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Naïve Old Fart

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Everything posted by Naïve Old Fart

  1. So it's what I said: it is on "Coda". What I sais was true...from a certain point of view...
  2. That's what Jason meant, Koray; it might be on "Coda", but it's not on "ITTOD". In the same way, why the hell is "Inside And Out" not on "Wind And Wuthering", nor "Do The Neurotic" not on "Invisible Touch"?
  3. Pretty sure Shore is already working on it. Good news, if he is. I thought he and Jackson weren't talking after the "King Kong" fiasco?
  4. This isn't really what Star Wars says... at all. In that case, Henry, what are its central themes?
  5. Odd that part 3 should e the sharpest, since parts 2 and 3 were filmed back-to-back. I'll check it out when I can afford a Blu-ray player...in about 10 years
  6. The one ting about "The Hobbit" that I would like to see, is that I would like to see Martin Freeman morph into Ian Holm at he end of the film, to provide continuity with LOTR. I'd also like to hear a Howard Shore score, but I'm hoping against hope, there.
  7. Perhaps this is a topic for a Star Wars site, but a) I don't know any, b) I'm not that sad, and c) Mr. L. would probably take it down, such is his protection of his little baby. So much has been said about the cultural impact of this series of films. Its contribution to cinema is beyond doubt: the score made the general public aware-perhaps for the first time since the mid-sixties-of an large, effective orchestral score, and the invention, in 1976, of motion control made cinematic dreams a reality. Peel away the (very pretty) layers of skin, however, and what have you got? A modern-day fairytale, perhaps, or a indictment of consumerist society (let's not forget the central irony of the entire series:it takes $420,000,000 to say that possessions are not important)? So just what is it about Star Wars that keeps bringing people back to it, time after time? Is it any good? Is there a place for films such as Star Wars now? What makes it a global phenomenon? Is its success directly attributable to the end of the Vietnam war, and the doldrums that the USA had gotten itself into? Did it really save Hollywood, and the 70s, or is it all clever wise-after-the-event hype? Does the world need Star Wars now? Would the world have been better off without it then? Does anyone care? WHAT MAKES IT SO DAMN POPULAR?! C'mon, folks; get scribbling.
  8. Ah, now, you might be right, there! I have not heard the 4-disc COP set, but anyway, wasn't "Black Sunday" from that set, the awful 1993 release? "TTI" main title is much better than the RNSO version. It would be nice to hear the "Dracula" stuff in digital stereo, instead of the audio fog that is the (so-called) original soundtrack.
  9. If you like "Five Sacred Trees", then try "Heartwood". It's the polar opposite, but it's no less effective.
  10. IMO, The City of Prague has better luck with Goldsmith, rather than Williams. Its rendition of "The Bees Arrive" is rather good.
  11. Ehh you're not that old, my first soundtrack purchase was in 1976. Which was..? I feel a bit guilty at saying this, but by 1976, I already had "Earthquake", "TTI", "TES", "Jaws", "TMB", "POTA", and "Yellow Submarine"(sorry!). Ehh you're not that old, my first soundtrack purchase was in 1976. pa lease, 1964, Disney's Cinderella soundtrack from 1950. Alright, the first EVER soundtrack was a gift, and it was Disney's "The Jungle Book", in 1967. I then got the "Trumpton" soundtrack, several Gerry Anderson 33rpm 7-inch records, and a storyteller Yogi Bear record. Even then, I was smarter than your average fan, Boo Boo.
  12. I think that her best performance is in "Dead calm". I also like a BBC serial put out about 20 years ago, called "Bangkok Hilton". It also starred Denholm Elliot.
  13. "The Unfinished Journey"? Don't you mean "The Patriot"?
  14. You can get the ISO score on the DVD, but you get the film version of "Swing, Swing, Swing", without string section.
  15. DCC, mainly for the complete "Desert Chase". The DCC 180gm double-disc virgin vinyl sounds brilliant, especially when played on a Linn LP 12. Ooh, I've just come.
  16. And here it is: http://mahawa.jw-music.net/misc/interview/elley.htm It's still probably the best interview ever done with JW. A must-read for any true JWfan. In 1993, one of the British Sunday papers ran an interview with J.W, under the heading "Hollywood's Top Scorer". Can anyone find it?
  17. I have not heard the "Spartacus" set (I don't have a spare £120!), but I would very much like to. As the greatest J.W. fan in the world (and yes, I CAN qualify that statement! ), there can be only one: THE BLUE BOX.
  18. Huh? Evidence, please, Mark. How about this: Williams was going to score MOAG because his old mucker Steve was going to direct it. When Spielberg bailed, Williams was left in the uncomfortable position of either staying with the film, or following Spielberg, which would not have looked good. The fact that Spielberg is co-exec (or whatever) only just provided Williams with incentive. IMO, Williams would not touch a Rob Marshall film with a ten-feet pole. In the end, though, he provided the best chance for an Oscar winner since SL. Ho hum. I thought it was common knowledge that JW lobbied for MOAG because he loved the book, the director was inconsequential. This is interesting, Charlie. I always thought that J.W. preferred not to read the book or script, because it would "prejudice" his impressions of the film. He has been quoted saying that he preferred to watch-and respond to- the film. Has he changed his MO? Of course, I could be talking bullshit, because he started working on CE3K in 1976...
  19. I agree. Rarely has a collection of outtakes hung together as good as this (although "Physical Graffiti" works just fine... ). Special kudos must go to "Bonzo's Montreux", and all the stuff from "In Through The Out Door". I think I'll play "Carouselambra"...
  20. I agree with everything you said, Mark. The score like the film has become a "guilty pleasure". Let's not forget that the film was once the most successful ever released, but was not acknowleged as such, because of "Jaws" coming along six months later. My favourite tracks are "Let There Be Light", and "Waking Up". The slow statement of the "hero" theme, as it rains on those in the Promenade Room, is sublime. What about it? I like the score, but I also like Legrand's rejected score, which is, quite often, the more interesting listen. Given the style of the film, though, IMO, Legrand's score would not have fitted the film at all.
  21. Huh? Evidence, please, Mark. How about this: Williams was going to score MOAG because his old mucker Steve was going to direct it. When Spielberg bailed, Williams was left in the uncomfortable position of either staying with the film, or following Spielberg, which would not have looked good. The fact that Spielberg is co-exec (or whatever) only just provided Williams with incentive. IMO, Williams would not touch a Rob Marshall film with a ten-feet pole. In the end, though, he provided the best chance for an Oscar winner since SL. Ho hum. Have to disagree there, Mark. IMO, it would have ended like the Richard Lester/"Superman II" fiasco. Qiute so. It's bloody awful.
  22. Thank you. The Pound is dying, soon you will embrace the Euro. NEVER!!!!!!!!!!! (I'm sorry, what was this thread all about..?)
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