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Nick Parker

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  1. Like
    Nick Parker reacted to Holko in Star Wars IX The Rise of Skywalker (JJ Abrams 2019)   
    Now these two videos are absolutely fantastic, filled with well-reasoned valid points.
     
     
  2. Like
    Nick Parker got a reaction from SteveMc in So Ridley Scott is directing a Prometheus sequel... (The official Alien: Covenant Thread)   
    I guess my ultimate question in response to your question is "Does there need to be a point?" One of the greatest appeals of science/speculative fiction has always been how it takes the intangible and often presents it in a literal, present reality. I don't think it's necessary to come up with a "conclusion", as long as the idea(s) are explored in an interesting or compelling way. Speaking as neutrally as possible given the subject matter of Prometheus, the likelihood of us as humans meeting and directly interacting with our hypothetical creator is next to none, but here in this film we have the opportunity to daydream and imagine how might that encounter play out. In Prometheus' case, things don't go so hot for us--much different than the typical compassionate creator found in Shaw's Christianity, and of course, in keeping with the film's title, David ultimately usurps the mantle of creator for himself.
     
    For myself, just watching all that play out, again, in a literal way is fun, and if it's a subject that compels you, I think there are a number of interesting questions you could take away from the film: if we were created from an entity, does that creator regard as its children? Is it obligated to care for us? We have constructed countless creation myths, where we have communicated with our creators...is that something we'd actually want? Did our creator have a creator of its own? Furthermore, does that imply that we, too, could act as creators further down the chain? What's to stop that chain? (As seen through the creation of David, who in turn creates what becomes the xenomorph.) What does all that say about our place in the universe?
     
     
    These are all just questions off the top of my head, based on my one viewing of the film nine years ago at the cinema. Again, I'm not giving the movie a free pass for its problems, and I don't think all of its questions _were_ explored in an interesting way. This is _not_ one of my favorite movies by any means, and really, I wouldn't think about it if I didn't see it discussed here on JWFan. But I also think it's only fair to give the film credit for genuinely posing these questions at all in such a bold way--tragically rare in modern Hollywood, even by 2012 standards--and for inviting people to ponder and discuss them. If you don't think it's a compelling line of thought, that's cool, but I don't think it's right to then say that there's nothing really there.
  3. Haha
    Nick Parker got a reaction from Nick1Ø66 in So Ridley Scott is directing a Prometheus sequel... (The official Alien: Covenant Thread)   
    You're a robot! You're a goddamn robot!
  4. Like
    Nick Parker got a reaction from SteveMc in The Official Pop and Rock Music thread   
    On the tangentail subject of Pink Floyd, I've been fixated on these ten seconds for the last few days: 
     
     
     
    The nonstop major chord phrases cascading into that B minor resolution, the bass synth punctuating them until it finally holds at that chord, the lyrics (I also love how the music opens up with the words "clear blue sky").........
     
    I'm not a Pink Floyd fan, but this might be one of my favorite little musical moments ever.
  5. Like
    Nick Parker got a reaction from Holko in The Official Pop and Rock Music thread   
    On the tangentail subject of Pink Floyd, I've been fixated on these ten seconds for the last few days: 
     
     
     
    The nonstop major chord phrases cascading into that B minor resolution, the bass synth punctuating them until it finally holds at that chord, the lyrics (I also love how the music opens up with the words "clear blue sky").........
     
    I'm not a Pink Floyd fan, but this might be one of my favorite little musical moments ever.
  6. Like
    Nick Parker got a reaction from Naïve Old Fart in The Official Pop and Rock Music thread   
    On the tangentail subject of Pink Floyd, I've been fixated on these ten seconds for the last few days: 
     
     
     
    The nonstop major chord phrases cascading into that B minor resolution, the bass synth punctuating them until it finally holds at that chord, the lyrics (I also love how the music opens up with the words "clear blue sky").........
     
    I'm not a Pink Floyd fan, but this might be one of my favorite little musical moments ever.
  7. Haha
    Nick Parker reacted to Koray Savas in Hans Zimmer Appreciation Thread   
    Hans Zimmer had nothing to do with Metal Gear Solid. 
     
    Whoops, turns out I’ve never heard of this series. 
  8. Like
    Nick Parker got a reaction from mstrox in So Ridley Scott is directing a Prometheus sequel... (The official Alien: Covenant Thread)   
    I guess my ultimate question in response to your question is "Does there need to be a point?" One of the greatest appeals of science/speculative fiction has always been how it takes the intangible and often presents it in a literal, present reality. I don't think it's necessary to come up with a "conclusion", as long as the idea(s) are explored in an interesting or compelling way. Speaking as neutrally as possible given the subject matter of Prometheus, the likelihood of us as humans meeting and directly interacting with our hypothetical creator is next to none, but here in this film we have the opportunity to daydream and imagine how might that encounter play out. In Prometheus' case, things don't go so hot for us--much different than the typical compassionate creator found in Shaw's Christianity, and of course, in keeping with the film's title, David ultimately usurps the mantle of creator for himself.
     
    For myself, just watching all that play out, again, in a literal way is fun, and if it's a subject that compels you, I think there are a number of interesting questions you could take away from the film: if we were created from an entity, does that creator regard as its children? Is it obligated to care for us? We have constructed countless creation myths, where we have communicated with our creators...is that something we'd actually want? Did our creator have a creator of its own? Furthermore, does that imply that we, too, could act as creators further down the chain? What's to stop that chain? (As seen through the creation of David, who in turn creates what becomes the xenomorph.) What does all that say about our place in the universe?
     
     
    These are all just questions off the top of my head, based on my one viewing of the film nine years ago at the cinema. Again, I'm not giving the movie a free pass for its problems, and I don't think all of its questions _were_ explored in an interesting way. This is _not_ one of my favorite movies by any means, and really, I wouldn't think about it if I didn't see it discussed here on JWFan. But I also think it's only fair to give the film credit for genuinely posing these questions at all in such a bold way--tragically rare in modern Hollywood, even by 2012 standards--and for inviting people to ponder and discuss them. If you don't think it's a compelling line of thought, that's cool, but I don't think it's right to then say that there's nothing really there.
  9. Like
    Nick Parker reacted to Nick1Ø66 in So Ridley Scott is directing a Prometheus sequel... (The official Alien: Covenant Thread)   
    I don't think anyone is being asked to "justify" an opinion, merely to articulate one.
     
    If someone says "this is meaningful", don't be surprised if they're asked "how so"? If they don't want to expand on that, fine. But if you (and that's a rhetorical "you") can't explain what you mean, people are going to take that into account when they decide how much weight and frankly, respect, they're going to give what you have to say. This is a discussion forum after all.
  10. Thanks
    Nick Parker got a reaction from Smeltington in So Ridley Scott is directing a Prometheus sequel... (The official Alien: Covenant Thread)   
    I guess my ultimate question in response to your question is "Does there need to be a point?" One of the greatest appeals of science/speculative fiction has always been how it takes the intangible and often presents it in a literal, present reality. I don't think it's necessary to come up with a "conclusion", as long as the idea(s) are explored in an interesting or compelling way. Speaking as neutrally as possible given the subject matter of Prometheus, the likelihood of us as humans meeting and directly interacting with our hypothetical creator is next to none, but here in this film we have the opportunity to daydream and imagine how might that encounter play out. In Prometheus' case, things don't go so hot for us--much different than the typical compassionate creator found in Shaw's Christianity, and of course, in keeping with the film's title, David ultimately usurps the mantle of creator for himself.
     
    For myself, just watching all that play out, again, in a literal way is fun, and if it's a subject that compels you, I think there are a number of interesting questions you could take away from the film: if we were created from an entity, does that creator regard as its children? Is it obligated to care for us? We have constructed countless creation myths, where we have communicated with our creators...is that something we'd actually want? Did our creator have a creator of its own? Furthermore, does that imply that we, too, could act as creators further down the chain? What's to stop that chain? (As seen through the creation of David, who in turn creates what becomes the xenomorph.) What does all that say about our place in the universe?
     
     
    These are all just questions off the top of my head, based on my one viewing of the film nine years ago at the cinema. Again, I'm not giving the movie a free pass for its problems, and I don't think all of its questions _were_ explored in an interesting way. This is _not_ one of my favorite movies by any means, and really, I wouldn't think about it if I didn't see it discussed here on JWFan. But I also think it's only fair to give the film credit for genuinely posing these questions at all in such a bold way--tragically rare in modern Hollywood, even by 2012 standards--and for inviting people to ponder and discuss them. If you don't think it's a compelling line of thought, that's cool, but I don't think it's right to then say that there's nothing really there.
  11. Thanks
    Nick Parker got a reaction from crumbs in So Ridley Scott is directing a Prometheus sequel... (The official Alien: Covenant Thread)   
    I guess my ultimate question in response to your question is "Does there need to be a point?" One of the greatest appeals of science/speculative fiction has always been how it takes the intangible and often presents it in a literal, present reality. I don't think it's necessary to come up with a "conclusion", as long as the idea(s) are explored in an interesting or compelling way. Speaking as neutrally as possible given the subject matter of Prometheus, the likelihood of us as humans meeting and directly interacting with our hypothetical creator is next to none, but here in this film we have the opportunity to daydream and imagine how might that encounter play out. In Prometheus' case, things don't go so hot for us--much different than the typical compassionate creator found in Shaw's Christianity, and of course, in keeping with the film's title, David ultimately usurps the mantle of creator for himself.
     
    For myself, just watching all that play out, again, in a literal way is fun, and if it's a subject that compels you, I think there are a number of interesting questions you could take away from the film: if we were created from an entity, does that creator regard as its children? Is it obligated to care for us? We have constructed countless creation myths, where we have communicated with our creators...is that something we'd actually want? Did our creator have a creator of its own? Furthermore, does that imply that we, too, could act as creators further down the chain? What's to stop that chain? (As seen through the creation of David, who in turn creates what becomes the xenomorph.) What does all that say about our place in the universe?
     
     
    These are all just questions off the top of my head, based on my one viewing of the film nine years ago at the cinema. Again, I'm not giving the movie a free pass for its problems, and I don't think all of its questions _were_ explored in an interesting way. This is _not_ one of my favorite movies by any means, and really, I wouldn't think about it if I didn't see it discussed here on JWFan. But I also think it's only fair to give the film credit for genuinely posing these questions at all in such a bold way--tragically rare in modern Hollywood, even by 2012 standards--and for inviting people to ponder and discuss them. If you don't think it's a compelling line of thought, that's cool, but I don't think it's right to then say that there's nothing really there.
  12. Thanks
    Nick Parker got a reaction from GerateWohl in So Ridley Scott is directing a Prometheus sequel... (The official Alien: Covenant Thread)   
    I guess my ultimate question in response to your question is "Does there need to be a point?" One of the greatest appeals of science/speculative fiction has always been how it takes the intangible and often presents it in a literal, present reality. I don't think it's necessary to come up with a "conclusion", as long as the idea(s) are explored in an interesting or compelling way. Speaking as neutrally as possible given the subject matter of Prometheus, the likelihood of us as humans meeting and directly interacting with our hypothetical creator is next to none, but here in this film we have the opportunity to daydream and imagine how might that encounter play out. In Prometheus' case, things don't go so hot for us--much different than the typical compassionate creator found in Shaw's Christianity, and of course, in keeping with the film's title, David ultimately usurps the mantle of creator for himself.
     
    For myself, just watching all that play out, again, in a literal way is fun, and if it's a subject that compels you, I think there are a number of interesting questions you could take away from the film: if we were created from an entity, does that creator regard as its children? Is it obligated to care for us? We have constructed countless creation myths, where we have communicated with our creators...is that something we'd actually want? Did our creator have a creator of its own? Furthermore, does that imply that we, too, could act as creators further down the chain? What's to stop that chain? (As seen through the creation of David, who in turn creates what becomes the xenomorph.) What does all that say about our place in the universe?
     
     
    These are all just questions off the top of my head, based on my one viewing of the film nine years ago at the cinema. Again, I'm not giving the movie a free pass for its problems, and I don't think all of its questions _were_ explored in an interesting way. This is _not_ one of my favorite movies by any means, and really, I wouldn't think about it if I didn't see it discussed here on JWFan. But I also think it's only fair to give the film credit for genuinely posing these questions at all in such a bold way--tragically rare in modern Hollywood, even by 2012 standards--and for inviting people to ponder and discuss them. If you don't think it's a compelling line of thought, that's cool, but I don't think it's right to then say that there's nothing really there.
  13. Like
  14. Like
  15. Surprised
  16. Like
    Nick Parker reacted to Naïve Old Fart in So Ridley Scott is directing a Prometheus sequel... (The official Alien: Covenant Thread)   
    That's just it. I don't think that it is "so bad", or, indeed, bad, at all.
    What I'm more interested in, is knowing why Thor refuses to engage, on this subject. I always thought that all posts on any subject were "serious". Yes, some can be a little facetious at times (I hold my hands up, here), but, imo, all posts in all threads, are inherently serious. All posts are trying to make some sort of point.
  17. Haha
  18. Like
    Nick Parker got a reaction from Edmilson in Joker (Hildur Guðnadóttir)   
    Not that writing a "compassionate" score is the only alternative, of course. Taxi Driver is a very rich score, for example, that does so much. It gives the down to earth bustle of NYC a larger than life presence as Bickle's manifested hell and purgatory. The theme has a longing for innocence and romance that is like a landmark we hear to see just how far Bickle's plummet into madness goes, until the theme itself drops down with him at the climax.
     
    For Joker, I thought it would've been really cool if they took an approach similar to Shirley Walker in the animated series:
     
     
    The juxtaposition between the sitcom breeziness of the music with Arthur's increasing disillusionment and insanity would've been so badass!
  19. Like
    Nick Parker got a reaction from Not Mr. Big in Kingdom of the Crystal Skull retrospective   
    The approach Williams took for Irina really isn't that different from Indy if you think about it: the music is bright and heroic, which are not traits you'd really give to the character, particularly in Raiders. However, the theme perfectly encapsulates the experience they (Spielberg and Williams) wanted to give to the audience, and there are multiple times where Indy personifies this feeling of adventure and heroic feats...if adventure has a name?
     
    Irina?...Williams was just trying to find something to latch onto, 'cause there are practically no instances outside of the opening sequence,  as said above, where she displays any sense of seduction, nor does the film capture that tone at all. Plus, Williams found her sexy.
  20. Like
    Nick Parker got a reaction from Holko in Joker (Hildur Guðnadóttir)   
    Not that writing a "compassionate" score is the only alternative, of course. Taxi Driver is a very rich score, for example, that does so much. It gives the down to earth bustle of NYC a larger than life presence as Bickle's manifested hell and purgatory. The theme has a longing for innocence and romance that is like a landmark we hear to see just how far Bickle's plummet into madness goes, until the theme itself drops down with him at the climax.
     
    For Joker, I thought it would've been really cool if they took an approach similar to Shirley Walker in the animated series:
     
     
    The juxtaposition between the sitcom breeziness of the music with Arthur's increasing disillusionment and insanity would've been so badass!
  21. Like
    Nick Parker reacted to 80sFan in "Wide Receiver" aka NBC Sunday Night Football Theme (Concert Version)   
    Jim Nova (https://jimnova.com/about/) is a huge John Williams fan and is a trombonist in the Pittsburgh Symphony.  
     
    I was looking at his YouTube page (https://www.youtube.com/user/jn1578) and came across this:
     
     
     
    Fun video and a great performance!
     
    ----------------------------------------------------------
    From the YouTube page
    Turns out that many S.E. Shires trombone artists are huge football fans! So I decided to take my trombone arrangement of the NBC Football Theme, Wide Receiver, by John Williams (of course!) and expand it into a 10 part version! We all may root for different NFL teams, but we're all on the Shires Team!
     
    Musicians
    Joe Alessi
    Megan Boutin
    Jeremy Branson
    Justin Cook
    Brian Hecht
    Ross Holcombe
    Martin McCain
    Jim Nova
    Alexis Smith
    Nate Zgonc
     
    https://www.seshires.com/ourtrombones
    ----------------------------------------------------------
  22. Like
    Nick Parker got a reaction from ConorPower in Kingdom of the Crystal Skull retrospective   
    The approach Williams took for Irina really isn't that different from Indy if you think about it: the music is bright and heroic, which are not traits you'd really give to the character, particularly in Raiders. However, the theme perfectly encapsulates the experience they (Spielberg and Williams) wanted to give to the audience, and there are multiple times where Indy personifies this feeling of adventure and heroic feats...if adventure has a name?
     
    Irina?...Williams was just trying to find something to latch onto, 'cause there are practically no instances outside of the opening sequence,  as said above, where she displays any sense of seduction, nor does the film capture that tone at all. Plus, Williams found her sexy.
  23. Like
  24. Love
    Nick Parker got a reaction from Koray Savas in What's the most evil soundtrack that you know of?   
    Did I ever tell you that you know the way to my heart?
  25. Haha
    Nick Parker got a reaction from crumbs in John Williams interview on Steinway & Sons website   
    Like Williams said in the interview, his concert works and film works form a symbiotic circle, what happens to one of them will affect the other. You must understand this.
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