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Trope

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  1. Surprised
    Trope reacted to bollemanneke in James Horner's TITANIC (2017 4CD expanded edition from La-La Land Records)   
    Their third best release after Hook and HP is now out of print.
  2. Like
    Trope reacted to Jay in DIAGON ALLEY TRACK MOVIE vs SOUNDTRACK ALBUM   
    In 1983, the Return of the Jedi OST track "Rebel Briefing" actually contains music from the end of the movie.  The cue for the rebel briefing is not on the album.
     
    In 1988, the Accidental Tourist OST track "Wedding Scene" actually contains an alternate Main Title cue.
     
    In 1989, the Last Crusade OST track "Escape From Venice" contains the music for a boat chase that happens entirely within Venice, a place they continue to be in for a while after the chase.  The cue for when they leave Venice for Austria isn't on the album.
     
    In 1997, the Lost World OST track "Rescuing Sarah" is for the second half of the trailer sequence, after Sarah is already rescued from the glass and they are working as a whole to get out of the trailer together.  The actual cue for her being rescued from the glass isn't on the album.
     
    In 1997, the Amistad OST track "Mr. Adams Takes the Case" combines the start of the cue for Adams' introduction scene with a cue for later in the film when he's talking to Joadson in his home.  Both of these scenes take place before he's decided to take the case (he decides to take the case off-screen, there is no cue for it).
     
    In 1999, the Phantom Menace OST track "Star Wars Main Title and the Arrival At Naboo" only contains the very start of the the arrival cue, almost immediately segueing to music from later in the film to end the track.
     
    In 2002, the Attack of the Clones OST track "Star Wars Main Title and Ambush On Coruscant" only contains the very start of the ambush cue, almost immediately segueing to music from later in the film to end the track.
     
    In 2005, the War of the Worlds OST track "Confrontation with Ogilvy" combined music from the "bodies in the river" scene (which is before the group has met Ogilvy) and the "Red Planet" scene (which begins after Ogilvy is already dead).  The actual cue for Roy killing Ogilvy isn't on the album.
     
    In 2015, the Force Awakens OST track "Rey Meets BB-8" combines the "Finding The Map" cue from the very end of the movie with the "I've Found The Droid" cue from the middle of the movie.  Williams recorded 5 different cues for the scene of Rey meeting BB-8, but none of them are on the album.  (The film did track in "Finding The Map" into the scene where they met, so this is sort of an exception I guess).
  3. Like
    Trope got a reaction from Yavar Moradi in JAWS - 2015 Intrada 2CD Release (Complete film tracks & original LP re-recording)   
    I'm looking forward to sitting down and listening to this set from beginning to end now that it has arrived! I skimmed through the OST (which I really loved) and was reminded of how beautiful this theme is. 
     
     
  4. Haha
    Trope reacted to Holko in DIAGON ALLEY TRACK MOVIE vs SOUNDTRACK ALBUM   
    My mantra while writing it out was "make Daddy Jay proud"
  5. Like
    Trope got a reaction from Jay in JAWS - 2015 Intrada 2CD Release (Complete film tracks & original LP re-recording)   
    I'm looking forward to sitting down and listening to this set from beginning to end now that it has arrived! I skimmed through the OST (which I really loved) and was reminded of how beautiful this theme is. 
     
     
  6. Love
  7. Thanks
    Trope reacted to Holko in DIAGON ALLEY TRACK MOVIE vs SOUNDTRACK ALBUM   
    A 5 minute track was recorded to play throughout the scene, the walk through Diagon Alley was meant to be scored by the woodwinds and witchy fiddle. Then a "Reveal insert" was recorded to change the start of the reveal into an orchestral swell because it wasn't magical and awe-inspiring enough. Williams liked the music he wrote and expanded it into a longer, slower tempo concert piece in his Harry Potter Children's Suite for Orchestra, "Diagon Alley". For the original 1 disc soundtrack album release, Williams replaced the opening portion of his full recorded track with part of the Diagon Alley concert piece, this is "Diagon Alley and the Gringotts Vault" as you know it. For the movie, the filmmakers decided the reveal needed more of a warm happy reveal and excitement than a weird new world, so they replaced that same opening section with a latter track that Williams wrote for entering the Great Hall. (Confusingly, the track on the 1 disc soundtrack album called "Entry into the Great Hall and the Banquet" does NOT contain this entry music, only the banquet music.) The film also appends part of "Hermione's Feather" to the start of the track for the bricks moving out of the way. The LLL expanded release linked above has the original recorded track combined with the Reveal Insert in Disc 1 track 7, "Diagon Alley and The Gringotts Vault [Extended Version]", the Great Hall entrance in Disc 1 track 13, "Through the Doors", and the concert piece in Disc 3 track 8, "Diagon Alley". The original recorded opening of the track for Diagon Alley, the Reveal Insert, the full unedited concert piece and Through the Doors all premiered on the set, they were never before released, they were only available in a recording sessions leak with the exception of the Reveal Insert. I've done two videos about how the original opening and the reveal insert opening would've worked in the film:
     
     
     
     
  8. Like
    Trope reacted to Datameister in The Phantom Menace vs. Attack of the Clones vs. Revenge of the Sith   
    Yep. Complete programs for the prequels would be pretty easy. Complete programs for the sequels … oof. Nightmare. (But one I still fervently hope happens during my lifetime!)
  9. Like
    Trope reacted to Manakin Skywalker in The Phantom Menace vs. Attack of the Clones vs. Revenge of the Sith   
    You don't. The handful of folks that like "film edits" for whatever reason would inevitably be a bit disappointed, but editing together the music as-recorded is quite simple actually, and still provides a relatively good listening experience. It's the sequel scores that I'd be more concerned with.
  10. Like
    Trope reacted to GerateWohl in Are There Any Film Composers Working Who Can’t Read/Write Music?   
    Djawadi plays guitar live at his concerts (at least at the one I attended). 
     
    But it is really a question of musical socialization. When you come from classical or jazz music you write themes and counterpoint. When you come from electronic music you write ostinato layers with chord progressions, when you come from pop music, you write melodies over repeating chord sequences. Of course each of them evolves a little into this or that direction. But basically people have a certain way of "thinking " music. 
  11. Like
    Trope reacted to Yavar Moradi in Tales Of The Empire (May 4th) - Mini Series   
    Well... that's certainly a take you won't find much company on.
     
     
    I think you must just love young Kirstie Alley, because your diatribe against it (while completely failing to even explain why it's "dumb" according to you) really doesn't make you out to be a fan. And @Tallguy quite effectively pointed out that you really weren't paying much attention to the movie.
     
     
    Uh... WHY? Terraforming is a thing in sci-fi. What if there was a device that could terraform an entire planet super-fast, but the consequences were that it would also destroy any pre-existing life on that planet? That is an *interesting* sci-fi concept/conundrum. There's nothing dumb about it.
     
     
    Well... you're especially dumb for saying this, because of course your issue is with Star Trek III! Nicholas Meyer, writer and director of the film, absolutely 100% intended Spock's death to be permanent, and was very upset when Paramount decided to back out of that. I agree that (as much as I do enjoy Nimoy's presence as Spock in the remaining Trek films), dramatically that was a huge mistake, and Star Trek II should have been allowed to have the powerful ending for the character than Meyer (and Nimoy himself, originally) intended!
     
     
    I'm more sympathetic to this, even though you didn't explain why. But it actually took me YEARS to come around to appreciating Khan in the film. Not that Montalban doesn't give a good performance, and the Ahab connections kinda make sense. But I still rolled my eyes at the way Khan and his people were depicted.
     
     
    Jesus Christ are you inconsistent. You lament "the shattered remains of V'ger and the Star Trek that could have been" (hey, I'm a big fan of TMP too, and I do think it and the much-maligned Star Trek V actually best encapsulate Roddenberry's stated ethos of Trek) and then in the very next sentence you extoll FIRST CONTACT as "the best Star Trek movie"??? 
     
    Like... WHAT? As "a big fan of TNG", you'll know that overall that series was far more cerebral than its predecessor, which far more often descended into silly action/adventure. And yet you champion the big dumb let's-turn-Picard-into-a-violent-action-hero movie? 
     
    The let's-ignore-Picard's-established-attitudes-about-the-Borg movie? Because we need to copy The Wrath of Khan's Ahab thing and apply it to the captain? You decry how militaristic Wrath of Khan is, but hold First Contact as the BEST Trek, when it begins with the very definition of Big Dumb Space Battle, and then turns into an Aliens wannabe where all of our cerebral TNG crew pick up GIANT GUNS and go around shooting f'ing SPACE ZOMBIES who used to be their friends and colleagues? You think Gene Roddenberry would have approved of THIS movie? LOL. And yeah, there's a story about the first contact with Vulcans mixed in there somewhere... a lot of dumb mixed in with that too, to be perfectly frank. First Contact is easily the most overrated Star Trek film of all time by some margin, probably because after the sloppy Generations people were desperate for a win, and it LOOKED like a movie and appealed to general "I'm not really a Star Trek fan" audiences with its Big Dumb Action.
     
    I honestly don't know how to reconcile the inconsistency of you considering this the best Trek but criticizing Wrath of Khan for going against the ideals of Trek. I guess it must just be nostalgia, or something.
     
     
    You conveniently left out the portions of my earlier post, which I have restored for proper context and put in bold. LATER finding things with Gilroy stating he wasn't a Star Wars fan doesn't negate the fact that I skimmed your original article example and could find NO such statements in it. But nice try!
     
    Yavar
  12. Thanks
    Trope reacted to JWScores in Cinema Paradiso (film & score)   
    Happy to help! I didn't study the logic in the individual parts for that specific piece, although I believe it's essentially this: 
     
    1) the 4 parts combine in such a way that the chords of a standard harmonization are often alluded to, if never (or almost never) exactly realized;
    2) the harmonic appoggiaturas should not resolve; e.g., if the parts outline a dominant chord, the VII grade will not move to the tonic in the next chord; it will rather jump to another grade of the scale (I know this is one of Morricone's principles when writing in this style, as he mentioned it in a lecture);
    3) in an individual part, for the reasons above, jumps are favoured, as opposed to motion to adjacent grades.
     
     
     
    I cannot play the sample, but I did read the score excerpt and, indeed, it has a similar floating quality (and the C7+/9 chord in the strings is very "morriconian" as well). Nice work! The stylistic differences are due to the features outlined above. 
     
     
     
     
  13. Like
    Trope got a reaction from JWScores in Cinema Paradiso (film & score)   
    You, sir, are a legend (of 1900!). Thank you so much. I do read music, so that score example was really helpful. I'm going to analyse the score further to see if there's a pattern or logic to the note progression/intervals within the individual parts.
     
    This whole discussion reminds me that I actually tried to achieve this floating effect over a year ago in a piece I was trying to write for orchestra, inspired by Cinema Paradiso and other Morricone soundtracks I was listening to at the time. I didn't have any Morricone scores (i.e. sheet music) to analyse, so I tried to replicate the effect/something similar by ear. Here's a little excerpt, where I tried to get a similar floating effect in the high winds. Obviously nowhere near as effective as the strings.
    Emanations Excerpt.m4a

     
  14. Love
    Trope got a reaction from Muad'Dib in Cinema Paradiso (film & score)   
    Ennio's "suspended strings" effect is one of my absolute favourite techniques of his. It appears in so many of his scores, and it's always a standout moment when he applies it.
  15. Like
    Trope got a reaction from Tom Guernsey in Cinema Paradiso (film & score)   
    You, sir, are a legend (of 1900!). Thank you so much. I do read music, so that score example was really helpful. I'm going to analyse the score further to see if there's a pattern or logic to the note progression/intervals within the individual parts.
     
    This whole discussion reminds me that I actually tried to achieve this floating effect over a year ago in a piece I was trying to write for orchestra, inspired by Cinema Paradiso and other Morricone soundtracks I was listening to at the time. I didn't have any Morricone scores (i.e. sheet music) to analyse, so I tried to replicate the effect/something similar by ear. Here's a little excerpt, where I tried to get a similar floating effect in the high winds. Obviously nowhere near as effective as the strings.
    Emanations Excerpt.m4a

     
  16. Thanks
    Trope reacted to JWScores in Cinema Paradiso (film & score)   
    Yes, there is a systematic thought beyond that. I'll explain with an example.
     
    Suppose you have a melodic theme in (say) 4/4, with a clear and regular harmonic and melodic rhythm. The procedure of "suspended strings" consists in letting the 4 upper parts of the strings (violins I, violins II, violas, and cellos) be made of sequences of held notes, each one having the duration of 5/8, and in letting the 4 sequences corresponding to the 4 parts start in different eighths of the first measure. For example: in bar 1, violins I start playing sequences of 5/8 notes starting on the first eighth of the measure; violins II start a different sequence of 5/8 notes on the fourth eighth; violas start another sequence on the third eighth, and cellos start another sequence on the second eighth. In this way, no two parts are ever going to attack any note simultaneously, therefore chords become kind of "blurry" and, indeed, harmonies are "suspended". This generates sequences of very short chords that are extremely strange but preserve a reminiscence of the original harmony, and a sense of motion due to the fact that, basically, at every eighth the harmony changes in one voice. 
     
    If you can read music, you may want to see it written down, for example in this publicly visible perusal score: 
     
    https://www.wisemusicclassical.com/work/63469/The-Legend-of-1900-Suite--Ennio-Morricone/
     
    You will find two examples of this kind of writing, starting at page 5 and at page 22. The one starting at page 5 is probably the first version of "The Crisis", which I was mentioning in an earlier post. There are also plenty of examples of this technique in Morricone's commercially available concert pieces.
     
     
     
  17. Like
    Trope got a reaction from JWScores in Cinema Paradiso (film & score)   
    I love that cue from The Mission! I'll share some of my favourites.
     
    Sentimental Walk (and the many other tracks from Love Affair which use this technique). Absolutely gorgeous.
     
    Humanity (Part 1). At about 5:10 in the cue, there's a beautifully icy passage (one of my favourites from the whole score). Love the underlying cluster as well.
     
    Four Interludes (just to keep us on track, given the . The third interlude (0:53) is floaty and ephemeral. I like the harmonic ambiguity.
     
    I'd be fascinated to know the exact method Morricone used to generate these textures. I'm sure he would have had some systematic/mathematical way of dividing the harmony up across the string section and deciding when they would each move to the next note.
  18. Thanks
    Trope reacted to JWScores in Cinema Paradiso (film & score)   
    One of my favourite examples, considering how it works in the film, is this (starting at 0:50):
     
     
     
    The terminology "suspended strings" is how Morricone himself called the technique in a book written with Tornatore. There, they mention and discuss that the cue "The Crisis" from "The Legend of 1900" had initially been written in this way. However, Tornatore found it not fitting for the scene, so Morricone revised the strings parts to eliminate the suspensions, and so it became the film version we are familiar with. 
     
    I believe that the choral part in the first and last sections of the main title of "Secret of the Sahara" is written in the same way (on a static chord that involves the notes C - D - F- G - A ), although it is difficult to say for sure without seeing the score: 
     
     
     
     
     
    In my opinion, the longest version is the way to go because it gives a completely different perspective on the main characters, especially concerning the actions of one of them; it even changes the meaning of the finale, where Totò watches the collage of cut sequences from the old movies made by Alfredo. And it's much more thought-provoking, it's almost another movie. I watched it not long ago with some other people who were all previously familiar (like me) with the short version, and we all agreed that the 174 min. one was much better. As Sergio Leone once said (about his own "Once Upon a Time in America"): "Sometimes, when you cut a film you actually make it longer". I think it applies to this case 
     
  19. Like
    Trope got a reaction from JWScores in Cinema Paradiso (film & score)   
    Ennio's "suspended strings" effect is one of my absolute favourite techniques of his. It appears in so many of his scores, and it's always a standout moment when he applies it.
  20. Like
    Trope reacted to JWScores in Cinema Paradiso (film & score)   
    It's also one of my very favourite films. Morricone's son (Andrea) composed the melody and the harmony of the love theme (except maybe for small corrections); it is not known beyond doubt how much of the various arrangements and orchestrations of that theme were done by him, or by Ennio. For example, the first 1:20 of this track, 
     
    features a particular compositional technique ("suspended strings") which is typical of Ennio. I believe he invented it, and you can hear it in several of his non-film pieces as well as in many of his other film scores: there is almost always at least one theme presented in this fashion. So, this arrangement was done either by Ennio, or by his son but with a clear intention to follow that style. We cannot be sure about who did what in the other (more "standard") arrangements featured in the film score.
     
     
    I have to disagree with this. If possible, I strongly recommend to only watch the full director's cut (174 minutes), and nothing else. The final part of the movie, which was largely removed or shortened in previous cut releases, is absolutely essential to understand the story and its meaning.
     
     
     
     
    The lose threads are resolved in the full director's cut. Go for it!
  21. Like
    Trope got a reaction from Raiders of the SoundtrArk in The Official Quartet Records Thread   
    The 37-minute stereo program has recently been released digitally! Yay!
     
    Also this: 
     
    And this: 
     
  22. Haha
    Trope reacted to Edmilson in How many streaming services are you subscribed to?   
    Pretty much this
     

  23. Like
    Trope reacted to Richard Penna in How many streaming services are you subscribed to?   
    I'm finding DVDs/BDs an increasingly desirable thing given many streamers' inability to keep a particular title on their service for more than 5 minutes.
     
    I guess it's more stable with Disney as they own the rights to their own stuff, but when Netflix and Prime can't keep consistent catalogues due to licensing agreements changing all the time, I tend to start looking on the used marketplace for things. At time of writing, the Hobbit movies (for example) are on Prime, but I have low confidence they'll still be there in 6 months.
  24. Like
    Trope got a reaction from Thor in The Official Quartet Records Thread   
    The 37-minute stereo program has recently been released digitally! Yay!
     
    Also this: 
     
    And this: 
     
  25. Like
    Trope got a reaction from Jurassic Shark in The Official Quartet Records Thread   
    The 37-minute stereo program has recently been released digitally! Yay!
     
    Also this: 
     
    And this: 
     
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