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Docteur Qui

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  1. Like
    Docteur Qui reacted to Tallguy in Good funny music?   
    @Docteur Qui Those are all fantastic points.
     
    Airplane is a perfect example! It's like the story about how Leslie Nielsen and Robert Stack "got it" and played their roles straight, no questions asked. But Lloyd Bridges kept trying to add "jokes" because he didn't think he was being very funny. He didn't get it.
     
    1941 is John Williams being Leslie Nielsen!
  2. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from Holko in GAME OF THRONES   
    It’s not so much that it doesn’t make sense, it’s just that the show failed to properly set up Bran of all people being nominated the king. As the Stark heir he’s not exactly politically neutral (even if he claims to be) and the council selects him based on the advice of Tyrion, who in the eyes of most of Westeros is a kinslayer who murdered his father (and allegedly his nephew), a traitor, and the trusted adviser of the person who literally just nuked Kings Landing. Bran may be the three-eyed raven, but omnipotent knowledge is arguably as dangerous as a dragon depending on what it’s being used for. There isn’t enough connective tissue to make the choice work which is why it’s such a big gripe for me.
     
     
  3. Confused
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from bruce marshall in GAME OF THRONES   
    It’s not so much that it doesn’t make sense, it’s just that the show failed to properly set up Bran of all people being nominated the king. As the Stark heir he’s not exactly politically neutral (even if he claims to be) and the council selects him based on the advice of Tyrion, who in the eyes of most of Westeros is a kinslayer who murdered his father (and allegedly his nephew), a traitor, and the trusted adviser of the person who literally just nuked Kings Landing. Bran may be the three-eyed raven, but omnipotent knowledge is arguably as dangerous as a dragon depending on what it’s being used for. There isn’t enough connective tissue to make the choice work which is why it’s such a big gripe for me.
     
     
  4. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from Yavar Moradi in GAME OF THRONES   
    It’s not so much that it doesn’t make sense, it’s just that the show failed to properly set up Bran of all people being nominated the king. As the Stark heir he’s not exactly politically neutral (even if he claims to be) and the council selects him based on the advice of Tyrion, who in the eyes of most of Westeros is a kinslayer who murdered his father (and allegedly his nephew), a traitor, and the trusted adviser of the person who literally just nuked Kings Landing. Bran may be the three-eyed raven, but omnipotent knowledge is arguably as dangerous as a dragon depending on what it’s being used for. There isn’t enough connective tissue to make the choice work which is why it’s such a big gripe for me.
     
     
  5. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from Marian Schedenig in GAME OF THRONES   
    It’s not so much that it doesn’t make sense, it’s just that the show failed to properly set up Bran of all people being nominated the king. As the Stark heir he’s not exactly politically neutral (even if he claims to be) and the council selects him based on the advice of Tyrion, who in the eyes of most of Westeros is a kinslayer who murdered his father (and allegedly his nephew), a traitor, and the trusted adviser of the person who literally just nuked Kings Landing. Bran may be the three-eyed raven, but omnipotent knowledge is arguably as dangerous as a dragon depending on what it’s being used for. There isn’t enough connective tissue to make the choice work which is why it’s such a big gripe for me.
     
     
  6. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from Tallguy in Good funny music?   
    I love this topic. I've composed music for a lot of comedy in my career, and I've always been fascinated with how music and comedy interact in the visual medium. I've largely adhered to the "contrast" rule, which @Bespin has alluded to. I can't remember which composer or director distilled the argument (it may have been Mel Brooks, referring to Young Frankenstein), but the idea is that for the comedy to work then the music must be completely sincere, and dare I say "serious". The contrast is what makes the emotional authenticity work - if the music is too "silly" it can undermine everything. That's just one viewpoint however and is certainly a matter of taste, as comedy largely is. It's also probably a view that is mostly relevant to the genre of parody; animated slapstick for instance goes by very different rules, but as a genre it's not particularly a favourite of mine (music or comedy-wise).
     
    I love when composers walk the fine line between the serious and the absurd. I think this is displayed perfectly in Elmer Bernstein's Airplane!, a score that is over the top in every sense, but in a way that elevates the material. It's executed with incredible finesse - much of the comedy is deadpan but also very absurd, and the music reflects that with a dramatic sincerity that only ever becomes "silly" in one single moment. In the final scene as the protagonists kiss on the runway the love theme kicks in, building in intensity and shifting key while accompanied by "oohing" choir, eventually reaching a climax as the singers literally shriek and collapse as they hit the highest notes. It's a sublime moment of comedy, and a perfect capstone to a wonderful score:
     
     
    And then there's this scene which takes a slightly different approach, more akin to the mickey mousing referenced earlier in this thread with each blow met with a brassy sting. But even with all the hit points, the militaristic and driven nature of the music makes it all work:
     
    I could go on for days about this topic. 
  7. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from Bespin in Good funny music?   
    I love this topic. I've composed music for a lot of comedy in my career, and I've always been fascinated with how music and comedy interact in the visual medium. I've largely adhered to the "contrast" rule, which @Bespin has alluded to. I can't remember which composer or director distilled the argument (it may have been Mel Brooks, referring to Young Frankenstein), but the idea is that for the comedy to work then the music must be completely sincere, and dare I say "serious". The contrast is what makes the emotional authenticity work - if the music is too "silly" it can undermine everything. That's just one viewpoint however and is certainly a matter of taste, as comedy largely is. It's also probably a view that is mostly relevant to the genre of parody; animated slapstick for instance goes by very different rules, but as a genre it's not particularly a favourite of mine (music or comedy-wise).
     
    I love when composers walk the fine line between the serious and the absurd. I think this is displayed perfectly in Elmer Bernstein's Airplane!, a score that is over the top in every sense, but in a way that elevates the material. It's executed with incredible finesse - much of the comedy is deadpan but also very absurd, and the music reflects that with a dramatic sincerity that only ever becomes "silly" in one single moment. In the final scene as the protagonists kiss on the runway the love theme kicks in, building in intensity and shifting key while accompanied by "oohing" choir, eventually reaching a climax as the singers literally shriek and collapse as they hit the highest notes. It's a sublime moment of comedy, and a perfect capstone to a wonderful score:
     
     
    And then there's this scene which takes a slightly different approach, more akin to the mickey mousing referenced earlier in this thread with each blow met with a brassy sting. But even with all the hit points, the militaristic and driven nature of the music makes it all work:
     
    I could go on for days about this topic. 
  8. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from oierem in GAME OF THRONES   
    I partly agree with you there. Things like Euron Greyjoy (an absolute disaster of a character, show-wise) ambushing the fleet and killing a dragon in minutes were absolutely unforgivable. Bran’s entire arc in the final season was terribly handled; stilted by the writers wanting to wait until the last minute to justify his ascendancy to the throne.
     
    That said, much of the final two episodes (especially the penultimate) is really quite good when viewed as a single finale split into climax and denouement. The burning of King’s Landing is shocking and brutal. Cersei dying in absolute terror as the Red Keep collapses on top of her is arguably more poignant than being assassinated by Arya, even if it feels narratively unsatisfying (again, that’s partly the point of it). Jaime dying alongside her is a tragic end for a complicated character. The haunting imagery of the ruined city, covered in equal parts ashes and snow, is beautiful. As I’ve said before, there’s still plenty to enjoy IMO. I understand people’s disappointment (putting it mildly), but it’s a shame that what does work is completely overshadowed by what doesn’t.
  9. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from oierem in GAME OF THRONES   
    I've never really agreed with things like Jon killing the Night King and claiming the Iron Throne or Arya getting revenge on Cersei. Part of the point (and appeal) of this series was the subversion of fantasy tropes like the unlikely king, and considering how telegraphed all of those things have been from day 1 it's very much in the spirit of this world for those things to not happen. 
     
    For what it's worth I really, really liked that Dany descended into becoming the "villain" of the show. I don't think it was rushed at all; she constantly struggles with violent and egotistical urges but is kept in check by her close allies. When they're all killed and she is rejected by Jon it's not so much "woman go crazy", but more that in her head there's no reason for her to fight the narcissism that has plagued her whole existence. 
  10. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from Loert in Good funny music?   
    I love this topic. I've composed music for a lot of comedy in my career, and I've always been fascinated with how music and comedy interact in the visual medium. I've largely adhered to the "contrast" rule, which @Bespin has alluded to. I can't remember which composer or director distilled the argument (it may have been Mel Brooks, referring to Young Frankenstein), but the idea is that for the comedy to work then the music must be completely sincere, and dare I say "serious". The contrast is what makes the emotional authenticity work - if the music is too "silly" it can undermine everything. That's just one viewpoint however and is certainly a matter of taste, as comedy largely is. It's also probably a view that is mostly relevant to the genre of parody; animated slapstick for instance goes by very different rules, but as a genre it's not particularly a favourite of mine (music or comedy-wise).
     
    I love when composers walk the fine line between the serious and the absurd. I think this is displayed perfectly in Elmer Bernstein's Airplane!, a score that is over the top in every sense, but in a way that elevates the material. It's executed with incredible finesse - much of the comedy is deadpan but also very absurd, and the music reflects that with a dramatic sincerity that only ever becomes "silly" in one single moment. In the final scene as the protagonists kiss on the runway the love theme kicks in, building in intensity and shifting key while accompanied by "oohing" choir, eventually reaching a climax as the singers literally shriek and collapse as they hit the highest notes. It's a sublime moment of comedy, and a perfect capstone to a wonderful score:
     
     
    And then there's this scene which takes a slightly different approach, more akin to the mickey mousing referenced earlier in this thread with each blow met with a brassy sting. But even with all the hit points, the militaristic and driven nature of the music makes it all work:
     
    I could go on for days about this topic. 
  11. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from JNHFan2000 in GAME OF THRONES   
    It’s not so much that it doesn’t make sense, it’s just that the show failed to properly set up Bran of all people being nominated the king. As the Stark heir he’s not exactly politically neutral (even if he claims to be) and the council selects him based on the advice of Tyrion, who in the eyes of most of Westeros is a kinslayer who murdered his father (and allegedly his nephew), a traitor, and the trusted adviser of the person who literally just nuked Kings Landing. Bran may be the three-eyed raven, but omnipotent knowledge is arguably as dangerous as a dragon depending on what it’s being used for. There isn’t enough connective tissue to make the choice work which is why it’s such a big gripe for me.
     
     
  12. Neutral
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from BB-8 in Would You Want a Filmmaker to reuse John Williams cues the way Tarantino uses Morricone?   
    I would argue that the plethora of concert suites Williams has written for his themes would work perfectly for such use. They were composed as standalone orchestral music without any sync points in mind; it'd be no different than quoting sections or movements of a Beethoven symphony or Strauss tone poem. 
  13. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from AC1 in Good funny music?   
    I love this topic. I've composed music for a lot of comedy in my career, and I've always been fascinated with how music and comedy interact in the visual medium. I've largely adhered to the "contrast" rule, which @Bespin has alluded to. I can't remember which composer or director distilled the argument (it may have been Mel Brooks, referring to Young Frankenstein), but the idea is that for the comedy to work then the music must be completely sincere, and dare I say "serious". The contrast is what makes the emotional authenticity work - if the music is too "silly" it can undermine everything. That's just one viewpoint however and is certainly a matter of taste, as comedy largely is. It's also probably a view that is mostly relevant to the genre of parody; animated slapstick for instance goes by very different rules, but as a genre it's not particularly a favourite of mine (music or comedy-wise).
     
    I love when composers walk the fine line between the serious and the absurd. I think this is displayed perfectly in Elmer Bernstein's Airplane!, a score that is over the top in every sense, but in a way that elevates the material. It's executed with incredible finesse - much of the comedy is deadpan but also very absurd, and the music reflects that with a dramatic sincerity that only ever becomes "silly" in one single moment. In the final scene as the protagonists kiss on the runway the love theme kicks in, building in intensity and shifting key while accompanied by "oohing" choir, eventually reaching a climax as the singers literally shriek and collapse as they hit the highest notes. It's a sublime moment of comedy, and a perfect capstone to a wonderful score:
     
     
    And then there's this scene which takes a slightly different approach, more akin to the mickey mousing referenced earlier in this thread with each blow met with a brassy sting. But even with all the hit points, the militaristic and driven nature of the music makes it all work:
     
    I could go on for days about this topic. 
  14. Like
    Docteur Qui reacted to bruckhorn in Omni Music Publishing Updates   
    E-mail sent out from Omni:
     
    Great news Omni customers,

    If you live outside the US, Schott Music is now offering Tangled and How To Train Your Dragon from their website.

    Please click on the links below to order. You will find that the shipping costs are considerably cheaper ordering from them. Keep an eye out for How To Train Your Dragon 2 in the next couple of weeks.    Omni is hard at work on some new books: A Streetcar Named Desire, Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan, and Dracula (’92). Omni will re-release Total Recall v2.0 over the summer.

    Check out Tangled and How To Train Your Dragon on the Schott Music website.   --- END QUOTED MATERIAL ---   Some good news for our European friends.
     
    Alex North fans getting a little love.
     
    I wonder what the reasons are for v2.0 of Total Recall...
     
    And all together now: KHAN!
  15. Like
    Docteur Qui reacted to Tallguy in Movies you should see but probably haven’t   
    A movie I haven't seen in a while but never fails to delight me.
     
    The Dish (2000). Funny, heartwarming, and based on a little bit of true story.
     

  16. Like
    Docteur Qui reacted to Bespin in Good funny music?   
    Is it the music that is funny, the special effect sound, or the juxtaposition of the two?
     
    (DON'T QUOTE ME FOR GOD'S SAKE!)
  17. Like
    Docteur Qui reacted to Bespin in Good funny music?   
    I think there's no such thing as "funny" music.
     
    Music can bring a lot of emotion like joy, sadness, calm, heroism, passion, anxiety, etc.
     
    But if you find a music "funny", it's because of its use in a specific context.
     
    By example a dark music used in a certain context can be "fun", and almost every type of music deliberately designed to be "out of place" in a situation can be funny too.
  18. Like
    Docteur Qui reacted to Tallguy in Good funny music?   
    I'm pretty sure I don't like "funny" scores. I make this blanket statement and I'm making sure I can back it up.
     
    When does the music try to be funny? The slide whistle in The Man with the Golden Gun? Jar Jar music? Ewok music? (I feel like Williams gets more "whimsical" than funny.) "Follow Me" from Always? "Indy's Very First Adventure"? Oh! Is March of the Villains funny?
     
    I'm writing this because someone was talking about the score for Maverick (the western one) and mentioned that Richard Donner wanted Randy Newman's music to be funnier. I love the score. And the movie is funny. But it's not a funny score. In other movies Newman rides up on that "goofy whimsy" line rather a lot, I suppose.
     
    One of the funniest movies ever made is Young Frankenstein. I love the score. The score is not funny.
     
    Hmmmm. Clue. I like Clue. The score for Clue is arguably... Funny. Hmmm. This might be a chink in my armor.
     
    Ghostbusters? Wow. Where do I put Ghostbusters? The main theme is "Down on their luck sad sacks". Very cute. Funny? I mean it gets used in lots of not-funny ways. (Even more so in Afterlife.) But is it basically funny?
     
    Goldeneye! Ladies First isn't just funny. But it's definitely in that area. I've said lots of times that more people would at least not hate that score if it were not for that track. I've learned not to skip it because it develops into something cooler than the initial boopsie bipsie chirps and record scratches.
     
    And finally the obligatory Star Trek soundtracks.
     
    The Original Series had a non trivial amount of funny music. Mulendore wrote "Play-Off" for the "whoops, did I do that?" moments. Fried wrote Coochy Coo. They're short. Not my go-to Star Trek tracks.
     
    Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home gets a lot of hate. I think almost entirely for two tracks: Chekov's Run and Hospital Chase. Of the two of them the "funny" one is Hospital Chase. Hmmm. I don't hate it. But it never finds its way onto any Star Trek playlists that I make. (Or mix tapes, back in the day.) But most of the score doesn't even flirt with funny.
     
    In Star Trek V: The Final Frontier there's a moment where Kirk almost winks at the camera and says "I miss my old chair." The music does the same. It diminishes an otherwise very heroic cue.
     
    What does everyone else think of funny music?
     
    (I love funny songs!)
     
     
     
     
     
     
  19. Like
    Docteur Qui reacted to bruce marshall in GAME OF THRONES   
    understatement of the millennium
     
    Ive said this before, but I think the destruction Kings Landing was inspired by the firebombing of Dresden.
    In Feb. 1945, with victory over Germany inevitable, the RAF completely destroyed one of the most beautiful cities in Europe.
    It had no strategic value.
    it was not ' logical'.
    One hundred plus thousand civilians died a horrible death
    A " civilized" country resorted to the barbarism of its enemy.
     
    I also think Danys decision to " break the chains" of the world was inspired by the US.
    america entered  World War II to liberate Europe from tyranny.
    But, once that noble goal was accomplished did they go home? No, they stayed.
    Now, we were going to " defeat" Communism around the world.
    What followed were decades of unprovoked wars, slaughter, and the toppling of Democratic regimes.
     
    think about the parallel (or, don't.)
     
  20. Like
    Docteur Qui reacted to Mr. Gitz in Did anyone else ever hide the fact you listened to film scores or were embarrassed to admit it to friends?   
    I went to high school during the early 2000s just as MP3 players & IPODS became standard devices kids brought to school. Often times kids would share ears buds while studying or what have you. But not me. I was so over protective of my IPod lest anyone find out the kind of music I truly loved. John Williams, Howard Shore, Danny Elfman, Ennio Morricone, Thomas Newman, Michael Kamen(my first soundtrack CD I ever bought was X-Men!). It sounds ridiculous to admit now. But I was truly embarrassed about loving film music and being a film geek. I didn’t fit in with that particular cohort or stereotype. I was athletic, fairly popularish and hid my true self from “friends”. I still remember my “coming out” as a film score and film buff during a trivia contest I won. I didn’t just win, I dominated. My pride got the better of my embarrassment. Friends knew I loved going to the movies but they didn’t know I was a true “nerd”. I still remember hurriedly hiding my Star Wars memorabilia in my room before my new girlfriend came over. Or making excuses when a friend would see what was on my IPod. “Oh my sister loves classical music and borrows my IPod”. I cringe when I think of how embarrassed I was. 
     
    Was I alone in doing this? Did anyone else hide the fact that they didn’t just listen to “regular” music? 
  21. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from Yavar Moradi in GAME OF THRONES   
    I partly agree with you there. Things like Euron Greyjoy (an absolute disaster of a character, show-wise) ambushing the fleet and killing a dragon in minutes were absolutely unforgivable. Bran’s entire arc in the final season was terribly handled; stilted by the writers wanting to wait until the last minute to justify his ascendancy to the throne.
     
    That said, much of the final two episodes (especially the penultimate) is really quite good when viewed as a single finale split into climax and denouement. The burning of King’s Landing is shocking and brutal. Cersei dying in absolute terror as the Red Keep collapses on top of her is arguably more poignant than being assassinated by Arya, even if it feels narratively unsatisfying (again, that’s partly the point of it). Jaime dying alongside her is a tragic end for a complicated character. The haunting imagery of the ruined city, covered in equal parts ashes and snow, is beautiful. As I’ve said before, there’s still plenty to enjoy IMO. I understand people’s disappointment (putting it mildly), but it’s a shame that what does work is completely overshadowed by what doesn’t.
  22. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from bruce marshall in GAME OF THRONES   
    I partly agree with you there. Things like Euron Greyjoy (an absolute disaster of a character, show-wise) ambushing the fleet and killing a dragon in minutes were absolutely unforgivable. Bran’s entire arc in the final season was terribly handled; stilted by the writers wanting to wait until the last minute to justify his ascendancy to the throne.
     
    That said, much of the final two episodes (especially the penultimate) is really quite good when viewed as a single finale split into climax and denouement. The burning of King’s Landing is shocking and brutal. Cersei dying in absolute terror as the Red Keep collapses on top of her is arguably more poignant than being assassinated by Arya, even if it feels narratively unsatisfying (again, that’s partly the point of it). Jaime dying alongside her is a tragic end for a complicated character. The haunting imagery of the ruined city, covered in equal parts ashes and snow, is beautiful. As I’ve said before, there’s still plenty to enjoy IMO. I understand people’s disappointment (putting it mildly), but it’s a shame that what does work is completely overshadowed by what doesn’t.
  23. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from ConorPower in Would You Want a Filmmaker to reuse John Williams cues the way Tarantino uses Morricone?   
    Whoa, I don't watch Euphoria and didn't realise it used the Fury theme! What a great use of it. 
     
    I would love it if more filmmakers used Williams' music like this. I wouldn't be surprised if it happened more in decades to come, particularly more obscure stuff like the above example. I can't imagine the really iconic music working very well though; the existing associations to things like Star Wars or Indiana Jones are probably too strong for a reimagining to work in the same way, at least not without delving into parody territory. Could be a great way for some budding music editors to expose audiences to some of JW's hidden gems.
  24. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from Marian Schedenig in GAME OF THRONES   
    I've never really agreed with things like Jon killing the Night King and claiming the Iron Throne or Arya getting revenge on Cersei. Part of the point (and appeal) of this series was the subversion of fantasy tropes like the unlikely king, and considering how telegraphed all of those things have been from day 1 it's very much in the spirit of this world for those things to not happen. 
     
    For what it's worth I really, really liked that Dany descended into becoming the "villain" of the show. I don't think it was rushed at all; she constantly struggles with violent and egotistical urges but is kept in check by her close allies. When they're all killed and she is rejected by Jon it's not so much "woman go crazy", but more that in her head there's no reason for her to fight the narcissism that has plagued her whole existence. 
  25. Like
    Docteur Qui got a reaction from bruce marshall in GAME OF THRONES   
    I've never really agreed with things like Jon killing the Night King and claiming the Iron Throne or Arya getting revenge on Cersei. Part of the point (and appeal) of this series was the subversion of fantasy tropes like the unlikely king, and considering how telegraphed all of those things have been from day 1 it's very much in the spirit of this world for those things to not happen. 
     
    For what it's worth I really, really liked that Dany descended into becoming the "villain" of the show. I don't think it was rushed at all; she constantly struggles with violent and egotistical urges but is kept in check by her close allies. When they're all killed and she is rejected by Jon it's not so much "woman go crazy", but more that in her head there's no reason for her to fight the narcissism that has plagued her whole existence. 
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