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karelm

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  1. Thanks
    karelm got a reaction from carlborg in Prelude for Piano and Orchestra (new Williams composition - premiered June 2021; Albany Symphony performance & recording coming 2022)   
    Gloria Cheng posted this from the premiere of the concert just now!

     

  2. Like
    karelm got a reaction from KittBash in Prelude for Piano and Orchestra (new Williams composition - premiered June 2021; Albany Symphony performance & recording coming 2022)   
    Gloria Cheng posted this from the premiere of the concert just now!

     

  3. Like
    karelm got a reaction from thx99 in Prelude for Piano and Orchestra (new Williams composition - premiered June 2021; Albany Symphony performance & recording coming 2022)   
    Gloria Cheng posted this from the premiere of the concert just now!

     

  4. Like
    karelm got a reaction from BuzzLightyear in Prelude for Piano and Orchestra (new Williams composition - premiered June 2021; Albany Symphony performance & recording coming 2022)   
    Gloria Cheng posted this from the premiere of the concert just now!

     

  5. Like
  6. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Bespin in Scores with best thematic/leitmotif handling ever (Minus LOTR and SW)   
    Superman (1978)
  7. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Jay in Williams' Second Symphony?   
    I'm sure it will be performed but sadly, not while The Maestro is with us.  I think it's something like Sibelius' Kullervo, his early choral symphony, in that the composer withdrew the work and considered it a youth or student work.  But after his death, it grew in popularity and is quite adored by fans of the composer.  It is evidently the work of a young composer, but still shows glimpses of the brilliance to come and has many fingerprints of the mature composer though a flawed piece.  I think JW's symphony will follow a similar trajectory.  
     
    I was cleaning my closet in need of additional storage space.  In a box of papers, I recently found a "Symphony No. 1" I had written 25 years ago and forgot about.  I had forgotten what it was about and had little idea of what it sounded like or if any of it was recoverable.  It was probably my first completed work and way more ambitious than my skill allowed.  I played through some of it and realized very quickly, it was disastrous.  But I could also hear ideas, motifs, and touches that I still have.  It is clearly something from me.  I wonder if it is worth fixing but a part of me thinks I'm so different musically than I was back then, it would be easier to just take a theme from that and create a new work based on that original rather than revising and updating the original.  It would effectively be a completely different work with my current skills and experience leveraged on those earlier ideas.  So that would make it a completely different work than the original...a second symphony based on the same material.  But another part of me thinks "what's the point?"  I've done that thing better in other pieces so why spend the time to revisit this original oddity that no longer has relevance to me now or where I am heading?  It's just something from my past like a diary from when I was a kid or something.  It belongs in its place and time and level of incompetence.  I think JW is sort of thinking along similar lines with his symphony.  To him, it just doesn't represent who he is as a composer and if it was to represent who he was back then, other extant works probably did that better.
  8. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Miguel Andrade in Williams' Second Symphony?   
    I'm sure it will be performed but sadly, not while The Maestro is with us.  I think it's something like Sibelius' Kullervo, his early choral symphony, in that the composer withdrew the work and considered it a youth or student work.  But after his death, it grew in popularity and is quite adored by fans of the composer.  It is evidently the work of a young composer, but still shows glimpses of the brilliance to come and has many fingerprints of the mature composer though a flawed piece.  I think JW's symphony will follow a similar trajectory.  
     
    I was cleaning my closet in need of additional storage space.  In a box of papers, I recently found a "Symphony No. 1" I had written 25 years ago and forgot about.  I had forgotten what it was about and had little idea of what it sounded like or if any of it was recoverable.  It was probably my first completed work and way more ambitious than my skill allowed.  I played through some of it and realized very quickly, it was disastrous.  But I could also hear ideas, motifs, and touches that I still have.  It is clearly something from me.  I wonder if it is worth fixing but a part of me thinks I'm so different musically than I was back then, it would be easier to just take a theme from that and create a new work based on that original rather than revising and updating the original.  It would effectively be a completely different work with my current skills and experience leveraged on those earlier ideas.  So that would make it a completely different work than the original...a second symphony based on the same material.  But another part of me thinks "what's the point?"  I've done that thing better in other pieces so why spend the time to revisit this original oddity that no longer has relevance to me now or where I am heading?  It's just something from my past like a diary from when I was a kid or something.  It belongs in its place and time and level of incompetence.  I think JW is sort of thinking along similar lines with his symphony.  To him, it just doesn't represent who he is as a composer and if it was to represent who he was back then, other extant works probably did that better.
  9. Like
    karelm reacted to Marian Schedenig in The Classical Music Recommendation Thread   
    Happy 131st birthday to one of my favourite Strauss works:
         
  10. Like
    karelm got a reaction from SteveMc in The Classical Music Recommendation Thread   
    I also enjoy Colin Matthews orchestral arrangement.
     
     
  11. Like
  12. Like
    karelm reacted to Muad'Dib in The Classical Music Recommendation Thread   
    Previn, baby!
  13. Like
    karelm got a reaction from SteveMc in Am I particularly weird and/or alone for liking the drier mix of TFA's score to the lushness of JW's prequel scores?   
    Am I crazy to like them all?  OT has a vintage analog quality I grew up with and was considered the pinnacle in its day.  PT is consistently heavy on reverb but also adds a richness to the sound that fits it's "early republic" stage.  To me, it is like technicolor.  I love those 1950s films with hyper colors that smack you but they have a vintage quality to them.  Sort of like vibrancy on an image.  It's not quite what reality looks like, there is a sheen over the colors but here, I mean musically.  Then ST has grit and reality.  Dust on the lens.  The republic is sort of in ruins and the trilogy sound reflect this through its drier mix.  It is like you can hear the rosin of the violin bow in this trilogy only but that adds a gritty quality too.
  14. Like
    karelm reacted to blondheim in Is The Abyss James Cameron's Best Film   
    The Terminator is his best film.
  15. Like
    karelm got a reaction from MikeH in Based on what the composer chooses orchestra for recording?   
    Yeah, ok, fuck you.  Basketball player Stephen Curry was paid $40 million in 2020 alone.   Average NBA player salary (not including endorsements, etc.) is 8 million (doubled with endorsements).  Classical babe Yuja Wang, the closest equivalent's total worth is 20 million.  These are people who started working at around 3 or 4 years old and like the very finest athletes are peerless in their class having spent the entirety of their life focusing on this talent.   It is probably a dozen or two world wide who command this fee and they are exceptional talents. 

     
  16. Like
    karelm got a reaction from MikeH in Based on what the composer chooses orchestra for recording?   
    If it's a package deal, the composer decides.  Packages are generally indies and less.  If it is a studio project, the composer has an opinion but other factors like distribution and buy outs from the producers will factor in.  Generally, the bigger the budget, the less control the composer has but the higher profile the composer the more clout their opinion carries.  EG:  JNH can argue for a very expensive soloist like Hillary Hahn in The Village.  Including her probably doubled the music budget.  That was the producer who agreed it was worth spending that money but the music direction had to pitch it arguing a virtuoso violin would be the voice of the blind, an obvious nod to Bernard Herrmann who used the solo viola d'amore as the "voice" of the blind heroine in On Dangerous Ground as she is generally unaware of the danger she is faced with so the music has to "speak" for that.  So the composer said I can help you tell your story if you budget for a concert violinist and the producer agreed to the pitch but the producer controlled the budget.  Generally, the lower the budget, the more control the composer gets.  Directors would want to hear what the composer's ideas are and how they can help with the story telling but the producer can say no if the request is too impractical.  I believe in Troy, Horner requested double violas (or might be double cellos...I forget exactly but something highly irregular).  Let's assume it was cellos.  So a normal big budget orchestra would use 10 or maybe even 12 cellos and Horner wanted 24.  He got it but it was the producer and director who agreed to spend it on his vision and remember they had a huge budget and tossed out an already recorded expansive score by Gabriel Yared.  This is just an example where it was actually the director and producers decision to agree to Horner's lavish proposal rather than Horner's decision.   Ideally, it's a partnership where the decision is made based on what the filmmakers need most.  You would be surprised how often big budget studio films don't have the budget they need for music but the composer suggests options to meet them in the middle based on the practical limitations.  
  17. Like
    karelm reacted to Naïve Old Fart in Other composers best imitations of Goldsmith   
    Jerry is all over BATTLE BEYOND THE STARS.
  18. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Yavar Moradi in New podcast with yours truly: THE GOLDSMITH ODYSSEY   
    I met Joel, Carrie, and Carol Goldsmith.  Joel was such a sweet man and very talented in his way.  It's sad he died so young.  In some of his scores he really captured Jerry's sound I felt but always seemed to have a smile.  Carol was so friendly and loved meeting fans of her late husband.  I assume her extroversion must have challenged him as I've heard stories of how hard it was for him to be friendly.  Chris Young, who adored Jerry the composer, told me of a time he was in an elevator with Jerry and neither said a word to the other or acknowledged the other.  Just imagine what that must have been like!  Carrie and my first music teacher went to high school together.  My teacher said a teenage James Horner tried to date Carrie.  So just imagine that soap opera!!  James Horner was at the sessions of Star Trek The Motion Picture scored by Goldsmith.  The 25 year old Horner would reuse the blaster and some STTMP segments in Corman's low budget knock off Battle Beyond the Stars. Then a 28 year old Horner took over the reigns from Goldsmith with with Star Trek 2.  That must have enraged Goldsmith!  Same thing would happen with Alien and Alien 2.  I imagine Goldsmith grew fearful of Horner being the discount Goldsmith.  I love them both of their music but also find their human drama fascination film music history.  And I've performed under Leonard Slatkin who is also on the board of the orchestra I was composer in residence of!  He showed up and I didn't recognize him.  Let's say he blends in...I thought he was just a new orchestra member until I realized who he was!!! I wish I took a picture when my jaw dropped!
  19. Like
    karelm reacted to Yavar Moradi in New podcast with yours truly: THE GOLDSMITH ODYSSEY   
    Wow I've really dropped the ball on updating this thread for the past...NINE MONTHS?  
     
    So for those interested -- @karelm@Fancyarcher@Brundlefly@Display Name@TownerFan @Disco Stu @Mr. Breathmask @Jay @Laserschwert @publicist @Stefancos 2 @Jurassic Shark @BrotherSound@El Jefe @Modest Expectations -- here's a big update about the episodes produced during that time!
     
    First, the new Odyssey Soundtrack Spotlight series... that first one on The Don Is Dead was a big hit, as has been the series in general. We haven't been able to keep up with doing one for every new release (we skipped LLL's Goldsmith at 20th Vols. 1 & 2, and Varese's Looney Tunes: Back in Action expansion, though I very much still want to find time to do one for the latter) but we've still been able to do a lot:
     
    Reminder of the first: 
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/5097955-odyssey-soundtrack-spotlight-the-don-is-dead-1973

     
    For a total premiere to a substantial expansion:
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/6119113-odyssey-soundtrack-spotlight-the-last-castle-2001

     
    A rather minimal expansion (just clean beginnings and endings of cues) but a welcome revisit, and a fascinating conversation:
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/6992374-odyssey-soundtrack-spotlight-inchon-1981

     
    Now a belated special episode covering the important total premiere of Jerry's first feature comedy, with a really cool "making of" historical approach featuring special guests Mike Mattesino, Chris Malone, and John Takis who all worked on the release... it's a longer Spotlight but perhaps the one of which I'm most proud:
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/6920147-odyssey-soundtrack-spotlight-take-her-she-s-mine-1963

     
    Another surprise total premiere of a wonderful early score (Jerry's first film in color):
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/8192306-odyssey-soundtrack-spotlight-face-of-a-fugitive-1959

     
    Another substantial expansion (I'm not on this one but David and Clark took over and had a great chat with Bruce Botnick):
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/8360054-odyssey-soundtrack-spotlight-along-came-a-spider-2001

     
    And, just out a couple days ago, all four of the Odyssey team joined by special guest Jeff Bond for an examination of LLL's latest (at last, SPYS COMPLETE!)
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/8553668-soundtrack-spotlight-goldsmith-at-20th-vol-3-the-stripper-1963-and-s-p-y-s-1974

     
    The Spotlight series itself was inspired by two things: the popularity of our interviews with Neil S. Bulk and Chris Malone (shared above in other posts), as well as the surprisingly big popularity of our special Gold Nugget 6 episode, where the four of us (me, Clark, David, and Jens) basically discussed every Goldsmith release that had come out since the beginning of the podcast:
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/3459226-gold-nugget-6-expanded-archival-collection

     
     
    Doing this new Spotlight series has alas translated into less time for interview episodes; in fact the only two Interviews released since they began were broken off of regular episodes which ran too long! So I'll be presenting those mixed in with regular eps...

    First, the Thriller scores we have covered:
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/5228800-episode-26-thriller-well-of-doom-1961
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/5667769-episode-27-thriller-late-date-1961
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/7589380-episode-29-thriller-yours-truly-jack-the-ripper-1961

     
    And now the two-part recording with special guest, Emmy-winning composer Carlos Rafael Rivera (A Walk Among the Tombstones, Godless, and most recently The Queen's Gambit). We meant to just talk to him for half an hour and then move onto Jerry's sole original score for Rawhide, similar to what we did for Leigh Phillips's initial appearance on the show for Episode 17 (Thriller's "The Poisoner")... but he was just so easy to talk to, that just didn't work out. So you should first listen to this:
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/6049561-odyssey-interviews-carlos-rafael-rivera

     
    And then after that listen to this -- his musical material breakdown for a Goldsmith western score that was entirely new to him is just masterful!
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/6464008-episode-28-rawhide-incident-in-the-middle-of-nowhere-1961

     
    We are in the complicated editing process still for a very substantial Episode 30 (Thriller "Mr. George") with Leigh Phillips returning as guest co-host (it's been two years since he first joined us on Episode 17), but since our recording session ran so long we again decided to split off our initial conversation with Leigh (shorter than the one with Carlos), where he speaks about the possibilities of a Tadlow Thriller Volume 3, plus goes very in-depth and behind the scenes about recreating the synth parts for Intrada's fantastic release of Damnation Alley:
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/8425660-odyssey-interviews-leigh-phillips

     
     
    Finally, a couple of oddball but exciting programs to share. First up we called Gold Nugget 8 even though it's really more of a Gold Boulder -- this took more work to produce than any other episode of the show, and it is entirely devoted to a single short theme Jerry Goldsmith wrote, uncredited, as his first theme for a TV series that went beyond the pilot stage. How do we talk about it for 3.5 hours? Well, against all odds it turned into a popular tune of sorts, for bands and surf rock groups! It's a bizarre story which must be heard to be believed, but we went all out and interviewed a whole host of people involved in versions of the theme over the years. This might be the Goldsmith Odyssey episode I am most proud of, so take my word and give it a listen:
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/8223919-gold-nugget-8-black-saddle-history-of-a-theme-1958-2020

     
    And finally, our joint production with The Legacy of John Williams podcast, a video extravaganza with no less than four hosts and SEVEN special guests (Mike Mattesino, Jeff Bond, recording engineer Bruce Botnick, pianist/keyboardist Mike Lang, and composer/conductors David Newman, Leonard Slatkin, and Leanna Primiani). There are actually two versions of this to be exact, a video version with the conversationalists visible and lots of rare behind the scenes photographs, and an audio podcast version which makes up for being audio-only by having illustrative musical examples edited throughout the chat:
    https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/8043156-score-masters-celebrating-john-williams-and-jerry-goldsmith

     
    And the video version, which already has well over 5,000 plays on YouTube:
     
    Enjoy, everybody -- and please chime in with thoughts about any of these!
     
    Yavar
  20. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Remco in Am I particularly weird and/or alone for liking the drier mix of TFA's score to the lushness of JW's prequel scores?   
    Am I crazy to like them all?  OT has a vintage analog quality I grew up with and was considered the pinnacle in its day.  PT is consistently heavy on reverb but also adds a richness to the sound that fits it's "early republic" stage.  To me, it is like technicolor.  I love those 1950s films with hyper colors that smack you but they have a vintage quality to them.  Sort of like vibrancy on an image.  It's not quite what reality looks like, there is a sheen over the colors but here, I mean musically.  Then ST has grit and reality.  Dust on the lens.  The republic is sort of in ruins and the trilogy sound reflect this through its drier mix.  It is like you can hear the rosin of the violin bow in this trilogy only but that adds a gritty quality too.
  21. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Jay in Am I particularly weird and/or alone for liking the drier mix of TFA's score to the lushness of JW's prequel scores?   
    Am I crazy to like them all?  OT has a vintage analog quality I grew up with and was considered the pinnacle in its day.  PT is consistently heavy on reverb but also adds a richness to the sound that fits it's "early republic" stage.  To me, it is like technicolor.  I love those 1950s films with hyper colors that smack you but they have a vintage quality to them.  Sort of like vibrancy on an image.  It's not quite what reality looks like, there is a sheen over the colors but here, I mean musically.  Then ST has grit and reality.  Dust on the lens.  The republic is sort of in ruins and the trilogy sound reflect this through its drier mix.  It is like you can hear the rosin of the violin bow in this trilogy only but that adds a gritty quality too.
  22. Confused
    karelm got a reaction from bruce marshall in Christopher Young   
    The simple answer is directors don't ask for it.  I once scored a project and for the opening scene gave a theme.  They said it had too many notes, reduce the notes.  So I simplified and they wanted it simpler still.  By the end, it was just a drone and they loved it!  If directors want themes, they'll get themes.  One of the biggest reasons why directors don't want themes so much is they do a lot more drop ins...like the composer gives them quite a few options and they'll drop it in where it feels right to them rather than having the composer score to the scene (*cough* Chris Nolan *cough*).  In effect, they're getting a more generic score that lets them have more flexibility around placement and use which they'll then edit.  Second, more films are concerned with momentum (tempo and rhythm) then melody to keep you from surfing the web or flipping channels so you get faster tempos and scoring throughout (*cough* Chris Nolan *cough*) and these are what modern directors expect a good score sounds like so that's what they ask for.
  23. Like
    karelm reacted to ddddeeee in Spider-Man 2 (2004) score research   
    That cue was written by Lurie.
  24. Like
    karelm reacted to Jay in Spider-Man 2 (2004) score research   
    I don't think Elfman was involved in SM3's production at all, but the guys who were had free reign to use all his themes
  25. Like
    karelm got a reaction from Edmilson in Spider-Man 2 (2004) score research   
    Spiderman 2 had cues scored by Chris Young (the pivotal subway), Debney and Debbie Lurie.  The complexity with tripple A scores is multiple composers might score a scene so each will claim to have composed for that film and possibly not know what was used.  In some cases the music editor uses any of them which pisses them all off.  The same happened with Spiderman 3 except Elfman made it clear he wanted no part of the project so his music was used without his creative involvement.   In some cases it was edited in.  In other cases, it was recorded using what Elfman composed from Spiderman 2 and dropped in.  I would say 80% of Spiderman 2 was composed by Elfman.  10% by Young, 5% by Debney, 3% by Lurie, 2% by others.  80% of Spiderman 3 was composed by Young, 10 % by Elfman (via preexisting matarial), 5% by Debney, 3% by Lurie, 2% by others.  The problem is Chris probably composed all the cues.  Debney and Lurie composed many more than were used as demos.  Chris also composed alternate takes that weren't used for example.  Think of the Debney and Lurie takes as alternate takes, sometimes they were used.  Lots of times all these are great music, the director just doesn't know what will test well with an audience.  The big deal with Spiderman 2 subway action setpiece (a big budget sequence where maybe 50% or 25% of time and budget is set aside for), Elfman tempo slowed down when subway slowed mimicking what happened on screen.  In contrast Chris Young amped up the tempo raising the tension and the stakes of the subway running off its track and that is what was used.  Both could work, both are good music but Chris's music is what's in the film credited to Elfman.  They read the scene differently. 
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