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Docteur Qui

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Everything posted by Docteur Qui

  1. Luke literally calls it a "fleeting moment", it's in the text. He experiences a disturbing vision, draws his saber, but then the moment passes and all that is left is the shame. The brevity of the moment is what is important - his emotions and primal instincts completely take over in a split second, and a split second later he sees reason. It's a very human moment but obviously quite heightened (read: space opera). I disagree, we don't need to see what's happened in the 30-year gap because that's not what the story is telling us is important about his character. The last time we saw Luke he had an almost identical moment: when taunted about corrupting Leia by Vader (who at this point he has already committed to redeeming) he is overwhelmed by anger and violently attacks him. It's a shocking moment in that film, and it obviously has stayed with Luke. His reaction to the vision of Ren is a deliberate echo of that moment and demonstrates the lifelong struggle that is mastering our primal emotions, and that is precisely what the text is telling us is important about Luke's character in this particular story. The shame he feels in this moment is infinitely compounded, the subtext is that this time he should have known better, especially as a trained Jedi. The fact he didn't actually attack Ren like he did Vader doesn't matter, certainly not to Ren.
  2. Well, yeah. I remember when Moffat first took over and fans left in droves. I was sitting there going "this is the best thing I've ever seen, what is wrong with you people?". I've grown a bit since, and acknowledge that different strokes etc. There's quite a vocal crowd who love Chibs' run, bless their little hearts. They'll hate RTD2 while we lap it up. That's Doctor Who for you. As I always say, if you don't like it, just wait a few years, then it'll probably be for you.
  3. I think you're right that you can't measure in degrees of conflictedness. But I prefer to think in terms of what's compelling to watch. Luke searching for answers for how to fix the past and inadvertently abandoning his friends doesn't hit me as hard as Luke deliberately abandoning his friends because of the guilt he feels for a fleeting moment of primal and war-like violence. The shame he displays - not only as a result of the moment, but also in how he selfishly justifies the abandonment - is compelling to watch. It's a commentary about how when we (as individuals and as a society) mature our binary ideas about right and wrong become only more muddled and difficult to navigate. The greatest triumph of Luke was removing the burden of shame and redeeming himself with a final, powerful act of nonviolence to counter his earlier struggle, and stand for what is right in the face of the oppressive forces of war and hatred. That, to me, is a story worth telling, especially now. Again, I get why people didn't like it. But it worked very well for me, and helped to push the boundaries for legacy franchises beyond hammering the nostalgia button.
  4. Hermit Luke and his arc was one of the best things about TLJ. That's how you do something new with a bland character who's been around for decades. While I would have loved seeing the original trio interacting with each other their tragic separation and lack of reunion is a more compelling story IMO. It hits extra hard after Fisher's death. I can totally understand why it divided people, but for me it's the fulcrum of the whole trilogy. Had Trevorrow's (flawed, but infinitely superior) script for the third film been realised I genuinely think the sequel trilogy would have gone down much better than it did.
  5. Neither, though I very much like The Unquiet Dead and the camp romp that is The Crimson Horror. Victory of the Daleks is fun as well. His episodes are not excellent, but when I glanced at his output just now I have to say than only Sleep No More is a real clunker, the rest are solid if underwhelming. Hoping for another Maxine Alderton or Jamie Mathieson episode in the new series. I hope they pitch to RTD and he likes them. But I wouldn't be surprised if RTD pens the majority of series 14. I doubt Moffat will return any time soon, as much as I'd love him to. Who knows, he might take over from RTD in 4 years and the whole cycle begins anew. Who nose?
  6. Yeah the last few days has seen a lot of pics from filming doing the rounds on Twitter. The casting announcements were all to get ahead of all that. From what I've seen so far: (huge spoilers) Not only that, but: This special is shaping up to be more bonkers than Day of the Doctor. And more ambitious I might say. So ambitious that I'm starting to wonder if we'll be getting more than just a single, movie-length special, perhaps a few episodes...
  7. It’s a bit disconcerting. RTD could be cavalier with his genocides, but there’s quite big difference when it’s genociding half the universe. Talk about breaking the toys before putting them back in the box.
  8. I wonder if we’ll see any acknowledgement that a good portion of the universe and its in inhabitants were eradicated by the Flux without so much as an “oh well” from the Doctor. That better get wrapped up…
  9. Wow, I can’t imagine Chibnall being able to make 90 minutes work. His episodes are simultaneously rushed and slow as molasses. It’s not like anyone’s dying to see a farewell tour of the companions in the vein of Tennant’s finale, how on earth will he pad out a movie length episode? Not even Day of the Doctor tried for that length (though it could’ve and still would’ve been great). Still, keen to see what he does for his last hurrah, at the very least he’s had a bit more time to write this one. I recently read that the Sea Devils ep was a last-minute script after the BBC demanded an extra episode in 2022, which explains just about everything about it.
  10. They're still worth watching IMO. The good ones have learned from the mistakes of shows past and don't keep you hanging with the same questions, but instead swerve and give you something else entirely (but a bit more gracefully than what "swerve" would suggest). The Leftovers is a prime example. Hoping for the best with Severance.
  11. A few episodes in watching Severance. Gosh I like it. It's got atmosphere in spades, and the visual direction and design is outstanding. Adam Scott is doing some great work here, it's good to see him in such a meaty role. I love how damn unnerving the whole thing is, even if it makes me so anxious I can only watch one episode a day. The whole aesthetic of Lumen, the peculiar nature of the severed characters, and the creepy, silent "board" reminds me of the great and very underrated video game Control. I wonder if it was an influence? Also up to date on the latest ep of Barry. Great to have this show back after so long, Henry Winkler is killing it this season. The second ep wigged me out quite a bit, they're really going full throttle with Barry's character this season.
  12. Ughhhhh let's move on from these insipid conversations shall we.
  13. It's speculated that the Absorbaloff was based on Ian Levine, specifically his penchant for sucking the fun out of fandom and his obsession with canon (i.e. just about every Reddit user in just about every fandom). Before you investigate the wormhole that is Levine, be warned that he's an... interesting individual. Whatever you do, don't listen to "Doctor in Distress", you'll thank me.
  14. Love and Monsters is really fantastic. I rewatched it late last year and agree that it's a brilliant piece of commentary on the positive aspects of fandom, before such things entered the mainstream cultural conversation. I'd love to see a "sequel" written by RTD but maybe addressing some of the more horrendous fandom issues. It's a testament to RTD's skill that even with the atrocious production issues (like the Absorbaloff costume and performance) he can still write like nobody else. The thing that excites me most about his coming back is that he now has an extra 20 or so years of experience as a producer, plus a non-BBC production company's involvement, so production disasters will hopefully be a thing of the past. I'll also come in and bat for Capaldi/Moffat. Easily my favourite era of NuWho upon a rewatch. I was in the underwhelmed camp when it first aired, but after a few rewatches I'd say Who doesn't get much better than that. The Doctor/Clara dynamic stands as one of the finest I've seen on television, and the writing in series 8 - 10 reaches some exquisite highs. Missy is an exceptional addition to the show. If the show had been cancelled after series 10 it would have been a perfect capstone to the whole of the revival. I'll happily die on this hill!
  15. Can’t wait to see him in the role!
  16. There’s no real way of for us to know how much work would be involved, especially for what us fans expect to be a complete archival release (and most of us wouldn’t want anything less than that). With that in mind, studios are not exactly known for their fastidious archival skills, and Matessino can only use what they give him. I’m still a little bit sour at the fact that Warner Bros didn’t have every session of PoA to give him (or were otherwise unwilling to hand them over); from what I understand there’s a multitude of original versions of cues that were most likely recorded but that weren’t given to Matessino for the Potter release. I hope that wouldn’t be the case for the prequels, but as the first two were analogue recordings who knows where those sessions ended up. On top of all that is the comparatively haphazard sequel scores which have countless alternates from vastly different edits of the film. A complete release of those three alone is probably a mammoth task.
  17. Depends on the context. If we’re talking about how effective or subjectively “good” the music is, you’re right that the artist’s intent doesn’t really matter. But wild speculation about the process of art just feeds into the misinformation machine and distorts history. It might sound cool to imagine JW writing in a certain way but not if it obscures his actual process. To me it makes more sense to accept the simple fact that JW doesn’t use themes in a strict and empirical way, rather than to imagine he’s playing a complicated game of 5-dimensional chess to explain away thematic inconsistencies and “preserve” his genius. The latter is disconcerting to me, and as I mentioned earlier, resembles a conspiracy theory mindset.
  18. I will again say that I don’t think Williams writes scores like that. He does not watch these films thinking about what is going to happen, he writes for what is happening in the moment. He did not hide anything in Rey’s theme. He simply used a melodic and harmonic vocabulary that is consistent with all of his Star Wars scores. Any resemblance to other leitmotifs is purely a result of that vocabulary, nothing more.
  19. I think the most simple reading is that at this point in the film Ron and Hermione have become Harry's family, like Hogwarts has become his home. It's just a little precursor to Leaving Hogwarts which makes both of those things more explicit. But even more likely is that JW has always played fast and loose with his themes, he probably just thought it sounded good. If you start looking into his every choice like Mattris does you'll end up down a conspiracy rabbit hole. I very much doubt John Williams was thinking about which of these 11-year old characters were going to hook up when he wrote the score.
  20. I'm really excited for SNW. Easily the strongest parts of Discovery were the episodes focused on Pike and his crew. The news that it's mostly episodic bodes very well - it's crazy how much my preference for that format has increased over the years. I've been watching the odd Voyager lately (which was my entry into Trek) and I've really loved the tight storytelling, and how easy it is to dip in and out of the episodes and not feel anxious I've missed anything important. Speaking of VOY, it's aged pretty well IMO (save for the frequently stilted Kes/Paris/Kim scenes). I know it has its detractors but Mulgrew gives 100% in every scene she's in, as do most of the rest of the cast. I reeeeally hope she turns up in person one of these days - a spin-off with Seven, Raffi and Janeway would be really fantastic. I know her relationship with Jeri Ryan was strained but I'd like to think they patched things up. If Beltran can come back to voice Chakotay after burning his bridges then anything's possible. One amusing thing I've noticed is just how damn close everyone used to have to stand near each other in the 4:3 aspect ratio days. The actors are practically on top of each other to stay in the frame together, it's quite funny.
  21. I'd say the first half of the first season is the weakest. Super hyperactive and loud (like Rick and Morty). Later on things slow down a little and they actually start to focus on interesting Trek plots, but it's still a cartoon so it's always going to be a bit boisterous. Some of the characters can be abrasive, but that's part of the charm for me. Maybe try a random later episode and see if you like it (it's mostly episodic), but yeah, it might not be for you.
  22. He could still die this season, any appearances in the future could be from his earlier timeline. But yeah, you’re right it’s probably unlikely.
  23. I just finished season 2 of Lower Decks. It’s really great, once it figured the tone out and decoupled itself from Rick and Morty. And holy moly, the score is amazing!
  24. We’re at the fireworks factory finally! That was good fun, but I totally agree with all of your points about Picard’s flashbacks @Andy. Calling it now, the cryptic message from Queen Jurati means that If that’s how it goes down I won’t be disappointed. It’s been a fun season.
  25. This passage from 2:24 to the end of "A Walk in the Woods and Bird's Flight". There's just so much emotion and imagery in this 20 second snippet; a plaintive oboe echoed in longing with the clarinet, chilly tremolo strings evoking the falling snow, and a vaguely ominous pedaled note in the bass signalling the danger always lurking around the corner in this world. It's an exquisite moment in a score absolutely brimming with them.
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