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Mr. Breathmask

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  1. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Koray Savas in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    I love The Fifth Element, Ruby Rhod included.
  2. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Brónach in .   
    It's actual real movie score. It has themes! Counterpoint! Development! It's very good. 
  3. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from AC1 in America   
    If you want, I can send down some Bossche Bollen from the North. Should be good for throwing from a large distance...
  4. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Once in Walt Disney Records The Legacy Collection   
    Really happy to see they're carrying on with this. 
  5. Like
    Mr. Breathmask reacted to Demondm810 in Walt Disney Records The Legacy Collection   
    Looks like more are coming. 
     
    Robin Hood will be released in July. 

  6. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from bollemanneke in What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)   
    Star Wars: Episode VI - Return of the Jedi
     
    It's just not very good, is it?
  7. Like
    Mr. Breathmask reacted to Nick1066 in STAR WARS general thread   
    JW? Is that you?
  8. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Sir Hilary Bray in Your favorite melody by John Williams   
    Han Solo and the Princess.
  9. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Pieter Boelen in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    Why, thank you. Now you know!
     
    I finally got around to making some new videos based on your suggestions. First up, @JohnnyD's resequencing of The Hunt:
     
     

     
    I can see where you were going with this, but the musical shift at 0:27 doesn't really make sense in the middle of that shot. It lines up nicely at 0:38, though. But there's lots of places where it feels just slightly off.
     
    As I was editing this again, I realised there's a bunch of weird continuitiy errors in the sequence. Roland's hat switches on and off his head, the guy being punched through the jeep is Carter, who is supposed to be in the car with Dieter at this point, and when we cut to Dieter and Carter in their car, there's a shot that clearly shows Burke driving behind them in the position he's in when he arrives at the Pachy.
     
    This led me to believe the original sequencing might have been more like this:
     

     
    But then, when you put The Hunt to it, it doesn't really sync up either. I know I excluded the heroes overlooking the chaos, but that didn't help either. And I'm starting to wonder if the fade out at the end is supposed to play over Burke's arrival. But then why have Roland direct the snagger to the pachy? Questions, questions... So I guess the video above serves the purpose of both showing you a possible alternate sequencing and demonstrating how impossible it is to properly sync this thing.  
     
     
    I tried this, but it doesn't work as well. If you do this, a lot of music seems to go on for too long. There's wondrous infant music for Sarah staring down a full grown T-Rex and the percussion that follows that doesn't end until we're a short bit into the next scene with Eddie and Kelly, which is a bit awkward. I also maintain that when to cues are labeled Part I and Part II, they're supposed to segue into each other. So I'm sticking to the original version I made of this (although I've updated the transition, so it should be a little more accurate now). If you really want to see this alternate interpretation though, you can do so here.
  10. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    I was wondering if that was the case.
     
    Good thing I prepared an alternate version then. Enjoy this as a little bonus.
     

     
    18. Visitor in San Diego, part 2 */Ludlow's End */Tranquilizer Dart */The Lost World (alternate)/Jurassic Park Theme (End Credits) *
    13M2 The Streets of San Diego
    13M3/14M1 Ludlow’s End
    14M2 The Saving Dart
    [unknown]
    Here is the finale again, but this time with The Lost World kicking off the end credits, before going into the Jurassic Park Theme.
  11. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Disco Stu in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    I was wondering if that was the case.
     
    Good thing I prepared an alternate version then. Enjoy this as a little bonus.
     

     
    18. Visitor in San Diego, part 2 */Ludlow's End */Tranquilizer Dart */The Lost World (alternate)/Jurassic Park Theme (End Credits) *
    13M2 The Streets of San Diego
    13M3/14M1 Ludlow’s End
    14M2 The Saving Dart
    [unknown]
    Here is the finale again, but this time with The Lost World kicking off the end credits, before going into the Jurassic Park Theme.
  12. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Muad'Dib in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    It has been a very, very busy day today. But here's a final treat for you guys before I'm off to bed!
     

     
    17. Visitor in San Diego, part 2 */Ludlow's End */Tranquilizer Dart */Jurassic Park Theme (End Credits) */The Lost World (alternate)
    13M2 The Streets of San Diego
    13M3/14M1 Ludlow’s End
    14M2 The Saving Dart
    [unknown]
    And here we come to our final video. The Streets of San Diego was written to start right on the smash cut to the screaming woman, but the first forty seconds of the track are dropped in favor of silence. Instead, in the final film the music starts as we cut inside the video store. The whole sequence is scored with appropriately wild action music, as if we're watching a circus gone wild. There's a small edit as the crowd of police cars comes across the T-Rex, before the percussion returns - heavier than ever - for Malcolm and Sarah's final chase.
     
    The Streets of San Diego goes straight into Ludlow's End, which is written to overlap. A huge part of this cue is unused. Only the first fifteen seconds are in the film. The atmospherics for Ludlow exploring the cargo hold are dropped in favor of silence. A big action piece was written for Ludlow's demise and Sarah and Malcolm's race across the ship's deck, but that was all scrapped and replaced with the concert version of the Lost World theme (including the alternate opening that was first released on the La-La Land set). It's one of the most noticeable tonal shifts between written score and final film mix. The written version extends the pulse-pounding action climax until the moment Sarah fires the tranquilizer dart, whereas the film version heralds the arrival of the adult rex as the start of the triumph. Using the adventurous main theme for a major character's death is a rather gleeful relishing in "punishing" the bad guy and I always felt it was an odd choice. But I guess Spielberg wanted one more rousing rendition of the theme to signal the action's end. In the final film, the Lost World theme feels like the main theme of the film, but listening to the written score, I'd argue the film's main theme is actually The Island's Voice (although it is not used here).
     
    Ludlow's End is supposed to flow straight into The Saving Dart. Of course, the end of Ludlow's End is unused and replaced by the Lost World theme. The first eight seconds of The Saving Dart are also unused. Instead, the T-Rex's roar plays over silence and the music fades in as we cut to Malcolm watching the hatch close. The final cue before the end credits then offers some relief after all the action as the film wraps up. The Lost World theme gets a gentle rendition as we see the Venture heading back to Isla Sorna. Jurassic Park's main theme is reprised as John Hammond makes his final appearance. In the film, the adventure theme from the first film follows this and takes us straight into the end credits, but this transition was created editorially. The score's original ending features an ending that is entirely different. Gentle violins and a ghostly synth voice take us back to Isla Sorna, where dinosaurs now live in the wild, completely out of man's control. It is a more downbeat ending that underscores the environmental message, but arguably not the tone you want the audience to leave the cinema with.
     
    The edit at the end of The Saving Dart leads straight into a rendition of the adventure theme for the start of the end credits. This is followed by the Lost World concert suite for the second part of the end credits. Because I have eliminated this edit by restoring the original ending of The Saving Dart, I have included tracks 13 and 14 of disc 4 of the La-La Land Records set for your listening pleasure to round out the experience. To facilitate this length, the end credits scroll has been slowed down to run about a third longer.
     
     
    So there it is. I hope you have all enjoyed these remixes. Researching, remixing and restoring The Lost World was certainly an undertaking, but I've really enjoyed the process. The Lost World: Jurassic Park as interpreted by John Williams appears to be a very different film. Overall, the final film mix favors silence in several places (not uncommon for a Jurassic Park movie as we saw last time) or the adventurous tones of the Lost World theme to soothe the audience and remind them they're watching a popcorn adventure film.
     
    What do you think of the differences? Do you have a favorite piece of dropped music? And what other score would you like to see remixed and restored?
  13. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    It has been a very, very busy day today. But here's a final treat for you guys before I'm off to bed!
     

     
    17. Visitor in San Diego, part 2 */Ludlow's End */Tranquilizer Dart */Jurassic Park Theme (End Credits) */The Lost World (alternate)
    13M2 The Streets of San Diego
    13M3/14M1 Ludlow’s End
    14M2 The Saving Dart
    [unknown]
    And here we come to our final video. The Streets of San Diego was written to start right on the smash cut to the screaming woman, but the first forty seconds of the track are dropped in favor of silence. Instead, in the final film the music starts as we cut inside the video store. The whole sequence is scored with appropriately wild action music, as if we're watching a circus gone wild. There's a small edit as the crowd of police cars comes across the T-Rex, before the percussion returns - heavier than ever - for Malcolm and Sarah's final chase.
     
    The Streets of San Diego goes straight into Ludlow's End, which is written to overlap. A huge part of this cue is unused. Only the first fifteen seconds are in the film. The atmospherics for Ludlow exploring the cargo hold are dropped in favor of silence. A big action piece was written for Ludlow's demise and Sarah and Malcolm's race across the ship's deck, but that was all scrapped and replaced with the concert version of the Lost World theme (including the alternate opening that was first released on the La-La Land set). It's one of the most noticeable tonal shifts between written score and final film mix. The written version extends the pulse-pounding action climax until the moment Sarah fires the tranquilizer dart, whereas the film version heralds the arrival of the adult rex as the start of the triumph. Using the adventurous main theme for a major character's death is a rather gleeful relishing in "punishing" the bad guy and I always felt it was an odd choice. But I guess Spielberg wanted one more rousing rendition of the theme to signal the action's end. In the final film, the Lost World theme feels like the main theme of the film, but listening to the written score, I'd argue the film's main theme is actually The Island's Voice (although it is not used here).
     
    Ludlow's End is supposed to flow straight into The Saving Dart. Of course, the end of Ludlow's End is unused and replaced by the Lost World theme. The first eight seconds of The Saving Dart are also unused. Instead, the T-Rex's roar plays over silence and the music fades in as we cut to Malcolm watching the hatch close. The final cue before the end credits then offers some relief after all the action as the film wraps up. The Lost World theme gets a gentle rendition as we see the Venture heading back to Isla Sorna. Jurassic Park's main theme is reprised as John Hammond makes his final appearance. In the film, the adventure theme from the first film follows this and takes us straight into the end credits, but this transition was created editorially. The score's original ending features an ending that is entirely different. Gentle violins and a ghostly synth voice take us back to Isla Sorna, where dinosaurs now live in the wild, completely out of man's control. It is a more downbeat ending that underscores the environmental message, but arguably not the tone you want the audience to leave the cinema with.
     
    The edit at the end of The Saving Dart leads straight into a rendition of the adventure theme for the start of the end credits. This is followed by the Lost World concert suite for the second part of the end credits. Because I have eliminated this edit by restoring the original ending of The Saving Dart, I have included tracks 13 and 14 of disc 4 of the La-La Land Records set for your listening pleasure to round out the experience. To facilitate this length, the end credits scroll has been slowed down to run about a third longer.
     
     
    So there it is. I hope you have all enjoyed these remixes. Researching, remixing and restoring The Lost World was certainly an undertaking, but I've really enjoyed the process. The Lost World: Jurassic Park as interpreted by John Williams appears to be a very different film. Overall, the final film mix favors silence in several places (not uncommon for a Jurassic Park movie as we saw last time) or the adventurous tones of the Lost World theme to soothe the audience and remind them they're watching a popcorn adventure film.
     
    What do you think of the differences? Do you have a favorite piece of dropped music? And what other score would you like to see remixed and restored?
  14. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    I moved the search of the ship around a bit and found it did indeed sync a bit bitter if we account for a cut somewhere around the time the Rex escapes. I first had a blank screen between the reaction shot of Ludlow and the Rex leaving the ship. It was long enough so that the start of Monster on the Loose started as the Rex bursted through the doors. But that meant the music that's there in the film is in the wrong place.
     
    The first two bars of Monster on the Loose - which is the part at the beginning that's unused - are marked "optional repeat" on the sheet music. So what if they were really recorded as an option and not necessarily meant to be there? Watch what happens when I trim those two bars and leave the footage intact. The music that's in the film for the Rex breaking free stays in place, but the footage of the search across the ship moves forward in relation to The Wrecked Ship by about eight seconds. And I think this actually works much better! Check it out (resynced material at 0:44-2:12):
     

  15. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    16. Heading North */Ludlow’s Speech */The Wrecked Ship */Monster on the Loose */Visitor in San Diego (part 1) *
    12M2 Heading North
    12M3 Ludlow’s Speech
    12M4 Wompi’s Wrench
    12M5 Monster on the Loose
    13M1 A Neighborhood Visitor
    NOTE: This video and the accompanying text have been updated to reflect new findings discussed below.
     
    Heading North is supposed to start soon after High Bar and Ceiling Tiles, right as we first see the captured Tyrannosaur. Contemplative strings underscore the sight of the captive T-Rex and Ludlow’s conversation with Roland. After Roland speaks his final line, the music swells. It’s here that the score comes in in the film. As our heroes fly over the site and spot the captive T-Rex, the Lost World theme plays. It’s one of many renditions in the film, but in the score as written, it’s only the second time we hear this theme and we won’t hear it again in this full setting until the end credits. Heading North goes straight into the next cue.
     
    The Island’s Voice is featured prominently in the start of Ludlow’s Speech. It’s set over repeating percussion and an interesting line that’s reminiscent of the synth percussion from Dennis Steals the Embryo. As the S.S. Venture approaches the shore, the music builds. After the dockworkers turn towards the sound of the oncoming boat, the music cuts out in the film, but there’s about another minute of pounding score written for the approach and eventual crash of the Venture.
     
    As The Wrecked Ship starts, The Island’s Voice is now dominating the score, even though we’re now off the island. The first part of this track features the motif in a setting similar to the opening of the film. This cue is entirely unused. Instead, the exploration of the S.S. Venture is mostly accentuated by the sound of the cargo door drive motor. There is also more music than there is film until the score re-enters the film mix. Because both the end of the previous cue and the start of the next are unused, and the track is longer than the scene it accompanies, it’s pretty hard to say for certain where this music goes. For this video, I have synced Ludlow’s Speech and Monster on the Loose to their respective latest and earliest sync points and put in this track so that the start of The Wrecked Ship overlaps with the end of Ludlow’s Speech and the final bars of The Wrecked Ship flow into the start of Monster on the Loose. The most likely trim point I found in this sequence is when Ludlow reaches the deck. Notice the change in the amount of people present when we cut to the wide shot, as well as the security guard standing next to Ludlow suddenly holding a large flashlight.
     
    The first two bars of Monster on the Loose are marked as an "optional repeat" and are not used in the film. The music starts right as the Rex bursts free at bar 3. The original version of this video contained the first two bars of Monster on the Loose with The Wrecked Ship ending right before it. After some discussion (which you can read below) I did some fiddling about and ended up cutting the first two bars of Monster on the Loose, letting The Wrecked Ship go straight into bar 3 of Monster on the Loose. The result of this change was that from the moment we cut back to the film after Ludlow has made his way to the deck, we are now eight seconds earlier in The Wrecked Ship and it lines up much better than the original video.
     
    When Malcolm tells Ludlow “now you’re John Hammond,” the adventure theme appears again - a callback to its use earlier in the score when Malcolm was telling Ludlow he wasn’t Hammond (this happened in The Trek, which was cut from the film and replaced with the Lost World concert sutie). Then, as the Rex crashes through immigration, the movie tracks in music from Visitor in San Diego, but Williams wrote a short fanfare for this moment that will be reprised soon. After the Rex roars into the night, the film returns to the written score for the following dialogue scene.
     
    The very first part of A Neighborhood Visitor, underscoring the Rex walking around a suburban area, is not used in the film. The music comes in as we cut inside. When syncing to this point, the end of Monster on the Loose goes straight into this cue. The "dinosaur in our backyard" scene has the score pretty much intact. Then there are some minor edits as Malcolm and Sarah reach Jurassic Park San Diego, where the deleted fanfare from Monster on the Loose is reprised, this time with the adventure theme overlaid. A Neighborhood Visitor was coupled with The Streets of San Diego on the original album and the La-La Land Release, but they are actually two separate cues with a few seconds of silence in between. This was originally the last unscored moment, although there is still a bunch of dropped and replaced music to come in our final video...
  16. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    15. The Raptors Appear */High Bar and Ceiling Tiles *
    11M2 The Raptors Appear
    11M3/12M1 High Bar and Ceiling Tiles
    The following cues have a large number of small edits. This effects-heavy sequence was probably trimmed down in various places after Williams scored it. In one case, there's several music edits within a continuous shot. For that part I just synced the picture to the music (which is why you'll see some blank screens within an unbroken shot). I also don't think this sequence was heavily restructured - just trimmed.
     
    In the film, the end of The Raptors Appear is replaced with tracked music from High Bar and Ceiling Tiles to underscore the false relief of Kelly and Sarah finding a way out. But as written, the percussion moves straight on into the next cue.
     
    High Bar and Ceiling Tiles is another edited track. During the first half, there's tiny edits at several points. The pause after Kelly lands is slightly longer in the film to give room to Malcolm's line. The cue continues after this pause for Sarah's escape to the roof.
     
    After distracting the raptors with a bunch of loose roof tiles, Sarah tumbles down a hole and escapes. In the film, her reunion with Kelly and Malcolm and their dash towards the helicopter is tracked with the Lost World Theme concert suite, giving a sense of relief and closure to the island adventure. But as written, the piece continues in much the same way, keeping the tension going all the way until they reach the chopper and embark. As the group runs towards the helicopter, the Island’s Voice theme is interwoven, repeated in full force, backed by synth voices as the helicopter takes off. The last part of the track, scoring our heroes inside the flying chopper is used in the film.
  17. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    Why, thank you. Now you know!
     
    I finally got around to making some new videos based on your suggestions. First up, @JohnnyD's resequencing of The Hunt:
     
     

     
    I can see where you were going with this, but the musical shift at 0:27 doesn't really make sense in the middle of that shot. It lines up nicely at 0:38, though. But there's lots of places where it feels just slightly off.
     
    As I was editing this again, I realised there's a bunch of weird continuitiy errors in the sequence. Roland's hat switches on and off his head, the guy being punched through the jeep is Carter, who is supposed to be in the car with Dieter at this point, and when we cut to Dieter and Carter in their car, there's a shot that clearly shows Burke driving behind them in the position he's in when he arrives at the Pachy.
     
    This led me to believe the original sequencing might have been more like this:
     

     
    But then, when you put The Hunt to it, it doesn't really sync up either. I know I excluded the heroes overlooking the chaos, but that didn't help either. And I'm starting to wonder if the fade out at the end is supposed to play over Burke's arrival. But then why have Roland direct the snagger to the pachy? Questions, questions... So I guess the video above serves the purpose of both showing you a possible alternate sequencing and demonstrating how impossible it is to properly sync this thing.  
     
     
    I tried this, but it doesn't work as well. If you do this, a lot of music seems to go on for too long. There's wondrous infant music for Sarah staring down a full grown T-Rex and the percussion that follows that doesn't end until we're a short bit into the next scene with Eddie and Kelly, which is a bit awkward. I also maintain that when to cues are labeled Part I and Part II, they're supposed to segue into each other. So I'm sticking to the original version I made of this (although I've updated the transition, so it should be a little more accurate now). If you really want to see this alternate interpretation though, you can do so here.
  18. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    14. The Long Grass **/Finding Camp Jurassic *
    10M2 Steiner in the Grass
    10M3/11M1 After the Fall
    Steiner in the Grass, named for its homage to Max Steiner’s King Kong music, plays mostly as is, but it’s slightly longer than the accompanying scene. The scene was likely trimmed and some of the score was removed with it.
     
    After the group slides down the hill, the next cue starts, overlapping with Steiner in the Grass. The opening atmospherics are longer on album than they are in the film. There may have been some trimming at the start of the scene. Nick then moves into the island’s abandoned worker village. The adventure theme from Jurassic Park reappears as Nick discovers a mural painting of the original park. There seems to be a slight pause in the score when Nick opens the door, as the music goes out of sync there. I have recreated the pause by editing the music accordingly. The final part of the track, where the adventure theme reappears over drums is unused. It starts right as Nick switches the power back on. The music ends at a slightly odd place, so I do wonder if this scene was re-edited after Williams scored it, but I have decided to let the scene play as it does in the film.
  19. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    13. The Compys! part 2/Ripples *
    9M3/10MA The Compys Dine
    10M1 Rialto Ripples
    Frantic strings and winds underscore Dieter’s death in The Compys Dine, before we go back to more atmospheric material. The Island’s Voice makes an appearance as Roland departs on a search for Dieter. The score finally settles on more moody atmosphere as we see everyone asleep in a new camp. This cue is used in its entirety and segues straight into the next one. It is also the last cue in the entire film that appears unedited!
     
    Upon his unsuccessful return, Roland sets up the next stage of the plan: to wait until morning and then go for the camp that’s nearby. Some tense atmospheric underscore accompanies this scene.
     
    After that, Malcolm is seen walking around the camp when the ground shakes and ripples form in small puddles of water around him. Percussion starts. In the film, this is mixed remarkably low. It builds over Sarah’s realization that her jacket has drawn the T-Rexes and the Rex entering the tent. The music is also noticeably different from this point on, consisting of music layered and tracked from elsewhere in the film. Williams’ original score continues to build upon the percussion until Kelly wakes up. Then, the percussion drops out and tense stringwork scores the newly building panic in Kelly - an interesting shift in musical perspective.
     
    Once Carter wakes up and starts screaming, the music returns to its written form. There’s an edit when Malcolm is seen crawling across the ground, cutting about eight seconds of score. Parts of Truck Stop are re-recorded to underscore the panic as one of the Rexes gives chase, along with some new material. Frantic percussion returns as Roland pulls out a tranquilizer to shoot the other Rex. The music finally culminates into a final percussion hit as the female Rex’s head bursts through the waterfall for a tense scene that plays without score.
  20. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    12. The Compys! part 1
    9M2 The Compys!
    Just a short one today, with nothing spectacular going on in terms of unused or material. This brief cue is used in the film as written.
  21. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    11. On the Glass/Rescuing Sarah **/Reading the Map */The Trek *
    7M2/8M1 Pain of Glass
    8M2 Truck Stop
    8M3 Reading the Map
    8M4/9M1 The Trek
    Here we come to a long stretch of overlapping cues that had several parts dropped or replaced by other music.
     
    Pain of Glass plays in its entirety in the film. It’s the first cue to do so since Fire at Camp and the first album track since Revealing the Plans.
     
    Pain of Glass then goes straight into Truck Stop. The final fanfare starts slightly later in the film and is then microedited before it finishes, but otherwise, this track plays as is. There are some synchronization problems with the final part, as the film appears to be longer than the music and there was likely some looping going on. For the purpose of this video, I have trimmed the shot of the tire rising up by about a third of a second.
     
    Truck Stop goes straight into Reading the Map, the first half of which is dropped from the film. The music doesn’t come in until Ludlow mentions velociraptors, a minute forty into the piece. For the occasion, Williams reprises the carnivore motif from the first film. When syncing to this point, the start overlaps with the end of Rescuing Sarah, eliminating the short rest as the two teams get to know each other. When the music comes in it is mixed notably low, as the sudden start of percussion might have been slightly jarring.
     
    Then, out of the five and a half minutes of music written for The Trek, only about forty seconds was used. The first part of this track, which is supposed to overlap with the end of Reading the Map, was infamously replaced by the concert version of the Lost World theme in the final film. The driving percussion that underscores the journey in the original version is more subdued and ominous than the heroic theme. The adventure theme from Jurassic Park makes a brief appearance when Malcolm mentions Hammond to Ludlow. There’s some atmospheric scoring for the group’s stop and Dieter heading into the woods. In the film, the written music isn’t heard until Dieter is alone and encounters the first compy. The music drops out after the animal appears. The music for him getting lost and rolling down the hill is unused.
     
    When syncing this track to the film, the first part overlaps slightly clumsily with the end of Reading the Map. The start may not be 100% accurate, but I’ve synced up the used part halfway towards the end and let both the music and the film run as is.
     
    So there it is. About 17 minutes of music, a lot of which went unused. Although I can see why. The movie needs a brief "mission statement" after the trucks go over the cliff, so the groups come together and come up with a new plan. As they set out, the movie can't slow down, so there's some heroic music, followed by some silence to let the audience breathe and build tension before the compys are thrown back into the mix. Still, it's interesting to see what could have been...
     
    By the way, I've read your comments regarding the previous few videos. I'm working on some alternates for your viewing pleasure, but they probably won't be up until tomorrow or the day after. Stay tuned!
  22. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    10. Up in a Basket */In the Trailer *
    6M2/7M1 Part I Up in a Basket
    6M2/7M1 Part II Up in a Basket
    This six-minute sequence features almost five minutes of unused music. Of the first cue, only the first minute is used in the film. The music cuts off the moment Malcolm, Eddie and Kelly hear the distant T-Rex roar. Williams then proceeds to underscore the mounting tension as Malcolm has to choose between his daughter and his girlfriend and the danger continues to grow closer every second.
     
    In the Trailer is marked as Part II of Up in a Basket on the sheet music and it's entirely unused. There’s a stretch of silence longer than this track until On the Glass begins, but the Part II title is indication enough to me that it’s meant to overlap with Up in a Basket. This also produces a few interesting sync points. The infant motif returns for the baby Rex making contact with its parents while it’s still in the truck and the percussion returns the moment Nick removes the animal’s muzzle. All this plays without score in the final film, playing to the danger of the Rexes outside, rather than the miracle of parenting dinosaurs. This is an action adventure, after all.
     
    The attack on the trailers plays without score, until Sarah falls down the dangling truck and lands on the rear window. This will kick off an almost 18 minute long stretch of film that was originally scored back to back, but had various parts dropped or replaced with tracked music. Tomorrow, we're going to see all of those 18 minutes with score!
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    9. Spilling Petrol and Horning In *
    5M3/6M1 Spilling Petrol
    5M3/6M1 Part II Horning In
    Here we get to another sequence that was quite heavily cut down: the nighttime camp sequence. The conversation overlooking the camp is unscored in the film. When we cut to Ludlow down below, we're already 45 seconds into the track. Between these scenes, the August 22 script features a lot more stuff. There's much more dialogue between the team on the ridge, featuring Nick recounting a previous encounter with Roland and Sarah mentioning her fear of heights. Then there is a scene where Ludlow gets drunk and accidentally breaks the baby T-Rex’s leg (so this explains that it wasn’t Roland or Ajay who broke the baby’s leg to get it to cry for its parents - which always seemed particularly cruel to me - and why Ludlow is staggering about as he gives his business presentation).
     

     
    There is no indication these parts were scored. As scripted, the baby T-Rex scene would certainly be longer than 45 seconds. But the very next part has Nick and Sarah sabotaging the InGen group’s vehicles and draining their fuel tanks. Evidence of these scenes exists in published stills as well as of course the cue title Spilling Petrol.
     
    55 IN THE CAMP, they creep along, hiding behind a stack of fuel barrels. They lean around the edge for a look. They're directly behind the row of vehicles. They move into the open, covering the ground between them and the jeep. Reaching them, Nick hits the dirt and wriggles under the first one. Sarah stands lookout. UNDER THE JEEP, Nick pulls the bolt cutter from his back pocket. He squirms along until he finds the jeep's fuel line -- -- and he snips it. He ducks out of the way just as the stream of fuel begins to pour into the dirt. SARAH, moves slowly down the line, standing watch as Nick crawls out from under the first jeep and proceeds to the second. She hears another SNIP, then keeps moving, to cover him as he moves to the third.
     

     
    So I assume the first part of Spilling Petrol was meant to accompany at least this last scene that was cut. So rather than starting the track early and having the first part play over the conversation atop the ridge, this video starts with almost a minute of blank screen, representing the deleted scene above.
     
    The sequence cutting between Ludlow’s speech and Nick and Sarah’s trek across the camp was also probably trimmed at various points. Because the rest of the track, leading up to the Triceratops charging into the camp, is heavily edited. I don’t know quite where and if the picture cuts coincide with the music edits, but for the purpose of this video I have synced up the score to the places it appears in the film as much as possible, so you at least get a sense of how much was removed. The August 22 script that I've been referring to doesn't actually feature Ludlow's speech (most of it is featured in the board room scene at the start of the film instead). In this version, he is talking to Burke about the progress they've made when the triceratops bursts through their tent.
     
    So clearly, this is a part of the film that went through many changes late in the game.
     
    The final part of the track, Horning In, underscoring the dinosaurs rampaging across the camp and Nick freeing the baby T-Rex to the sounds of the infant motif appears pretty much as written, save for a few micro-edits around effects shots.
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    I could give it a go, but I probably won't get around to it before the weekend.
     
     
    Yes. As it is now, it also feels odd to me that the only "reaction" shot we see of the hero group is the back of their heads. Which is why I think I may need to put the shot of Nick back in.
     
     
     
    Yeah, that scene gave me a headache. But it feels like it has the most "subdued" part of the track underneath it now. And it still feels a bit off. Of course, the music is now mixed much, much louder than it would be in the film, so that might give you a skewed view of the scene.
     
     
    This I highly doubt. But it does have a notable constant drive compared to other tracks, rather than a lot of sync points. Then again, I think the action music in this score overall has less sync points than, say, its prdecessor.
     
    That being said, it's on to the next track!
     

     
    8. Big Feet *
    5M2 Big Feet
    The next cue starts soon after where The Round Up ended. As our heroes look down on the events below, Williams switches from action to drama. Below in the valley, Roland, Burke and Ajay are huddled over a T-Rex footprint. After Burke identifies the print, there’s about 25 seconds of unused music. In the script, the scene proceeds with Ajay explaining where the Rex went by examining the prints:
     
    AJAY, Roland’s tracker, studies the rex’s trail. It goes sideways, bisecting the game trail. AJAY He sprang from the foliage. Picked off a calf -- that’s this smaller set of tracks that disappears. Then carried it back into the bush. That way. Roland gets up and goes to his jeep. At the back, he opens a wood and leather case, revealing -- -- his gun. It’s an antique elephant gun, double barreled .600 Nitro Express. Nearly a hundred years old, its rosewood stock is worn buttery smooth, but is nicked and scarred by two lifetimes of campaigns. Cape buffalo are delicately engraved along its silver breech.  
    It is quite possible this was still in the version of the film Williams scored. After this, Roland heads to his car to get his rifle, which is where the film picks up. As the cue ends, we get to the scene with Dieter, Burke and the compy, which was scripted to go before the footprint scene (notice how Dieter and Burke end their scene in the positions they start in when Roland calls Burke over), but I see no indication that suggests these scenes were in another order when Williams scored this sequence.
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    7. Corporate Helicopters */The Hunt *
    4M2 Corporate Choppers
    4M3/5M1 The Round Up
    So now we get to... The Hunt. Or The Round Up as it was originally called. It took a lot of experimenting and I think I still haven't gotten quite as close to what it was originally like as I'd want to. This time, rather than posting just one video, I'll try to take you through the process and show some different results. The final video featuring both The Round Up and the overlapping preceding cue is at the very bottom of this post.
     
    But we start off with Corporate Choppers.
     

     
    In the film, the music doesn’t start until we actually see the choppers, but by then we’re already a few seconds into the cue. As you can see, the score now starts right when Kelly first notices the distant sounds of the choppers. The arrival of this other team also signals a significant change in the score's sound: as the already dubious tranquility of the island is about to be brutally disturbed, the percussion becomes the driving factor in the music. This percussive drive will become the signature sound of The Lost World.
     
    The first part of Corporate Choppers is heavily edited in the film, with large chunks lifted out. It’s likely we originally saw more of Ludlow’s crew landing and unloading and the team's reactions to their arrival. Now, we simply cut from approaching helicopters to the all-terrain vehicles racing across the island. The Island’s voice is featured prominently throughout the cue as the motif is repeated and swells over the arrival of the antagonists.
     
    There is some looped music in the conversation between Ludlow and Roland, as the scene is longer than what we hear on album. I’ve synced the end of the track to the film, so when we first cut to Roland and Ludlow, the music isn’t quite the same as what we hear in the picture.
     
    When Corporate Choppers ends, The Round Up is supposed to begin right away. This track is really hard to sync up. The Round Up is particularly difficult to edit back into the picture, as the cue is entirely unused, likely written for an alternate edit of the sequence and features very few possible sync points. For my first attempt, I simply started the track The Hunt right where Corprorate Choppers ends and let it play as is:
     

     
    As you can see, it doesn’t quite sync up. So I started tinkering about and ended up with some alternate versions that might represent the original sequence better.
     
    By experiment, I started by removing a few shots that I felt where out of place. I have cut the shot of Ludlow racing the camouflage as he watches the motorcycle race amongst the dinosaurs, as well as the shot of Nick placing his long-range microphone on the edge of the cliff. This seemed to solve some minor syncing issues, but still felt off (if you really want to, you can view this version here).
     
    Then, in addition to cutting the aforementioned shots, I rearranged some of the scenes, basically switching the introduction of Burke with the capture of the infant Pachysephalosaurus. Musically, this seemed to make slightly more sense. Of course, all this still doesn't account for other possible edits. For one thing, I have only moved entire shots around, while some of this might have been trimmed or extended after Williams scored the sequence. And this version sort of hinges on me removing the right bits. But what you see here is probably my best guess at this point:
     

     
    And finally, here is the entire thing, with Corporate Choppers leading into The Hunt set to the re-edited sequence:
     

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