styles and approaches change over time and what he might like now, might not be what he would have picked earlier in his career.  Generally, instruments don't go near this high but there is a "sheen" or sparkle in those upper frequencies which he probably can no longer even hear though he knows is there.  Just an opinion.
     

  24. Thanks
    karelm got a reaction from ragoz350 in John Williams and his trumpets   
    Here are a few examples - mic placement will have a big impact on the sound.  For instance, Don Williams said he can tell if the engineer knows what they're doing by how close they have the timpani mic to the drum.  Sometimes it will be just a few feet from the drum but some of the overtones are around twelve feet, so the sound of the drum won't be what you hear in the room because if the mic is three feet above the drum, it's not getting all the low frequencies!  The resulting sound will be tight and emphasize higher overtones.  This introduces a different challenge, mic bleed.   You will get phasing issues if the timpani mic captures the bass drum (just as an example) so you want an assortment of mics with different recording patterns to minimize phasing issues.  In addition, JW likes the mix to be in the room - meaning that the orchestra is already balanced and as long as the room is accurately captured, it should sound good.  This means more reliance on the room mics like the decca tree and rear mics.  That is a more classical approach and is not the trend today.  Especially since lots of scores are striped - recorded in sections so only strings get recorded, then separately, only brass for example.  Sometimes there is an A part and a B part of the strings, and the producer (er composer) can mix and match in post what part they use and how much of it.  You can't do that in a room recording.  It's also not unusual to record in different halls.  I understand Pirates of the Caribbean did this so you might get the orchestra recorded in LA but the choir recorded in London and extra brass recorded their too then all mixed together.   It's just an example of very different approaches and trends and they surely impact the final sound.  I think the mic placement is an interesting one - I've mentioned this in other posts but sitting next to instruments is not the most interesting sound.  They don't have their "true" characteristic sound up close.  A powerful brass section might sound loud but tinny.  Mics up close get more of that "tinny" sound.  Generally, you mix the room with the spot mics to balance the issues each introduce.  A double bass is very quiet up close but projects into the room and also has lots of subharmonic frequencies making other instruments sound louder (or fuller), these are examples of the complex considerations a mixer and engineer have to contend with. 
     
    One other point that is worth mentioning - this is a chart of normal hearing loss with age.  In short, the dark line at the top shows young people (in this sample 15-19 year olds) with normal hearing across all frequencies up to around 16,000 hz.  40 year olds will not hear above 14khz - the frequencies you hear drop as you age.  By 70 there is almost 100% hearing loss above 10khz.  So, though I have no insight to JW's hearing, the fact that he's 90, if we assume he has average hearing, he probably can't hear above about 6-8khz anymore.  Include to that a lifetime of music which isn't great for hearing, it might not even be that good.  It's worth pointing out that his hearing is probably better than anyone in that age, but the simple fact of his age generally impacts how good his hearing is and if he's the one approving final mixes, he's not hearing the nuances he once did.  I think his engineers are all pros and know his sound well but as already mentioned, technology, styles and approaches change over time and what he might like now, might not be what he would have picked earlier in his career.  Generally, instruments don't go near this high but there is a "sheen" or sparkle in those upper frequencies which he probably can no longer even hear though he knows is there.  Just an opinion.
     

  25. Like
    karelm got a reaction from WilliamsStarShip2282 in John Williams, Gustavo Dudamel and Anne-Sophie Mutter at LA Phil's Annual Gala Concert - Sept. 27, 2022   
    Oh do it!  The Maestro isn't getting any younger!  I have so many personal memories around JW and non are regretted.   The first time I saw him in concert was in the mid 1990's and I still remember it as a major deal.  
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.