Jump to content

MikeH

Members
  • Posts

    509
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    6

Reputation Activity

  1. Like
    MikeH reacted to karelm in Except for the first and last tracks, what are your Top 5 tracks from the TFA soundtrack album?   
    1. The Starkiller: this one stops me in my tracks just because it is so beautiful and moving.  It is also VERY unlike what we've heard before in Star Wars...just showing at 83, JW is still adding to the body of soundscapes in this very rich musical universe.
    2. The Way of the Force: Dramatic culmination of the story but also gives us one of the grandest versions of the Force Theme.
    3. On the Inside: Sneaking around a deathstar music but has much more tension in the underscoring telegraphing the climactic encounter in Torn Apart.
    4. Torn Apart: While full of orchestral flourishes of the bravado from the resistance, we still get a weighty pensiveness not very common in these movies.  It feels fresh, tense, doom laden, but still Star Wars...new and old.
    5. The Resistance (FYC): Great and excitingly overt brass fanfares!
     
    In hindsight, these tracks seem to show Star Wars at its most operatic...full of drama and despair for the untested heroes except for #5 (The Resistance) which is just exciting...almost an entre'acte. 
  2. Like
    MikeH reacted to Balahkay in The Force Awakens ALBUM Discussion (No Film Spoilers)   
     
    I agree.  Williams is still on top of his game.  I find TFA to be a very special score, particularly Rey's theme.  I know this is cliche, but I haven't had a musical theme like Rey's "touch" me in over a decade.  I could listen to a 30 minute suite of Rey's theme and not get bored. 
     
    I guess I'm one of the few who thought the score was brilliant after my first listen.  It's nice to see people warming up to it, though.
  3. Like
    MikeH reacted to The Psycho Pianist in John Williams Sessions - Fly on the Wall   
    Read this in the Deniz Huges group on FB, posted by a guy called Wendell Yuponce. Forgive me if it's already posted somewhere (or not the right place), but I felt this needed to be passed on:
     
     
  4. Like
    MikeH reacted to Unlucky Bastard in The Force Awakens final trailer MUSIC discussion   
    Who's Townsend? Oh really? Interesting...

  5. Like
    MikeH reacted to Incanus in What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)   
    Jane Eyre by John Williams: A beautiful autumnal score in a very British musical idiom complemented by some of Williams' most loveliest lyrical melodies. The original soundtrack album does not have a wasted note and the little over 33 minute CD (LLL re-issue) offers a whole immersive world with clearly defined thematic ideas (with the central love theme) and a surprising amount of variety including the breathless scherzo To Thornfield, the source music styled Meeting for recorder, viola and guitar, the dissonant and eerie Thwarted Wedding with its echoplexed strings and a gorgeous religioso theme in The Restoration. All comes to a tender melancholy conclusion and fulfilment in Reunion (End Title) where Williams gives the most extended and loveliest reading of the superb love theme. This is truly one of the essential early Williams scores before his world famed Jaws, Star Wars, Superman and Indiana Jones. Most highly recommended.
  6. Like
    MikeH got a reaction from Not Mr. Big in Thomas Newman - Bridge of Spies (2015)   
    Interview with Newman and Williams:
    http://www.npr.org/2015/10/17/449417429/composer-thomas-newman-teams-with-spielberg-for-bridge-of-spies
    EDIT: whoops! didn't scroll up far enough!
  7. Like
    MikeH reacted to #SnowyVernalSpringsEternal in Solo: A Star Wars Story (Ron Howard 2018)   
    I mentioned this on FB earlier.
    The Force Awakens will be the last time that the release of a Star Wars film is really a bit of an event.
    Disney will be churning them out from then on, like the MCU films.
    Even the Prequels, as bad as they are had a bit of pomp and circumstance attached to their release.
  8. Like
    MikeH reacted to crocodile in JWFan James Horner Listening Party   
    Listening to Sneakers for the very first time. It's actually really, really good. Great, even.
    Karol
  9. Like
    MikeH reacted to filmusicfan in NEW Omni Publishing Sheet Music release: James Horner's Willow   
    Hi All,
    Omni Music owner/editor here. Just released the third print run for Batman, and felt it wise to include in the announcement that Willow is in the works. Felt people could use some good news about Horner. It's sad he won't be able to see the finished product. All the other releases were given to the composers, sometimes personally.
    It seems by the posts that some of you are curious about the music, since this will be the first Omni release that doesn't have a complete soundtrack. Here's a list of the music you can expect to be included. Keep in mind that Horner never titled his compositions. In fact, only one had an official title, so I had to make them up based on the scene:
    1m1 Elora's Birth / Titles (CD Elora Danan)
    -missing village festival source-
    -missing High Aldwin fanfare-
    2m5 Village Attack (Not on CD)
    3m1 Saying Goodbye (Not on CD)
    3m2 Bavmorda & Kael (Not on CD)
    3m3 Search / Travel Montage (some material contained in Willow's Journey Begins)
    4m2 Crossroads (some material contained in Willow's Journey Begins)
    4m3 The Brownies (Not on CD)
    -missing tavern source-
    -dust of broken heart tracked in from 7m2-3 / 8m1-
    5m2 Escape From The Tavern (same as CD)
    6m0 Bavmorda Slaps Kael (Not on CD)
    -missing Willow's first use of the wand (improv shakuhachi)-
    -missing arrival at the island-
    -missing meeting Fin Razel (Fairlight pad and pan flute)-
    7m0 Sorsha Arrives (Not on CD)
    7m1 The Trek (Not on CD)
    7m2-3 / 8m1 Snowy Escape (Not on CD)
    8m2 Canyon Of Mazes (same as CD)
    9m1 Tir Asleen Battle Pt. 1
    9m2 Tir Asleen Battle Pt. 2 (combined for the CD as Tir Asleen)
    10m1 Spell / Razel Transforms (first half of Bavmorda's Spell Is Cast)
    11m1 / 2 Nockmaar Battle Pt. 1 (second half of Bavmorda's Spell Is Cast)
    (NOTE: Bavmorda's Spell Is Cast is broken in two at the 09:13 mark)
    12m1 / 2 Nockmaar Battle Pt.2
    12m4 End Credits
    12m1-2-4 are Willow The Sorcerer on the CD. The tune lead-in to the end credits has no written music, improvised based on charts, however the orchestra starts with pizz. before the statement of the adventure theme starting at 07:33. Some of this may require takedowns, which is nothing new. I had to transcribe the cue from Edward "Picking The Lock." Same with "Picture Fades" from BTTF.
    Based on time stamps of the files, I've been working since March 28th. There are 3 more left to engrave, then it's a matter of proofing to the recording, and printing. This one should be ready in a month, early August is realistic.
  10. Like
    MikeH reacted to Dixon Hill in JWFan James Horner Listening Party   
    Here you go.

  11. Like
    MikeH reacted to Damien F in James Horner 1953-2015   
    Is this the biggest tragedy ever to hit the film score community? I mean obviously great composers have died in the past, but the relatively young age of Horner's death, the sudden unexpected nature of it and his stature as a film composer have all devastated the community.
    I get the impression that Horner, like Williams, loved his craft and would never have fully retired. Williams was Horner's age in 1993 and he has written some of his best scores since then - that gives an indication of the potential Horner classics that will now never be written, they have been lost to us forever, and that gaping hole he has left in the industry can not and will never be filled.
    I've had a few days for this news to sink in but it still doesn't feel real yet.
  12. Like
    MikeH reacted to KK in James Horner 1953-2015   
    Bah! How this Lowder fella's work gets published is beyond me. This is the same guy who wrote that Giacchino's Jurassic World ranks among Williams' classics while having "mastered Williams' vocabulary" and that rambling article about all the supposed scientific theory used to write Interstellar.
    Every article I've read from him so far has been superfluous, verbose nonsense written by someone posing as an "academic" but has no clue what he's talking about...
  13. Like
    MikeH reacted to Wojo in James Horner 1953-2015   
    I tried to sleep in today. I didn't want to wake up into a world where James Horner was gone so soon, I was hoping last night was just all a bad dream.
  14. Like
    MikeH reacted to #SnowyVernalSpringsEternal in James Horner 1953-2015   
    Any chance its a case of mistaken identity and it was Prokoviev or Khachaturian instead of Horner?
  15. Like
    MikeH reacted to mstrox in The Force Awakens begins recording at Sony in LA today   
    HELP! Can somebody tell me if the 5 pages of posts after the William Ross revelation have anything worth reading?
  16. Like
    MikeH reacted to mrbellamy in Thomas Newman - Bridge of Spies (2015)   
    As much as Bridge of Spies may have turned out to be the more intriguing score, I'm a little too greedy for new Williams music to not go for quantity on this one. 2 hours of new music in all the styles and moods that a Star Wars movie typically offers - even if much of it will be similar to what we've heard before - is too much fun to pass up for me. I also feel that while Newman is more than up to the task of providing something interesting for Bridge of Spies in Williams' stead, I can't really fathom anyone but Williams on a new Star Wars episode while he's still around.
  17. Like
    MikeH reacted to Dixon Hill in Williams starts scoring Episode VII in two (!) weeks..?   
    I love special DVD-ROM content. Maybe printable stickers or posters? Hoping my dialup can handle it if there's an internet game!
  18. Like
    MikeH reacted to KingPin in Hal Leonard Signature Editions   
    Ahhhhh! You've uncovered my secret identity as a human being who occasionally makes typographical errors. What is this world coming to?!?!
  19. Like
    MikeH reacted to Dixon Hill in LA Philharmonic Kicks Off Season with ‘A John Williams Celebration’ at Walt Disney Hall, 9/30   
    And if so, what do Brian Eno and Jeremy Soule think about that?
  20. Like
    MikeH got a reaction from bollemanneke in How do we feel about James Horner's Titanic?   
    Terrific score. I don't know how many have seen the following interview with Don Davis from years ago, but I thought it provided some interesting insight into the scoring process.
    http://www.ign.com/articles/2000/07/17/interview-with-composer-don-davis-part-3-of-4
    PLUME: On a side note to Horner, you worked with him on Titanic. There was a very famous rift between Horner and James Cameron after Aliens. Was any residual of that evident in what you observed between Horner and Cameron on Titanic? It was originally a falling out based on their differing views on the music for Aliens, wasn't it?

    DAVIS: No, I think it was a little more than that. It was music too, but Jim Cameron is a very tough guy to work for. Actually, I gained a lot of respect for Horner during Titanic, because Horner was accommodating Cameron in ways that I thought a composer the stature of Horner had no reason to accommodate anyone. He completely handled the situation with absolute humility and professionalism. I don't think there are very many composers who would have acquiesced to Jim Cameron the way Horner did. Horner gave Jim exactly what he wanted. I think there are some people who think that the Titanic score may be overly simplistic, or some people object to the Celtic nature of it, or whatever, but I can tell you that if any other composer had scored that picture, Jim would have fired him and at least four other composers before he got what he wanted. Horner was determined that that would not happen, and it didn't happen, and I think it was the best score that Jim would ever allow into that picture. For that reason, I think he deserves all the Academy Awards and accolades that he got.

    PLUME: I think that's a perspective that not very many people saw in that.

    DAVIS: Well, you kind-of had to be there to see it. I mean, it was magnificent.

    PLUME: It was surprising to a lot of people that Horner would even work with Cameron again after Aliens.

    DAVIS: I can't really say, because I wasn't there all that much. I would go to Horner's place, pick up the sketches, he'd talk me through them, I'd do them, and I was done. I do know that I made a lot of extra money on that show, because the picture kept changing and Cameron kept making changes, and as the sketches changed, they kept coming back to me to change the orchestration and I'd get more money. That was just fine as far as I was concerned. Through that process, I could see that he was accommodating this director. He was really bending over backwards to do everything that Jim wanted him to do. I couldn't picture a composer of the stature of John Williams doing that, well, maybe he would but there gets to be a point when it's too much.

    PLUME: Isn't it the job of the composer to conform to the director's view of the film? What line is there that demarcates when it's not worth the hassle?

    DAVIS: There are situations where directors give composers directives just to give them directives. Just to show "who's boss in this room."

    PLUME: Is it the film version of busy work?
    DAVIS: Sure. Go outside and dig a 20-foot hole and then fill it up again. Composers, whether they are or not, certainly like to view themselves as being creative and having a contribution to make to the process. There are some personalities, fortunately they are few, that seem to want to negate that. There's a point where it becomes too much of an insult to bear. If a composer is very highly successful, and James Horner certainly is, that means that he has to take less of that kind of abuse than a composer who is not of that stature. From my limited vantage point, it seemed like changes were coming in just for the sake of changes to come in, and I was wondering, as I was picking up these changed sketches, why Horner was going to such lengths to make this guy happy. Once the film came out, I understood perfectly. That's another tribute to James Horner, because he has not only an amazing visceral insight into what a film needs musically, but he knows how these situations work and he knows when to do something and when not to do something. You've got to hand it to the guy.
  21. Like
    MikeH got a reaction from Wojo in How do we feel about James Horner's Titanic?   
    Do tell!
    I enjoyed Tony Hinnigan's story from one of the Willow scoring sessions:
    James Horner had heard the score for "The Mission" and asked Mike Taylor and myself to play on "Willow", which had, at the time, the biggest ever music budget for a movie. On the first morning we began with a cue containing a nightmare solo in the heinous key of B Major. (For the uninitiated, that means a rather uncomfortable number of sharps). We only had one instrument between us on which it could be done - a somewhat dodgy cross-blown Bolivian flute. We tossed a coin for the dubious honour. Mike lost. The first run-through, predictably, didn't go that well. Audible sniggers were heard from members of the London Symphony Orchestra. James, to his eternal credit, tapped his baton on the stand and said "Ladies and Gentlemen, we have a 120-piece orchestra here, two choirs, Alpine horns, anvils etc., etc., and these chaps with numerous bits of stick, some of which have holes bored in them. I have written the cue in the wrong key and that's my fault. If anyone thinks they can play any of these instruments better, please step forward". You could've heard a pin drop.
  22. Like
    MikeH reacted to JoeinAR in Do you remember what was the first Williams scored film you ever saw?   
    saw it a bunch of times at the theatre, Remember the first time we saw it. It was February 1975, I was 14. We went to the theatre and got tickets that afternoon for the 7-ish showing. We got home just as a huge tornado barely missed our home. Still went to the show. It had a huge 70 foot curved screen. The film had an intermission. Last one I remember. I remember before I saw the movie I had come home from school one day and there were 3 records on my bed that my Mom had picked up at Walmart for me, the Towering Inferno, Earthquake, and Airport 1975. I loved the Towering Inferno score before I ever saw the movie.
  23. Like
    MikeH reacted to Naïve Old Fart in Do you remember what was the first Williams scored film you ever saw?   
    "The Towering Inferno", 5 times at the cinema from 1975-1976. Magnificent!
    The score is still in my top-3, and long may it remain there.
  24. Like
    MikeH got a reaction from Marian Schedenig in How do we feel about James Horner's Titanic?   
    Do tell!
    I enjoyed Tony Hinnigan's story from one of the Willow scoring sessions:
    James Horner had heard the score for "The Mission" and asked Mike Taylor and myself to play on "Willow", which had, at the time, the biggest ever music budget for a movie. On the first morning we began with a cue containing a nightmare solo in the heinous key of B Major. (For the uninitiated, that means a rather uncomfortable number of sharps). We only had one instrument between us on which it could be done - a somewhat dodgy cross-blown Bolivian flute. We tossed a coin for the dubious honour. Mike lost. The first run-through, predictably, didn't go that well. Audible sniggers were heard from members of the London Symphony Orchestra. James, to his eternal credit, tapped his baton on the stand and said "Ladies and Gentlemen, we have a 120-piece orchestra here, two choirs, Alpine horns, anvils etc., etc., and these chaps with numerous bits of stick, some of which have holes bored in them. I have written the cue in the wrong key and that's my fault. If anyone thinks they can play any of these instruments better, please step forward". You could've heard a pin drop.
  25. Like
    MikeH got a reaction from Smeltington in How do we feel about James Horner's Titanic?   
    Terrific score. I don't know how many have seen the following interview with Don Davis from years ago, but I thought it provided some interesting insight into the scoring process.
    http://www.ign.com/articles/2000/07/17/interview-with-composer-don-davis-part-3-of-4
    PLUME: On a side note to Horner, you worked with him on Titanic. There was a very famous rift between Horner and James Cameron after Aliens. Was any residual of that evident in what you observed between Horner and Cameron on Titanic? It was originally a falling out based on their differing views on the music for Aliens, wasn't it?

    DAVIS: No, I think it was a little more than that. It was music too, but Jim Cameron is a very tough guy to work for. Actually, I gained a lot of respect for Horner during Titanic, because Horner was accommodating Cameron in ways that I thought a composer the stature of Horner had no reason to accommodate anyone. He completely handled the situation with absolute humility and professionalism. I don't think there are very many composers who would have acquiesced to Jim Cameron the way Horner did. Horner gave Jim exactly what he wanted. I think there are some people who think that the Titanic score may be overly simplistic, or some people object to the Celtic nature of it, or whatever, but I can tell you that if any other composer had scored that picture, Jim would have fired him and at least four other composers before he got what he wanted. Horner was determined that that would not happen, and it didn't happen, and I think it was the best score that Jim would ever allow into that picture. For that reason, I think he deserves all the Academy Awards and accolades that he got.

    PLUME: I think that's a perspective that not very many people saw in that.

    DAVIS: Well, you kind-of had to be there to see it. I mean, it was magnificent.

    PLUME: It was surprising to a lot of people that Horner would even work with Cameron again after Aliens.

    DAVIS: I can't really say, because I wasn't there all that much. I would go to Horner's place, pick up the sketches, he'd talk me through them, I'd do them, and I was done. I do know that I made a lot of extra money on that show, because the picture kept changing and Cameron kept making changes, and as the sketches changed, they kept coming back to me to change the orchestration and I'd get more money. That was just fine as far as I was concerned. Through that process, I could see that he was accommodating this director. He was really bending over backwards to do everything that Jim wanted him to do. I couldn't picture a composer of the stature of John Williams doing that, well, maybe he would but there gets to be a point when it's too much.

    PLUME: Isn't it the job of the composer to conform to the director's view of the film? What line is there that demarcates when it's not worth the hassle?

    DAVIS: There are situations where directors give composers directives just to give them directives. Just to show "who's boss in this room."

    PLUME: Is it the film version of busy work?
    DAVIS: Sure. Go outside and dig a 20-foot hole and then fill it up again. Composers, whether they are or not, certainly like to view themselves as being creative and having a contribution to make to the process. There are some personalities, fortunately they are few, that seem to want to negate that. There's a point where it becomes too much of an insult to bear. If a composer is very highly successful, and James Horner certainly is, that means that he has to take less of that kind of abuse than a composer who is not of that stature. From my limited vantage point, it seemed like changes were coming in just for the sake of changes to come in, and I was wondering, as I was picking up these changed sketches, why Horner was going to such lengths to make this guy happy. Once the film came out, I understood perfectly. That's another tribute to James Horner, because he has not only an amazing visceral insight into what a film needs musically, but he knows how these situations work and he knows when to do something and when not to do something. You've got to hand it to the guy.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.