Jump to content

karelm

Members
  • Posts

    3,139
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    20

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Bryant Burnette in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    Hello,
    I've uploaded the full recordings from KUSC's interview with John Williams and you can download them here:
    https://www.yousendit.com/download/UVJqTmZkdENvQnNpR01UQw
    Unfortunately, I don't have enough server space to store somewhere so if someone is willing to post them because this link will expire in two weeks.
    Enjoy!
  2. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Incanus in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    ...one more thing. Jim said that maestro came in to the studio several times last month to record the broadcast and is in "excellent health".
  3. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Once in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    Just a note, I contacted the radio station and they'll send me the full audio CD by mail. I'll upload it somewhere when I get it so we should all have this soon. Special thanks to Jim Svejda for having a kind heart to a JW fan.
  4. Like
    karelm got a reaction from indy4 in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    ...one more thing. Jim said that maestro came in to the studio several times last month to record the broadcast and is in "excellent health".
  5. Like
    karelm got a reaction from russds in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    Just a note, I contacted the radio station and they'll send me the full audio CD by mail. I'll upload it somewhere when I get it so we should all have this soon. Special thanks to Jim Svejda for having a kind heart to a JW fan.
  6. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Muad'Dib in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    Just a note, I contacted the radio station and they'll send me the full audio CD by mail. I'll upload it somewhere when I get it so we should all have this soon. Special thanks to Jim Svejda for having a kind heart to a JW fan.
  7. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Sibelius6 in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    ...one more thing. Jim said that maestro came in to the studio several times last month to record the broadcast and is in "excellent health".
  8. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Sibelius6 in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    Just a note, I contacted the radio station and they'll send me the full audio CD by mail. I'll upload it somewhere when I get it so we should all have this soon. Special thanks to Jim Svejda for having a kind heart to a JW fan.
  9. Like
    karelm got a reaction from crocodile in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    Just a note, I contacted the radio station and they'll send me the full audio CD by mail. I'll upload it somewhere when I get it so we should all have this soon. Special thanks to Jim Svejda for having a kind heart to a JW fan.
  10. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Jay in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    Just a note, I contacted the radio station and they'll send me the full audio CD by mail. I'll upload it somewhere when I get it so we should all have this soon. Special thanks to Jim Svejda for having a kind heart to a JW fan.
  11. Like
    karelm reacted to Ludwig in Favorite John Williams Chord or Chord Progression   
    This is not necessarily a music theory thread, I just want to know what chords or chord progressions are some of your favorites in JW's scores. They can be completely normal chords but maybe used in a powerful or emotive way. Or they can be unusual chords that through their strangeness give the music its power.
    I'll start things off. The chord in the Superman March at 2:51 below has always blown me away, especially when it resolves to the more normal chord at 2:56 and of course then onto the cadence at 3:00 for a really satisfying resolution. The initial chord is just so "supernaturally" grandiose, as is so appropriate for the film and character:

    What is among your favorites?
  12. Like
  13. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Once in Williams interview on Classical KUSC (April 25th, 2013)   
    Will anyone record this please?
  14. Like
    karelm reacted to Datameister in Unique "Williams-isms"?   
    The others are correct when they say that it's all Williams. When working on a film score, he indeed writes an average of 1 or 2 minutes a day, sitting at the piano with a pencil and a sheet of eight-staff sheet music sketch paper. The sketches include or imply 99% of the information found in the final score, including every note of the flourishes you're talking about. Now, in order to be able to write at a sufficient speed, he does use some shorthand and so forth. For instance, those flourishes and scales and runs usually end up using nearly the entire woodwind section, with octave doublings and voicings that are pretty straightforward. Williams will typically write out just a single octave with the direction WIND above it, allowing the orchestrator for that cue to divide it all up appropriately. It's not that Williams isn't capable of doing this on his own - on the contrary, he does his own orchestration when time permits. It's just that there's a fair amount of nitty-gritty stuff like that to do in a short period of time, stuff that's more about technical expertise than creativity. In other words, no matter which of Williams' orchestrators takes care of a given cue, it's still gonna end up sounding the same, because all the information is there (in some form) in the sketch.
    Now, there are occasional exceptions. But it's usually pretty hard to know whether the changes were made by the orchestrator or by Williams making a suggestion after the sketch was finished. And those changes are typically pretty minor.
    Long story short, it's all Williams!
  15. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Miguel Andrade in Williams Concerti   
    In an interview last year, he's quoted as saying this: He still goes to the piano every day, pencil in hand. “Well, I take the occasional Sunday off. Mind you, there are good days and bad days. A lot of it is rubbish! But it’s the process. It’s picking up the pencil, writing it, having it played, moving on.” While almost every other composer on the planet now employs some kind of electronic technology, for Williams, the old-fashioned tools are key. “It’s an influence that would be hard to quantify, but I think methodology is intimately connected to result,” he considers. “The pencil and paper are still very good tools, as is the piano. It’s something you do with your hands, so there’s an aspect of craftsmanship involved, even penmanship. And largely because I’ve been so busy, I haven’t had the time to go back and re-tool, and learn new methods I might have greatly benefited from.”
    It is an extraordinary thought that there might have been more from John Williams had he only learnt to use a synthesiser. With the 80th birthday gala approaching, is there anything of which he is most proud? He looks momentarily troubled. “There must surely be bars, here and there, but it’s my personality never to be completely sure that what I’ve done is the best. There’s enough dissatisfaction gnawing at me all the time that I want to try to keep pushing forward.”
    And what would Johnny Williams Senior think, I wonder, if he could see his son today? “He’d be very surprised by the amount of writing I’ve been able to do!” he chuckles. “I’m surprised! My personal library is a huge clutter, I’ll put it that way.” His voice drops to a wistful near-whisper. “After 60 years of doing this, it’s like breathing for me, or daily meals. My wife is often chiding me – why don’t you give yourself a break for a month or two, you might write better if you got away from it! But my vacation from the Hollywood work has been to sit down here at Tanglewood and write an overture for someone, a concerto for a friend.” He contemplates this. “I think the best way it has ever been put was by Rachmaninoff, who said ‘music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music.’ As long as we’re fortunate enough to tinker around with music, I believe it is deserving of our interest until we draw our last breath.”
  16. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Incanus in Williams Concerti   
    In an interview last year, he's quoted as saying this: He still goes to the piano every day, pencil in hand. “Well, I take the occasional Sunday off. Mind you, there are good days and bad days. A lot of it is rubbish! But it’s the process. It’s picking up the pencil, writing it, having it played, moving on.” While almost every other composer on the planet now employs some kind of electronic technology, for Williams, the old-fashioned tools are key. “It’s an influence that would be hard to quantify, but I think methodology is intimately connected to result,” he considers. “The pencil and paper are still very good tools, as is the piano. It’s something you do with your hands, so there’s an aspect of craftsmanship involved, even penmanship. And largely because I’ve been so busy, I haven’t had the time to go back and re-tool, and learn new methods I might have greatly benefited from.”
    It is an extraordinary thought that there might have been more from John Williams had he only learnt to use a synthesiser. With the 80th birthday gala approaching, is there anything of which he is most proud? He looks momentarily troubled. “There must surely be bars, here and there, but it’s my personality never to be completely sure that what I’ve done is the best. There’s enough dissatisfaction gnawing at me all the time that I want to try to keep pushing forward.”
    And what would Johnny Williams Senior think, I wonder, if he could see his son today? “He’d be very surprised by the amount of writing I’ve been able to do!” he chuckles. “I’m surprised! My personal library is a huge clutter, I’ll put it that way.” His voice drops to a wistful near-whisper. “After 60 years of doing this, it’s like breathing for me, or daily meals. My wife is often chiding me – why don’t you give yourself a break for a month or two, you might write better if you got away from it! But my vacation from the Hollywood work has been to sit down here at Tanglewood and write an overture for someone, a concerto for a friend.” He contemplates this. “I think the best way it has ever been put was by Rachmaninoff, who said ‘music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music.’ As long as we’re fortunate enough to tinker around with music, I believe it is deserving of our interest until we draw our last breath.”
  17. Like
    karelm got a reaction from WilliamsStarShip2282 in Williams Concerti   
    In an interview last year, he's quoted as saying this: He still goes to the piano every day, pencil in hand. “Well, I take the occasional Sunday off. Mind you, there are good days and bad days. A lot of it is rubbish! But it’s the process. It’s picking up the pencil, writing it, having it played, moving on.” While almost every other composer on the planet now employs some kind of electronic technology, for Williams, the old-fashioned tools are key. “It’s an influence that would be hard to quantify, but I think methodology is intimately connected to result,” he considers. “The pencil and paper are still very good tools, as is the piano. It’s something you do with your hands, so there’s an aspect of craftsmanship involved, even penmanship. And largely because I’ve been so busy, I haven’t had the time to go back and re-tool, and learn new methods I might have greatly benefited from.”
    It is an extraordinary thought that there might have been more from John Williams had he only learnt to use a synthesiser. With the 80th birthday gala approaching, is there anything of which he is most proud? He looks momentarily troubled. “There must surely be bars, here and there, but it’s my personality never to be completely sure that what I’ve done is the best. There’s enough dissatisfaction gnawing at me all the time that I want to try to keep pushing forward.”
    And what would Johnny Williams Senior think, I wonder, if he could see his son today? “He’d be very surprised by the amount of writing I’ve been able to do!” he chuckles. “I’m surprised! My personal library is a huge clutter, I’ll put it that way.” His voice drops to a wistful near-whisper. “After 60 years of doing this, it’s like breathing for me, or daily meals. My wife is often chiding me – why don’t you give yourself a break for a month or two, you might write better if you got away from it! But my vacation from the Hollywood work has been to sit down here at Tanglewood and write an overture for someone, a concerto for a friend.” He contemplates this. “I think the best way it has ever been put was by Rachmaninoff, who said ‘music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music.’ As long as we’re fortunate enough to tinker around with music, I believe it is deserving of our interest until we draw our last breath.”
  18. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Sibelius6 in Williams Concerti   
    In an interview last year, he's quoted as saying this: He still goes to the piano every day, pencil in hand. “Well, I take the occasional Sunday off. Mind you, there are good days and bad days. A lot of it is rubbish! But it’s the process. It’s picking up the pencil, writing it, having it played, moving on.” While almost every other composer on the planet now employs some kind of electronic technology, for Williams, the old-fashioned tools are key. “It’s an influence that would be hard to quantify, but I think methodology is intimately connected to result,” he considers. “The pencil and paper are still very good tools, as is the piano. It’s something you do with your hands, so there’s an aspect of craftsmanship involved, even penmanship. And largely because I’ve been so busy, I haven’t had the time to go back and re-tool, and learn new methods I might have greatly benefited from.”
    It is an extraordinary thought that there might have been more from John Williams had he only learnt to use a synthesiser. With the 80th birthday gala approaching, is there anything of which he is most proud? He looks momentarily troubled. “There must surely be bars, here and there, but it’s my personality never to be completely sure that what I’ve done is the best. There’s enough dissatisfaction gnawing at me all the time that I want to try to keep pushing forward.”
    And what would Johnny Williams Senior think, I wonder, if he could see his son today? “He’d be very surprised by the amount of writing I’ve been able to do!” he chuckles. “I’m surprised! My personal library is a huge clutter, I’ll put it that way.” His voice drops to a wistful near-whisper. “After 60 years of doing this, it’s like breathing for me, or daily meals. My wife is often chiding me – why don’t you give yourself a break for a month or two, you might write better if you got away from it! But my vacation from the Hollywood work has been to sit down here at Tanglewood and write an overture for someone, a concerto for a friend.” He contemplates this. “I think the best way it has ever been put was by Rachmaninoff, who said ‘music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music.’ As long as we’re fortunate enough to tinker around with music, I believe it is deserving of our interest until we draw our last breath.”
  19. Like
    karelm got a reaction from crocodile in Williams Concerti   
    I've seen the "two symphonies" listed in his concert bio on several occasions. Is it possible the two symphonies means the original symphony and then it's revision as a different work (like how Prokofiev has two versions of his fourth symphony that are very different and both good)? It appears he's not happy with the revised version either since it was pulled at the last moment. Maybe one day there will be symphony v3.
    I'm very surprised to hear BSO owns the rights to the concerto they've commissioned. This is not typical even for a composer just getting started so how could this be the case such an established composer with a reputation? Films typically own the copyright but unusual for a commissioned concert piece that the orchestra owns it.
    The concerti I've heard are all strong and show his typical craft though structure and texture are more prominent than flash and melody. I believe more people would like these if they didn't have the thematic expectations by seeing it was composed by Williams. I listened to the oboe and harp concerto a few days ago and they surprised me with how restrained they were but they are extremely well written. I still favor the violin concerto no. 1 and cello concerto for their gloomy understatement and depth.
  20. Like
    karelm got a reaction from WilliamsStarShip2282 in Williams Concerti   
    I've seen the "two symphonies" listed in his concert bio on several occasions. Is it possible the two symphonies means the original symphony and then it's revision as a different work (like how Prokofiev has two versions of his fourth symphony that are very different and both good)? It appears he's not happy with the revised version either since it was pulled at the last moment. Maybe one day there will be symphony v3.
    I'm very surprised to hear BSO owns the rights to the concerto they've commissioned. This is not typical even for a composer just getting started so how could this be the case such an established composer with a reputation? Films typically own the copyright but unusual for a commissioned concert piece that the orchestra owns it.
    The concerti I've heard are all strong and show his typical craft though structure and texture are more prominent than flash and melody. I believe more people would like these if they didn't have the thematic expectations by seeing it was composed by Williams. I listened to the oboe and harp concerto a few days ago and they surprised me with how restrained they were but they are extremely well written. I still favor the violin concerto no. 1 and cello concerto for their gloomy understatement and depth.
  21. Like
    karelm reacted to Uni in Making sense of John Williams' higher education   
    As a personal pursuit, aiming for a future goal, it's probably no big deal. But you'll likely have to plan on publishing your biography posthumously (meaning after JW's death, of course—not yours). I speak from experience on this.
    I was on the same trail back in 2001 or so. I spent some time talking with Michael Matessino about the prospect of researching a biography directly, contacting Williams, his publicist, agent, etc. to get the necessary details. Mike made it pretty clear how difficult that sort of thing would prove (as I'm sure you've discovered yourself). He indicated that the value Williams places on his privacy would make publishing a biography difficult, and if I went ahead with it anyway, it would be something that Williams himself would probably not approve of. He wasn't trying to be discouraging, just realistic.
    So I scrapped my plans and moved on to another project. I can deal with an uphill battle when it comes to the footwork involved in research; but displeasing the man himself so I could make a name for myself was, and is, something I'm not willing to do.
    - Uni
  22. Like
    karelm got a reaction from russds in John Williams Action Music   
    It seems like JW’s action music fits into three distinct categories.
    Ostinato: categorized by rhymic repition. Swashbuckling: emphasis is on melody and harmony and ornaments. This is the Korngoldian/old fashion approach to action music. Modern: clusters and advanced techniques. Great for intense dinosaur music. Examples of the Ostinato action:
    Empire Strikes Back: Hyperspace -
    Phantom Menace: Duel of the Fates
    (after chorus)Minority Report: Everybody Runs!
    Minority Report: Spiders!
    Examples of Swashbuckling/Melodic Action:
    ESB: Asteriod Field:
    Jaws: Shark Cage Fugue:
    Star Wars: Battle of Yavin:
    Hook: Ultimate War:
    Jurrasic Park: TRex:
    Far & Away, Indiana Jones, Superman, etc.
    Modern:
    Jurassic Park - Raptor:
    I think if broken down by these three styles, you see more continuity in his action approach. For example, ostinato approach that seemed fresh in Minority Report was heard in Hyperspace too so its really just a matter of which action approach was used rather than an evolution. It seems like his bigger action sequences such as Battle of Hoth, Desert Chase in Indiana Jones, T-Rex finale in Jurassic switch between these various approaches depending on the dramatic needs.

  23. Like
    karelm reacted to Uni in Video of JW with orchestrator Herbert Spencer   
    I always associate this documentary with a moment when I impressed myself—and first began to realize how intimately I was getting to know these scores. When it first cuts to the scene of him working at the piano, he plays a sequence of four chords (three identical, the fourth a couple of steps higher). I instantly knew the precise moment in the film he was composing for: after Han shoots the ground in the asteroid and the earthquake begins. I was a little amazed I could "Name That Tune" so easily.
    That feeling was replaced a few seconds later with a staggering realization . . . I am watching him compose the music for that moment in cinematic history. Somehow the specificity of it just floored me. It was like seeing actual footage of of Lincoln writing the Gettysburg Address, or of Stravinsky's first performance of Rite of Spring, or something similarly historic. It was a singular act of creation that happened once and will never happen again (I mean for those notes in that score specifically). It's not like that's his best piece or anything. But it's that piece. And we got to see the inception of it. Too cool, really.
    - Uni
  24. Like
    karelm reacted to KK in John Williams scoring all three new Star Wars films!!   
    Oh certainly, but that's not the argument here (or at least for me). It's just I seriously doubt there was any intention of a "power grab" when he was speaking a few words at some random concert to some random audience. I think these comments don't really mean much in the end and that they're being blown out of proportions.
  25. Like
    karelm reacted to KK in John Williams scoring all three new Star Wars films!!   
    It sounds like you're blowing a simple comment waaay out of proportion.

    To me, it seems like the man just wanted to say something nice about a franchise he loved working on to an audience at a concert. There were no intentions of screwing others over (I don't think he expected anyone outside of the audience to even know what he said) or expressing his arrogance. They were simple words on a series he's fond of.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.