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igger6

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  1. Haha
    igger6 reacted to Brando in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Everytime I go into this thread there’s a brand new update, completely and entirely different from the last, which then unfolds into a new story as to what’s going on. Everyday there’s a new story about how this music was written. It’s incredible. It’s the best mystery novel I’ve ever read.
  2. Like
    igger6 reacted to p0llux in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    I just started listening to the Obi-Wan Album. Track 1 is Williams' Obi-Wan theme. Track 2 is the opening Order 66 action music from ep1. I'm still cringing from the sharp contrast in styles. From beautiful sweeping orchestral to modern RCP banging drums and brass. Just like when I first heard it, hearing that opening action cue just sets the precedent for the rest of score and it's a harsh reminder of what modern film scoring has become.
  3. Haha
    igger6 reacted to Andy in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Trying to get this straight.
     
    Deborah Chow told Holt to compose as though they're not allowed to use JW themes, because they are looking into it.
     
    JW is brought in to compose Obi Theme, and William Ross is given the okay to use themes, but only in the last episode.
     
    Doug Adams implies yesterday on Twitter that withholding his themes in the Obi Score is consistent with JW being unhappy with Giacchino using his themes on Rogue One, which was then quickly rescored.
     
    Doug also implies that that's why Williams took greater interest in Solo, after not being asked to score Rogue One himself.
     
    James Southall tweets that the above is false, that John Williams indeed does NOT get possessive about how and where his themes are used in LFL projects.
     

     
     
  4. Thanks
    igger6 reacted to Luke Skywalker in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    When was yodas theme in the show? Holt mentions it in a recent interview doesnt she?
  5. Like
    igger6 reacted to Luke Skywalker in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Damn i want to hear the alternative rogue one filled with williams themes. It sounds just like what I expected.
     
    was it recorded? Would williams read the cue sheets? Was it completely deleted just in case?
     
    i am sure giacchino would not have made a literal cut and paste job. We would have had more imperial motif and march where it was due, and more rebel fanfare 🙁
  6. Haha
    igger6 reacted to greenturnedblue in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    And then after that, they will ask Phil Lord and Christopher Miller for help bringing a lighter more improv style to set
  7. Haha
    igger6 reacted to greenturnedblue in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Next thing you know theyll be bringing Gareth Edwards aboard, coming full circle
  8. Haha
    igger6 reacted to LSH in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    There'll always be someone to patch up the patcher. And they will inevitably find themselves patched.
  9. Like
    igger6 reacted to Tydirium in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    It's not just about how Haab's writing sounds more like JW, though; why are almost all of the video game scores getting recorded with the LSO? Why should the orchestra in the Battlefront and Fallen Order games sound more like the orchestra of the OT and the PT (because it's literally the same one), than the orchestra that performed in Obi-Wan Kenobi—the show that is essentially Episode 3.5? It makes no sense to me.
  10. Haha
    igger6 reacted to Tom in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Wait a minute.  I just finished this damn thing and Daisy never showed up. What the hell?   Oh, and you can't use my themes.
  11. Like
    igger6 reacted to LSH in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    But Powell quoted significant amounts of legacy material in Solo (really well, I must add; I discover more little hidden phrases with each Iisten). 
     
    Why would this show have been different?
  12. Like
    igger6 got a reaction from ThePenitentMan1 in What are your thoughts on John Williams' new theme for Obi-Wan?   
    Exceptionally well-put.  That's exactly what it felt like.  My God, what might have been, with a production team that cared about honoring that sound and a composer capable of producing it!
  13. Like
    igger6 reacted to Andy in Williams expects to complete the Indiana Jones 5 score "this year"   
    While walking the dog, I was thinking...
     
    Wouldn't it have been cool if the March were revised with each film, but the revisions retained and new revisions added to accumulate
     
    ROTLA - The Standard March
    TOD - Add Shorty's Theme [this was done]
    TLC -  Keep Shorty's Theme and Bring in the Keeping Up With The Joneses
    KOTCS - Retain all previous additions and modify March for Mutt's motifs [as was done in the last few minutes of the End Credits]
     
    You'd have an ever-evolving, growing march with little thematic counterpoints, collecting with each film.  Essentially each piece an artifact taking its place on the "Museum Shelf" of the Raiders March.
     
  14. Like
    igger6 reacted to enderdrag64 in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Say what you want about the MCU's lack of thematic consistency and unmemorability of some of its films' music, but there are some films in it that have some pretty great scores. They are also usually very orchestral, much moreso than a lot of other modern films. Consider Patrick Doyle's Thor score, Alan Silvestri's Avengers score, Ghiaccino's Doctor Strange and Spider-man trilogy scores. 
  15. Like
    igger6 reacted to Alex in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Fair, but I think the fact that Holt had written an Obi theme already, and suddenly JW comes on board, and Ross takes over all the adaptations could be a sign. With Solo, John Powell knew of JW´s involvement well in advance. Also, how bad it would look to give the boot to the only woman to score a Star Wars project. I do not think we´ll ever really know what happened tbh.
     
    I have no problem with Holt by the way. Just the wrong person for this project. I liked Loki.
  16. Like
    igger6 reacted to Alex in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Something tells me Kathleen Kennedy wasn´t as hands on with Kenobi as she normally is with Star Wars projects (what with Mando, Ahsoka, Andor in production etc) and so she let Chow just get on with it. Then, maybe, she came to have a look at what was going on, heard the score, went "What the f*** is this?", panicked, called JW, JW goes, "Yeah, no thanks, I´ll give you a theme, but that´s it", then they get Bill Ross involved to adapt the theme and write additional music. What a mess.
  17. Haha
    igger6 reacted to Counterparts in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    I coulda sworn i heard a variant of it later.
    Finn's Confession
  18. Thanks
    igger6 reacted to Falstaft in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    One of the things that irks me the most is the bait-and-switch its marketing perpetuated with Prequel era music. How many of us allowed ourselves to build expectations for hearing DotF, BotH, and friends after that first trailer--despite knowing full well that trailer music is rarely a reflection of the actual film/show score. 
     
    For a program that was supposedly a love letter to those who cherished the long-maligned Episodes 1-3, you'd think there'd be a willingness to draw from one of the few aspects of those movies that people unequivocally hold in high regard. But as it stands, we perversely got more Ep 1-3 musical references in Sequel Trilogy, which was at times insultingly blatant in its antipathy to the PT ("this will begin to make things right" -- ugh!), than in a show literally about the characters, themes, and unfinished business of TPM/AOTC/ROTS.
     
    What are we left with?: some repeated minor trumpet chords and goddawful choral sample that maybe was intended to evoke Battle of the Heroes, and a variant of the Obi Wan theme that, by sheer virtue of the consistency of Williams's melodic language, kind of resembles Qui Gon's motif if you really want it to.
     
    I've said it before, but how profound would a tiny hint of Across the Stars have been when Obi Wan was circumlocuting about Padme? This is what leitmotifs are for, stating in emotional terms what characters cannot in words, connecting events of the past to developments in the present, deepening a scene rather than simply underscoring it. How many other such opportunities for musical commentary, resonance, storytelling were missed?
     
    If there's one thing that's slightly reassuring, it's that it's not just film score obsessives like us that feel like something was off musically. I've seen a heartening, if simultaneously depressing, awareness of the issue in the broader conversation around the show as well.
     
    None of this, by the way, is to disparage Holt's music, much of which is fine scoring indeed, and a welcome addition to the SW musical canon (especially Young Leia's theme, the Mapuzo arrival, and Tala's death). She was dealt a difficult hand, moreso than I think many of us fully appreciate.
  19. Thanks
    igger6 got a reaction from ThePenitentMan1 in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  20. Like
    igger6 got a reaction from Falstaft in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  21. Thanks
    igger6 got a reaction from Andy in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  22. Like
    igger6 got a reaction from May the Force be with You in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  23. Like
    igger6 got a reaction from Holko in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  24. Like
    igger6 got a reaction from Cerebral Cortex in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  25. Thanks
    igger6 got a reaction from Tiburon in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
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