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TownerFan

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  1. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from KK in John Williams scoring all three new Star Wars films!!   
    I don't think we should read too much between the lines on this. As I see it, it's plain and simple, just like it seems: they're waiting for JW to say "yes". And they're confident he will.
    I'm sure you all know how much working relationships are a main thing in Hollywood. Giacchino and Abrams share an exclusive relationship based on mutual respect and admiration and they appears also to be good friends (i.e. it's not just work). They both reached high level of power and success working together, so it's pretty natural for both to speak high of each other in public. They both know how much one owes to the other (in the best sense).
    Now, since Abrams has to work on a franchise with a more than estabilished musical identity (i.e.: it's one of the major things that makes Star Wars what it really is) and the fact its composer is still alive and kicking, I see quite natural they want to give him first option. Well, they MUST give him first option, as I see it. John Williams is Star Wars, as much as Lucas, Ford, Hamill, Fisher, Burtt and all the others who created it are. As I said before, nobody in the world would take the job out of his hands just because the chosen director has an ongoing working relationship with another composer. Also, as much as Abrams is fond of Giacchino and his music, I think he would be more than happy if JW ends up writing music for a film he's directing. For any director, it's like winning the lottery!
  2. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from karelm in John Williams scoring all three new Star Wars films!!   
    I don't think we should read too much between the lines on this. As I see it, it's plain and simple, just like it seems: they're waiting for JW to say "yes". And they're confident he will.
    I'm sure you all know how much working relationships are a main thing in Hollywood. Giacchino and Abrams share an exclusive relationship based on mutual respect and admiration and they appears also to be good friends (i.e. it's not just work). They both reached high level of power and success working together, so it's pretty natural for both to speak high of each other in public. They both know how much one owes to the other (in the best sense).
    Now, since Abrams has to work on a franchise with a more than estabilished musical identity (i.e.: it's one of the major things that makes Star Wars what it really is) and the fact its composer is still alive and kicking, I see quite natural they want to give him first option. Well, they MUST give him first option, as I see it. John Williams is Star Wars, as much as Lucas, Ford, Hamill, Fisher, Burtt and all the others who created it are. As I said before, nobody in the world would take the job out of his hands just because the chosen director has an ongoing working relationship with another composer. Also, as much as Abrams is fond of Giacchino and his music, I think he would be more than happy if JW ends up writing music for a film he's directing. For any director, it's like winning the lottery!
  3. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from Incanus in John Williams scoring all three new Star Wars films!!   
    Courtesy of Jon and Al Kaplan:


  4. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from Incanus in John Williams scoring all three new Star Wars films!!   
    This. It all depends on JW's will and nothing else. I'm pretty sure Lucas, Kennedy and Abrams are giving him first option, so to speak. Nobody in the world would take the assignment out of his hands without being sure he doesn't want to do it. If JW wanna do it, he'll do it. It's just that simple.
  5. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from Ricard in John Williams scoring all three new Star Wars films!!   
    I made a laugh and that's it. I don't think it asks for more than that.
  6. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from Ricard in John Williams scoring all three new Star Wars films!!   
    It was something made only for letting people have a laugh. Film score fans take things too much seriously.
  7. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from Ricard in John Williams scoring all three new Star Wars films!!   
    Courtesy of Jon and Al Kaplan:


  8. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from theBT in Steven Spielberg's Obama   
    Is that JW music in the background?
  9. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from publicist in FSM's Lukas Kendall speaks out   
    Check out the first part of this exclusive interview with Lukas Kendall of Film Score Monthly--a look back at his long career as a soundtrack CDs producer. It's Lukas unleashed
    http://www.colonnesonore.net/contenuti-speciali/interviste/2517-qits-all-in-the-film-musicq-interview-with-lukas-kendall-film-score-monthly-part-1.html
    Part 2 will be up in the next few days. Hope you'll enjoy!
  10. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from Incanus in FSM's Lukas Kendall speaks out   
    Check out the first part of this exclusive interview with Lukas Kendall of Film Score Monthly--a look back at his long career as a soundtrack CDs producer. It's Lukas unleashed
    http://www.colonnesonore.net/contenuti-speciali/interviste/2517-qits-all-in-the-film-musicq-interview-with-lukas-kendall-film-score-monthly-part-1.html
    Part 2 will be up in the next few days. Hope you'll enjoy!
  11. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from crocodile in FSM's Lukas Kendall speaks out   
    Check out the first part of this exclusive interview with Lukas Kendall of Film Score Monthly--a look back at his long career as a soundtrack CDs producer. It's Lukas unleashed
    http://www.colonnesonore.net/contenuti-speciali/interviste/2517-qits-all-in-the-film-musicq-interview-with-lukas-kendall-film-score-monthly-part-1.html
    Part 2 will be up in the next few days. Hope you'll enjoy!
  12. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from oierem in "The Call" motif from E.T.   
    I always thought of "Over the Moon" as a theme for Elliott. But again Williams uses it with much flexibility, without linking it too much to a single idea.
    To me, that motif is a perfect example of a technique Williams explained several times (i.e. introducing the main theme one bit at a time): the motif is constructed on similar intervals of the "Flying" theme and we tend to familiarize with that particular construction since the beginning of the movie, so when the Flying theme finally appears in full form, we're kind of already "prepared" for it and every piece fall into one single place.
  13. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from Incanus in "The Call" motif from E.T.   
    Williams in many cases uses themes/motifs in a deliberate way, without linking them too much to a single character and/or idea, but playing with them on a broader emotional function (i.e. the theme works in an emotional way hence I'll use it even though it's apparently out of place--the most famous example is the use of Leia's theme when Ben Kenobi gets killed).
    In this specific case you mention, I think the "call" motif represents a broader, more general idea within the score. While we have specific themes for E.T., Elliot and for their relationship, this motif (which however is built on similar intervals of E.T.'s theme, i.e. a perfect fifth at the beginning, followed by a descending group) seems to represent a general idea of E.T.'s loneliness on Earth and the subsequent strive to "call home" to get back there. Of course Williams doesn't use only with that purpose, because of what I stated before--his consummate musicianship makes him pretty flexible with his own thematic creations.
  14. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from Brónach in Django Unchained   
    I'm resorting this up because I think all this useless and stupid controversy needs clarifications. I already wrote this on the FSM board, but I guess repetita juvant:

    First of all, let's get down to facts: the day after this stupid controversy exploded (keep in mind it was created and agitated by incorrect Italian news agency reports and then reprised by international agencies), Morricone released an official press statement to correct and clarify what he said. Here's a translation:



    I think this clarifies everything. The fact he isn't comfortable with a movie showing so much blood and carnage maybe sounds ridiculous to some fellows here considering he scored A LOT of violent and disturbing films over his long career. But we should take into account that he's now 85 years-old and probably his taste in movies has changed.

    Also, everyone who knows and follows Morricone since a long time knows very well that the core matter about consistency and coherence of film composition has ALWAYS been one of his strongest aesthetic flags, which he sometimes defended to the point of sounding a bit rude. He always believed in film music as something that needs artistic integrity and he spoke against the usage of "preexisting tracks-as-film-score" many times, especially when this approach is in conflict with an original score. He had strong discussions with Terrence Malick during DAYS OF HEAVEN and he had the guts to tell him: "Terry, you HAVE TO choose!" (this is a story he told during a public conference I attended). But he always acknowledged the FREEDOM of the director to choose whatever approach is right for the movie (in fact, he spoke highly several times about Kubrick's use of music in his movies and it looks like he's fine with Tarantino's as well). But he pertains to a generation/category of film composers (like Williams and Goldsmith) who STRONGLY believe in the creation of original music suited and tailored to the film's needs, with the utmost respect of the film itself. As he many times stated, the primary task of the film composer is TO SERVE the film. In this sense, I find perfectly understandable he maybe doesn't see eye-to-eye with some of Tarantino's musical choices. Nevertheless, he respects and admires him.

    What I found quite insulting in all this useless controversy is the fact that most of the people who commented it around the internet quickly divided into fanboy factions (be it Tarantino's camp or Morricone's camp), following this nowadays common internet behavior of taking a stance over every single matter to the point of catfighting over it. And this happened also with film music lovers, who should probably be more aware than others that what Morricone said is something that's part of the job of the film composer (i.e. discussing and even dissenting with the director, finding the right approach for the movie, etc.). Instead, many score nerds popped up and started to lambast Morricone, depicting him as an old fart who is out of touch with contemporary film aesthetics.

    Yesterday I did a piece about this for the website I write for. It's written in Italian, but maybe with an automated translator you'll get what is my feeling over all this:

    http://bit.ly/114TAii

  15. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from Marian Schedenig in Django Unchained   
    I'm resorting this up because I think all this useless and stupid controversy needs clarifications. I already wrote this on the FSM board, but I guess repetita juvant:

    First of all, let's get down to facts: the day after this stupid controversy exploded (keep in mind it was created and agitated by incorrect Italian news agency reports and then reprised by international agencies), Morricone released an official press statement to correct and clarify what he said. Here's a translation:



    I think this clarifies everything. The fact he isn't comfortable with a movie showing so much blood and carnage maybe sounds ridiculous to some fellows here considering he scored A LOT of violent and disturbing films over his long career. But we should take into account that he's now 85 years-old and probably his taste in movies has changed.

    Also, everyone who knows and follows Morricone since a long time knows very well that the core matter about consistency and coherence of film composition has ALWAYS been one of his strongest aesthetic flags, which he sometimes defended to the point of sounding a bit rude. He always believed in film music as something that needs artistic integrity and he spoke against the usage of "preexisting tracks-as-film-score" many times, especially when this approach is in conflict with an original score. He had strong discussions with Terrence Malick during DAYS OF HEAVEN and he had the guts to tell him: "Terry, you HAVE TO choose!" (this is a story he told during a public conference I attended). But he always acknowledged the FREEDOM of the director to choose whatever approach is right for the movie (in fact, he spoke highly several times about Kubrick's use of music in his movies and it looks like he's fine with Tarantino's as well). But he pertains to a generation/category of film composers (like Williams and Goldsmith) who STRONGLY believe in the creation of original music suited and tailored to the film's needs, with the utmost respect of the film itself. As he many times stated, the primary task of the film composer is TO SERVE the film. In this sense, I find perfectly understandable he maybe doesn't see eye-to-eye with some of Tarantino's musical choices. Nevertheless, he respects and admires him.

    What I found quite insulting in all this useless controversy is the fact that most of the people who commented it around the internet quickly divided into fanboy factions (be it Tarantino's camp or Morricone's camp), following this nowadays common internet behavior of taking a stance over every single matter to the point of catfighting over it. And this happened also with film music lovers, who should probably be more aware than others that what Morricone said is something that's part of the job of the film composer (i.e. discussing and even dissenting with the director, finding the right approach for the movie, etc.). Instead, many score nerds popped up and started to lambast Morricone, depicting him as an old fart who is out of touch with contemporary film aesthetics.

    Yesterday I did a piece about this for the website I write for. It's written in Italian, but maybe with an automated translator you'll get what is my feeling over all this:

    http://bit.ly/114TAii

  16. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from Once in Django Unchained   
    I'm resorting this up because I think all this useless and stupid controversy needs clarifications. I already wrote this on the FSM board, but I guess repetita juvant:

    First of all, let's get down to facts: the day after this stupid controversy exploded (keep in mind it was created and agitated by incorrect Italian news agency reports and then reprised by international agencies), Morricone released an official press statement to correct and clarify what he said. Here's a translation:



    I think this clarifies everything. The fact he isn't comfortable with a movie showing so much blood and carnage maybe sounds ridiculous to some fellows here considering he scored A LOT of violent and disturbing films over his long career. But we should take into account that he's now 85 years-old and probably his taste in movies has changed.

    Also, everyone who knows and follows Morricone since a long time knows very well that the core matter about consistency and coherence of film composition has ALWAYS been one of his strongest aesthetic flags, which he sometimes defended to the point of sounding a bit rude. He always believed in film music as something that needs artistic integrity and he spoke against the usage of "preexisting tracks-as-film-score" many times, especially when this approach is in conflict with an original score. He had strong discussions with Terrence Malick during DAYS OF HEAVEN and he had the guts to tell him: "Terry, you HAVE TO choose!" (this is a story he told during a public conference I attended). But he always acknowledged the FREEDOM of the director to choose whatever approach is right for the movie (in fact, he spoke highly several times about Kubrick's use of music in his movies and it looks like he's fine with Tarantino's as well). But he pertains to a generation/category of film composers (like Williams and Goldsmith) who STRONGLY believe in the creation of original music suited and tailored to the film's needs, with the utmost respect of the film itself. As he many times stated, the primary task of the film composer is TO SERVE the film. In this sense, I find perfectly understandable he maybe doesn't see eye-to-eye with some of Tarantino's musical choices. Nevertheless, he respects and admires him.

    What I found quite insulting in all this useless controversy is the fact that most of the people who commented it around the internet quickly divided into fanboy factions (be it Tarantino's camp or Morricone's camp), following this nowadays common internet behavior of taking a stance over every single matter to the point of catfighting over it. And this happened also with film music lovers, who should probably be more aware than others that what Morricone said is something that's part of the job of the film composer (i.e. discussing and even dissenting with the director, finding the right approach for the movie, etc.). Instead, many score nerds popped up and started to lambast Morricone, depicting him as an old fart who is out of touch with contemporary film aesthetics.

    Yesterday I did a piece about this for the website I write for. It's written in Italian, but maybe with an automated translator you'll get what is my feeling over all this:

    http://bit.ly/114TAii

  17. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from Muad'Dib in Django Unchained   
    I'm resorting this up because I think all this useless and stupid controversy needs clarifications. I already wrote this on the FSM board, but I guess repetita juvant:

    First of all, let's get down to facts: the day after this stupid controversy exploded (keep in mind it was created and agitated by incorrect Italian news agency reports and then reprised by international agencies), Morricone released an official press statement to correct and clarify what he said. Here's a translation:



    I think this clarifies everything. The fact he isn't comfortable with a movie showing so much blood and carnage maybe sounds ridiculous to some fellows here considering he scored A LOT of violent and disturbing films over his long career. But we should take into account that he's now 85 years-old and probably his taste in movies has changed.

    Also, everyone who knows and follows Morricone since a long time knows very well that the core matter about consistency and coherence of film composition has ALWAYS been one of his strongest aesthetic flags, which he sometimes defended to the point of sounding a bit rude. He always believed in film music as something that needs artistic integrity and he spoke against the usage of "preexisting tracks-as-film-score" many times, especially when this approach is in conflict with an original score. He had strong discussions with Terrence Malick during DAYS OF HEAVEN and he had the guts to tell him: "Terry, you HAVE TO choose!" (this is a story he told during a public conference I attended). But he always acknowledged the FREEDOM of the director to choose whatever approach is right for the movie (in fact, he spoke highly several times about Kubrick's use of music in his movies and it looks like he's fine with Tarantino's as well). But he pertains to a generation/category of film composers (like Williams and Goldsmith) who STRONGLY believe in the creation of original music suited and tailored to the film's needs, with the utmost respect of the film itself. As he many times stated, the primary task of the film composer is TO SERVE the film. In this sense, I find perfectly understandable he maybe doesn't see eye-to-eye with some of Tarantino's musical choices. Nevertheless, he respects and admires him.

    What I found quite insulting in all this useless controversy is the fact that most of the people who commented it around the internet quickly divided into fanboy factions (be it Tarantino's camp or Morricone's camp), following this nowadays common internet behavior of taking a stance over every single matter to the point of catfighting over it. And this happened also with film music lovers, who should probably be more aware than others that what Morricone said is something that's part of the job of the film composer (i.e. discussing and even dissenting with the director, finding the right approach for the movie, etc.). Instead, many score nerds popped up and started to lambast Morricone, depicting him as an old fart who is out of touch with contemporary film aesthetics.

    Yesterday I did a piece about this for the website I write for. It's written in Italian, but maybe with an automated translator you'll get what is my feeling over all this:

    http://bit.ly/114TAii

  18. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from BLUMENKOHL in "They're digging in the wrong place..."   
    In my own very humble opinion, the "problem" lies within the Hollywood industry itself, which always had and still has the tendency of pigeon-holing individual talents.
    There are quite a few great contemporary composers who writes emotional, engaging, direct, creative music... but they simply are not writing for Hollywood movies. I'm talking about people like Eric Whitacre, Mason Bates, Kevin Puts, Peter Boyer, Kevin Kaska and a few others. Then there are highly talented composers like Austin Wintory who found great creative stimulus within the videogame industry. Oh, and don't let me started with the current exciting generation of young European composers who write for independent films over here.
    And you know what's the irony? It's that almost EVERY ONE of these talented fellas recognize publicly composers like Williams, Goldsmith, Barry, Morricone among their major influences.
    In a nutshell: the talent is definitely out there. There are a lot of great composers who are writing and even experimenting highly creative stuff intermingling traditional concert presentation with visual media (check out some of Mason Bates' stuff or Whitacre's virtual choir projects). But all of this is happening outside Hollywood.
    In my opinion, the future of media music has a much broader scope than the one currently proposed by Hollywood studio productions.
  19. Like
    TownerFan reacted to Incanus in John Williams talks LINCOLN on Classical KUSC Radio   
    Great Maurizio! Thanks again for bringing this to our attention.
  20. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from publicist in The official Alexandre Desplat thread   
  21. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from Omen II in My JW Video Tributes   
    As the year ends, I want to share with you fellow JWFans a couple of small video tributes I made to the music of the Maestro. More will come in the near future! I had fun creating these little pieces. Hope you all enjoy!


    Happy New Year everyone! May 2013 be filled with joy, peace and everything you wish for.
  22. Like
    TownerFan reacted to Thor in Merry Christmas!!!   
    Merry Christmas to you, Alice, and also a special greeting to the handful of "hardcore" Williams fans in here that have a particular interest in the old and obscure stuff -- Miguel, indy4, Augie, filmmusic, Konstantinos, thx99, Maurizio and I'm sure I'm forgetting someone. There aren't a lot of places I can satisfy my need for these discussions, so you're all the reason for why I still pop my head in once in a while.
  23. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from Craig Evans in Who Does John Williams' Synths?   
    Yes. In the music featurette on the War of the Worlds DVD Williams actually explains how he tries to write for an electronic instrument:

    (@ 4:55)
  24. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from KK in The single most beautiful piece of music ever written by John Williams   
    Here's the "Most Beautiful John Williams" playlist (so far) according to the JWFans
    "Theme" From Schindler's List
    "Cadillac Of The Skies" from Empire of the Sun
    "The Dinosaurs" from Jurassic Park
    "Blue Fairy" theme from A.I.
    "Remembrances" from Schindler's List
    "The Homecoming" from War Horse
    "Love Theme" from Superman
    "Growing Up" from The River
    "End Credits" from Born on the 4th of July
    "The Visitors/Bye/End Titles: Special Edition" from Close Encounters (special mention to the last 45 sec. by Blumenkohl)
    "You Are the Pan" - Hook
    "Cinque's Theme" - Amistad
    "Across the Stars" - Attack of the Clones
    "Confluence" - Memoirs of a Geisha
    "Princess Leia's Theme" from Star Wars
    "E.T. and Me" from E.T.
    "End Credits" from E.T.
    "Leaving Hogwarts" fro Harry Potter
    "The Reunion" from A.I.
    "As the Water" from Memoirs of a Geisha
    "Adventures on Earth" from E.T.
    "American Collection Theme" from Masterpiece Theatre American Collection
    "Jazz Autographs" from The Terminal
    "Short Round's Theme" from Temple of Doom
    "Dartmoor 1912" from War Horse
    "The Fountain Scene" from The Terminal
    "Dry Your Tears, Africa" from Amistad
    "Buckbeack's Flight" and "A Window to the Past" from Harry Potter
    "The Peterson House and Finale" from Lincoln
    "Love Theme" from The Missouri Breaks
    "Remembering Emile and Finale" from War Horse
    "Dogs, Ponies and Old Ruins" from Images
    "Journey to the Island" from Jurassic Park
    "Song" from Cello Concerto
    "The Ballroom Scene" from The Witches of Eastwick
    "End Titles, End Cast" from Jaws 2
    "Back to America" from Angela's Ashes
    "Nocturne" from Horn Concerto
    "Chairman's Waltz" from Memoirs of a Geisha - Suite for Cello and Orchestra
    "Give me Your Names" from Schindler's List
    "The Early Days" from Born on the 4th of July
    "End Titles" from Dracula
    "Yoda and the Force" from The Empire Strikes Back
    "Luke and leia" from Return of the Jedi
    "Theme" from Angela's Ashes
    "Making the List" from Schindler's List
    "With Malice Toward None (Piano Solo)" from Lincoln
    "Theme" from Sabrina
    "The Miracle of the Ark" from Raiders of the Lost Ark
    "Audience with the Holy Father" from Monsignor
    "The Levitation" from Return of the Jedi
    "Finale and Theme" from JFK
    "The Flight to Neverland" from Hook
    "Hide and Seek" from A.I.
    "A Christmas Quilt" from Stepmom
    "A Change of Season" from Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone
    "Hatching Baby Raptor" from Jurassic Park
    "A Tree For My Bed" from Jurassic Park.
    "Jim's New Life" from Empire of the Sun
    "Song for World Peace" (2008 revised edition)
    "Marion's Theme" (2008 Concert Version)
    "Regaining a Son" from 7 years in tibet
    "A New Beginning" from Minority Report
    "Exit Music" from Hook
    "In Orbit" from Spacecamp
    "Yoda's Theme" from The Empire Strikes Back
    "Han Solo and the Princess" (Concert Version) from TESB
    "Anakin's Theme" from The Phantom Menace
    "Leaving Home" from Superman
    "Fawkes the Phoenix from CoS
    "Reading Lesson" from Stanley and Iris
    "Thoughts of Home" from Munich
    "Santoni's Compassion" from Monsignor
    "The People's House" from Lincoln
    "Harry's Wondrous World" from HPSS
    "For Gillian" from The Fury
    "The First Seance" from Family Plot
    "Goodbyes" from Amazing Stories
    "The Landing" from Amazing Stories
    "Among the Clouds" from Always
    "Listening to Carson" from Home Alone
    "Mom Returns/Finale" from Home Alone
    "Growing Up in Paris" from Sabrina
    "The Returnees" from CE3K
    Quite an impressive list
  25. Like
    TownerFan got a reaction from Jarbas in Has anyone here heard 'Storia Di Una Donna' (1970)?   
    I did extensive research to find a copy or even just information about both film and score throughout the years.
    I know Matessino searched for master tapes of this score without results (at least so far). It appears the score was recorded in Rome, Italy, somewhere in 1968 under the supervision of Stanley Wilson (who was then Universal Pictures music supervisor). Williams was unable to attend the sessions because he was in London to record Goodbye Mr Chips.
    The orchestral backing of the vocal version sung by Ornella Vanoni was however conducted by JW in Los Angeles, but that was probably produced in a different timeframe for the 45rpm single release.
    Another thing most people don't know is that Alan & Marilyn Bergman wrote the original lyrics of the song, which were then translated/adapted in Italian by Antonio Amurri.
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