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Mr. Breathmask

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  1. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    7. Corporate Helicopters */The Hunt *
    4M2 Corporate Choppers
    4M3/5M1 The Round Up
    So now we get to... The Hunt. Or The Round Up as it was originally called. It took a lot of experimenting and I think I still haven't gotten quite as close to what it was originally like as I'd want to. This time, rather than posting just one video, I'll try to take you through the process and show some different results. The final video featuring both The Round Up and the overlapping preceding cue is at the very bottom of this post.
     
    But we start off with Corporate Choppers.
     

     
    In the film, the music doesn’t start until we actually see the choppers, but by then we’re already a few seconds into the cue. As you can see, the score now starts right when Kelly first notices the distant sounds of the choppers. The arrival of this other team also signals a significant change in the score's sound: as the already dubious tranquility of the island is about to be brutally disturbed, the percussion becomes the driving factor in the music. This percussive drive will become the signature sound of The Lost World.
     
    The first part of Corporate Choppers is heavily edited in the film, with large chunks lifted out. It’s likely we originally saw more of Ludlow’s crew landing and unloading and the team's reactions to their arrival. Now, we simply cut from approaching helicopters to the all-terrain vehicles racing across the island. The Island’s voice is featured prominently throughout the cue as the motif is repeated and swells over the arrival of the antagonists.
     
    There is some looped music in the conversation between Ludlow and Roland, as the scene is longer than what we hear on album. I’ve synced the end of the track to the film, so when we first cut to Roland and Ludlow, the music isn’t quite the same as what we hear in the picture.
     
    When Corporate Choppers ends, The Round Up is supposed to begin right away. This track is really hard to sync up. The Round Up is particularly difficult to edit back into the picture, as the cue is entirely unused, likely written for an alternate edit of the sequence and features very few possible sync points. For my first attempt, I simply started the track The Hunt right where Corprorate Choppers ends and let it play as is:
     

     
    As you can see, it doesn’t quite sync up. So I started tinkering about and ended up with some alternate versions that might represent the original sequence better.
     
    By experiment, I started by removing a few shots that I felt where out of place. I have cut the shot of Ludlow racing the camouflage as he watches the motorcycle race amongst the dinosaurs, as well as the shot of Nick placing his long-range microphone on the edge of the cliff. This seemed to solve some minor syncing issues, but still felt off (if you really want to, you can view this version here).
     
    Then, in addition to cutting the aforementioned shots, I rearranged some of the scenes, basically switching the introduction of Burke with the capture of the infant Pachysephalosaurus. Musically, this seemed to make slightly more sense. Of course, all this still doesn't account for other possible edits. For one thing, I have only moved entire shots around, while some of this might have been trimmed or extended after Williams scored the sequence. And this version sort of hinges on me removing the right bits. But what you see here is probably my best guess at this point:
     

     
    And finally, here is the entire thing, with Corporate Choppers leading into The Hunt set to the re-edited sequence:
     

  2. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Brundlefly in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    7. Corporate Helicopters */The Hunt *
    4M2 Corporate Choppers
    4M3/5M1 The Round Up
    So now we get to... The Hunt. Or The Round Up as it was originally called. It took a lot of experimenting and I think I still haven't gotten quite as close to what it was originally like as I'd want to. This time, rather than posting just one video, I'll try to take you through the process and show some different results. The final video featuring both The Round Up and the overlapping preceding cue is at the very bottom of this post.
     
    But we start off with Corporate Choppers.
     

     
    In the film, the music doesn’t start until we actually see the choppers, but by then we’re already a few seconds into the cue. As you can see, the score now starts right when Kelly first notices the distant sounds of the choppers. The arrival of this other team also signals a significant change in the score's sound: as the already dubious tranquility of the island is about to be brutally disturbed, the percussion becomes the driving factor in the music. This percussive drive will become the signature sound of The Lost World.
     
    The first part of Corporate Choppers is heavily edited in the film, with large chunks lifted out. It’s likely we originally saw more of Ludlow’s crew landing and unloading and the team's reactions to their arrival. Now, we simply cut from approaching helicopters to the all-terrain vehicles racing across the island. The Island’s voice is featured prominently throughout the cue as the motif is repeated and swells over the arrival of the antagonists.
     
    There is some looped music in the conversation between Ludlow and Roland, as the scene is longer than what we hear on album. I’ve synced the end of the track to the film, so when we first cut to Roland and Ludlow, the music isn’t quite the same as what we hear in the picture.
     
    When Corporate Choppers ends, The Round Up is supposed to begin right away. This track is really hard to sync up. The Round Up is particularly difficult to edit back into the picture, as the cue is entirely unused, likely written for an alternate edit of the sequence and features very few possible sync points. For my first attempt, I simply started the track The Hunt right where Corprorate Choppers ends and let it play as is:
     

     
    As you can see, it doesn’t quite sync up. So I started tinkering about and ended up with some alternate versions that might represent the original sequence better.
     
    By experiment, I started by removing a few shots that I felt where out of place. I have cut the shot of Ludlow racing the camouflage as he watches the motorcycle race amongst the dinosaurs, as well as the shot of Nick placing his long-range microphone on the edge of the cliff. This seemed to solve some minor syncing issues, but still felt off (if you really want to, you can view this version here).
     
    Then, in addition to cutting the aforementioned shots, I rearranged some of the scenes, basically switching the introduction of Burke with the capture of the infant Pachysephalosaurus. Musically, this seemed to make slightly more sense. Of course, all this still doesn't account for other possible edits. For one thing, I have only moved entire shots around, while some of this might have been trimmed or extended after Williams scored the sequence. And this version sort of hinges on me removing the right bits. But what you see here is probably my best guess at this point:
     

     
    And finally, here is the entire thing, with Corporate Choppers leading into The Hunt set to the re-edited sequence:
     

  3. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Amer in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    Nope. I don't have a personal edit. The La-La Land release is perfect as it is.
  4. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    6. Fire at Camp
    4M1 Fire at Camp
    A very brief cue underscores the fire and the discovery of Kelly. It was paired wirh the next cue on the La-La Land set, but in the film there's several minutes of silence in between. This cue is used in its entirety.
     
    The next two cues overlap, so tomorrow, we get to look at a whole bunch of unused music. Including... The Hunt!
  5. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    5. The Stegosaurus, part 2 *
    3M3 Finding the Baby
    This cue features the first significant stretch of music that was dropped from the film in its entirety. The brief bit of action scoring that starts the cue was dropped in favor of silence. It amounts to about thirty seconds of unused music (and we're about to see much bigger pieces dropped).
     
    The film picks up the music as Sarah starts taking pictures of the baby stegosaurus, again underscoring the wonder of nature. This particular sound and motif used for the encounter with the baby stegosaurus will return when we see the infant animals in captivity and will culminate in a piece of music for the baby T-Rex that was dropped from the film in its entirety. We’ll call this the infant motif. The cue continues as written, except for a small edit as the stegosauruses attack Sarah. It’s likely some last-minute trims were made to the effect shots. Notice how the percussion is present, but works in tandem with the orchestra, rather than driving the music forward. We won’t hear that until the film’s antagonist team arrives. The music then fades out slightly earlier than it does on album, leaving Nick’s speech about winning the Pullitzer Prize unscored.
  6. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Will in The girlfriend who told her suicidal boyfriend via text to "just do it"   
    So now you know. Don't make jokes about suicide to suicidal  people.
  7. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    4. The Stegosaurus, part 1
    3M2 The Stegosaurus
    For the first appearance of these majestic herbivores, Williams employs a sound reminiscent of the wonder featured in My Friend, the Brachiosaurus (albeit with a slightly darker tone befitting the sequel score). This cue was coupled with the next cue on the original soundtrack album and the La-La Land release, but they’re actually two cues separated by a few minutes of musical silence in the film. This cue is used in its entirety.
     
    Tomorrow, we get our first significant piece of dropped music!
  8. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Gruesome Son of a Bitch in No Time To Die (James Bond #25)   
    Ridley? Is that you?
  9. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Amer in Will we see a new box set for 40 years of Star Wars?   
    Oh, I'm fine with people wanting to buy vinyl.
     
    But what pisses me off is stuff like the remastering of the original Star Wars trilogy albums Sony did last year. Those were released digitally and on vinyl, but not on CD. The point here is that absence of a CD release bothers me more than the existence of the vinyl.
  10. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from mstrox in the mstrox thread   
    What is this thread and why is it six pages long already?
  11. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Jay in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park
     
     
    Quick links:
     
    1. Universal Logo/The Island's Voice **
    2. Revealing the Plans
    3. To the Island **
    4. The Stegosaurus, part 1
    5. The Stegosaurus, part 2 *
    6. Fire at Camp
    7. Corporate Helicopters */The Hunt *
    7a. The Hunt (alternate configurations) *
    8. Big Feet *
    9. Spilling Petrol and Horning In *
    10. Up in a Basket */In the Trailer *
    11. On the Glass/Rescuing Sarah **/Reading the Map */The Trek *
    12. The Compys! part 1
    13. The Compys! part 2/Ripples *
    14. The Long Grass **/Finding Camp Jurassic *
    15. The Raptors Appear */High Bar and Ceiling Tiles *
    16. Heading North */Ludlow's Speech */The Wrecked Ship */Monster on the Loose */Visitor in San Diego, part 1 *
    17. Visitor in San Diego, part 2 */Ludlow's End */Tranquilizer Dart */Jurassic Pak Theme (End Credits) */The Lost World (alternate)
    18. Visitor in San Diego, part 2 */Ludlow's End */Tranquilizer Dart */The Lost World (alternate)/Jurassic Pak Theme (End Credits) *
     
    * contains unused music
    ** micro-edited in the film
     
     
    Previous editions:
    Jurassic Park
     
     
    Introduction
     
    Four years after Jurassic Park, Steven Spielberg returned to the world of dinosaurs. The Lost World: Jurassic Park finds us not in another adventure-filled theme park, however, but on another island completely: Isla Sorna, a second InGen facility dubbed Site B. This island is where the real dinosaur research happened. Here, the animals were cloned and brought up, before being moved to Isla Nublar for park display. After a hurricane strikes Isla Sorna, the island is abandoned, leaving the animals to survive on their own. They flourish, and it creates what is known as a Lost World: a habitat stuck in prehistoric time, unlike any ecosystem anywhere in the world.
     
    When the movie opens, the abandoned island is accidentally discovered by a British family on holiday. But when the young daughter encounters a group of small dinosaurs, she is attacked and subsequently hospitalized. Afraid of what this could mean for the animals living on the island, JOHN HAMMOND (Richard Attenborough), businessman turned environmentalist on his deathbed, tries to persuade IAN MALCOLM (Jeff Goldblum) to join an expedition to document the habitat to gather support for preservation. Malcolm, still shaken from his experience on Isla Nublar, rejects Hammond’s offer, but as it turns out, Hammond has already persuaded Malcolm’s girlfriend SARAH HARDING (Julianne Moore) to join the expedition. A strong and independent woman, Sarah jumped at the chance to study the extinct animals in the wild and has already departed to the island. So starts a rescue mission that will have to venture deep into dinosaur territory.
     
    But there’s more trouble on the horizon. In an effort to recoup the losses InGen has suffered after the park incident and the hurricane, PETER LUDLOW (Arliss Howard), the new director of InGen and nephew of John Hammond, has decided to put in motion a plan to gather a bunch of animals off the island to display them in an amphitheater in San Diego. As if trying to navigate an island inhabited with dangerous prehistoric animals isn’t enough, Malcolm and his group now find themselves at odds with Ludlow’s team as well…
     
    The sequel’s setting is much more primal and dangerous than that of its predecessor and harkens back to jungle adventure films of old. Similarly, where Jurassic Park felt like a Greatest Hits collection of Williams’ other works, The Lost World sees the composer venture into unique territory. This score is not anchored around a big, ballsy theme. You may remember the Lost World theme from the film, but in more than one occasion it replaced other original music written for the scene. Not counting the end credits, the theme only appears twice in the original score.  Instead, much of The Lost World is textural, with percussion being the driving force and a single four-note motif representing the island and its inhabitants making numerous appearances.
     
    By the time The Lost World was scored, there was still some work to be done on the film’s picture editing. With Spielberg already off to work on Amistad, the score was recorded to the picture as it was at the time and then adapted in the editing bay to match a later cut. This meant The Lost World ended up with an unusual amount of music edits for a Spielberg film. Several scenes were edited after the scoring and because of the cue titles, we know of at least one scene that was scored and then deleted entirely. The dark tone of the film set by Williams’ music was also alleviated by tracking in the concert suite of the more adventurious Lost World theme at certain points in the film.
     
    The original album assembly for The Lost World: Jurassic Park tried to recreate the kind of sequencing that worked so well for the original film’s album. Unfortunately, devoid of the individual melodies that made Jurassic Park such an interesting listen, the original Lost World album has a hard time matching its predecessor. As Williams develops the score’s sound over its running time, it’s important to hear certain moments before others. The album’s sequencing is all over the place and the score’s original development is lost. It also features one of the most infamously frustrating edits within a track of Williams’ entire discography.
     
    Thanks to La La Land Records, we are now able to hear The Lost World: Jurassic Park in its entirety and in its proper order. The score’s designed progression has been restored, and previously unreleased and unused music has been unearthed. This release deserves all the praise it can get, because The Lost World, as it turns out, is not only a powerhouse action score with a unique sound for Williams, but also a far better work than the film and the original album made it seem.
     
    As I did with Jurassic Park, I’ll be looking at the score restored to picture to see how it works in the film. I will be less analytical in a lot of my descriptions this time, because music theory isn’t my forte and there’s already an excellent analysis on these boards that you can read here. 
     
    Expect to see a lot more edits and and unused music in this one compared to Jurassic Park. When all is said and done, Williams' version of The Lost World is quite different from the final film.
     
    But of course we start at the beginning.
     
     

     
    1. Universal Logo/The Island’s Voice **
    Universal Logo
    1M1 The Island's Voice
    After Jerry Goldsmith’s Universal fanfare announces the start of the film, we are plunged into darkness. The sounds of wind and the deep rumble of the sea (or is it the sound of primordial forces awakening?) takes us into the film, already setting a darker and more ominous tone than the birds chirping over the company logo in the original.
     
    Right away the film’s primary motif is introduced. Taking a cue from the trak's title, we’ll refer to it as the island's voice. It represents danger throughout the score. Already, the first track features some micro-editing in the film. These edits probably occurred because of picture edits made after the score was recorded, so restoration may not be entirely accurate and the music’s placement may not be as intended either. You’ll notice the music ends slightly earlier here than it does in the final scene. In the film, there is a small music loop during the scene’s final shot.
  12. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Disco Stu in REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park   
    REMIXED & RESTORED: The Lost World: Jurassic Park
     
     
    Quick links:
     
    1. Universal Logo/The Island's Voice **
    2. Revealing the Plans
    3. To the Island **
    4. The Stegosaurus, part 1
    5. The Stegosaurus, part 2 *
    6. Fire at Camp
    7. Corporate Helicopters */The Hunt *
    7a. The Hunt (alternate configurations) *
    8. Big Feet *
    9. Spilling Petrol and Horning In *
    10. Up in a Basket */In the Trailer *
    11. On the Glass/Rescuing Sarah **/Reading the Map */The Trek *
    12. The Compys! part 1
    13. The Compys! part 2/Ripples *
    14. The Long Grass **/Finding Camp Jurassic *
    15. The Raptors Appear */High Bar and Ceiling Tiles *
    16. Heading North */Ludlow's Speech */The Wrecked Ship */Monster on the Loose */Visitor in San Diego, part 1 *
    17. Visitor in San Diego, part 2 */Ludlow's End */Tranquilizer Dart */Jurassic Pak Theme (End Credits) */The Lost World (alternate)
    18. Visitor in San Diego, part 2 */Ludlow's End */Tranquilizer Dart */The Lost World (alternate)/Jurassic Pak Theme (End Credits) *
     
    * contains unused music
    ** micro-edited in the film
     
     
    Previous editions:
    Jurassic Park
     
     
    Introduction
     
    Four years after Jurassic Park, Steven Spielberg returned to the world of dinosaurs. The Lost World: Jurassic Park finds us not in another adventure-filled theme park, however, but on another island completely: Isla Sorna, a second InGen facility dubbed Site B. This island is where the real dinosaur research happened. Here, the animals were cloned and brought up, before being moved to Isla Nublar for park display. After a hurricane strikes Isla Sorna, the island is abandoned, leaving the animals to survive on their own. They flourish, and it creates what is known as a Lost World: a habitat stuck in prehistoric time, unlike any ecosystem anywhere in the world.
     
    When the movie opens, the abandoned island is accidentally discovered by a British family on holiday. But when the young daughter encounters a group of small dinosaurs, she is attacked and subsequently hospitalized. Afraid of what this could mean for the animals living on the island, JOHN HAMMOND (Richard Attenborough), businessman turned environmentalist on his deathbed, tries to persuade IAN MALCOLM (Jeff Goldblum) to join an expedition to document the habitat to gather support for preservation. Malcolm, still shaken from his experience on Isla Nublar, rejects Hammond’s offer, but as it turns out, Hammond has already persuaded Malcolm’s girlfriend SARAH HARDING (Julianne Moore) to join the expedition. A strong and independent woman, Sarah jumped at the chance to study the extinct animals in the wild and has already departed to the island. So starts a rescue mission that will have to venture deep into dinosaur territory.
     
    But there’s more trouble on the horizon. In an effort to recoup the losses InGen has suffered after the park incident and the hurricane, PETER LUDLOW (Arliss Howard), the new director of InGen and nephew of John Hammond, has decided to put in motion a plan to gather a bunch of animals off the island to display them in an amphitheater in San Diego. As if trying to navigate an island inhabited with dangerous prehistoric animals isn’t enough, Malcolm and his group now find themselves at odds with Ludlow’s team as well…
     
    The sequel’s setting is much more primal and dangerous than that of its predecessor and harkens back to jungle adventure films of old. Similarly, where Jurassic Park felt like a Greatest Hits collection of Williams’ other works, The Lost World sees the composer venture into unique territory. This score is not anchored around a big, ballsy theme. You may remember the Lost World theme from the film, but in more than one occasion it replaced other original music written for the scene. Not counting the end credits, the theme only appears twice in the original score.  Instead, much of The Lost World is textural, with percussion being the driving force and a single four-note motif representing the island and its inhabitants making numerous appearances.
     
    By the time The Lost World was scored, there was still some work to be done on the film’s picture editing. With Spielberg already off to work on Amistad, the score was recorded to the picture as it was at the time and then adapted in the editing bay to match a later cut. This meant The Lost World ended up with an unusual amount of music edits for a Spielberg film. Several scenes were edited after the scoring and because of the cue titles, we know of at least one scene that was scored and then deleted entirely. The dark tone of the film set by Williams’ music was also alleviated by tracking in the concert suite of the more adventurious Lost World theme at certain points in the film.
     
    The original album assembly for The Lost World: Jurassic Park tried to recreate the kind of sequencing that worked so well for the original film’s album. Unfortunately, devoid of the individual melodies that made Jurassic Park such an interesting listen, the original Lost World album has a hard time matching its predecessor. As Williams develops the score’s sound over its running time, it’s important to hear certain moments before others. The album’s sequencing is all over the place and the score’s original development is lost. It also features one of the most infamously frustrating edits within a track of Williams’ entire discography.
     
    Thanks to La La Land Records, we are now able to hear The Lost World: Jurassic Park in its entirety and in its proper order. The score’s designed progression has been restored, and previously unreleased and unused music has been unearthed. This release deserves all the praise it can get, because The Lost World, as it turns out, is not only a powerhouse action score with a unique sound for Williams, but also a far better work than the film and the original album made it seem.
     
    As I did with Jurassic Park, I’ll be looking at the score restored to picture to see how it works in the film. I will be less analytical in a lot of my descriptions this time, because music theory isn’t my forte and there’s already an excellent analysis on these boards that you can read here. 
     
    Expect to see a lot more edits and and unused music in this one compared to Jurassic Park. When all is said and done, Williams' version of The Lost World is quite different from the final film.
     
    But of course we start at the beginning.
     
     

     
    1. Universal Logo/The Island’s Voice **
    Universal Logo
    1M1 The Island's Voice
    After Jerry Goldsmith’s Universal fanfare announces the start of the film, we are plunged into darkness. The sounds of wind and the deep rumble of the sea (or is it the sound of primordial forces awakening?) takes us into the film, already setting a darker and more ominous tone than the birds chirping over the company logo in the original.
     
    Right away the film’s primary motif is introduced. Taking a cue from the trak's title, we’ll refer to it as the island's voice. It represents danger throughout the score. Already, the first track features some micro-editing in the film. These edits probably occurred because of picture edits made after the score was recorded, so restoration may not be entirely accurate and the music’s placement may not be as intended either. You’ll notice the music ends slightly earlier here than it does in the final scene. In the film, there is a small music loop during the scene’s final shot.
  13. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Incanus in REMIXED & RESTORED: Jurassic Park   
    19. Life Finds a Way *
    10m3 Eggs in the Forest
    Another very brief pause in the score allows us to hear the bickering of Lex and Tim, before the score returns to signal Grant’s worrying discovery: the dinosaurs are breeding. The angelic choir heard in Hatching Baby Raptor returns to underscore the miracle of birth. The cue's final chord was replaced by a more ominous one in the film, tracked in from another cue.
     
    Up next: the shortest cue from the film as we move to disc 2 of the La-La Land set.
  14. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Incanus in REMIXED & RESTORED: Jurassic Park   
    20. System Ready *
    11m1 System Light On
    Another brief thriller cue signals the start of the third act, as Hammond orders everyone into the emergency bunker. The cue plays without edits, but the short synthesizer line heard at 00:38 is dropped from the film.
     
    Up next: ten minutes of continuous scoring, featuring some of the score's most interesting dropped material!
  15. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Incanus in REMIXED & RESTORED: Jurassic Park   
    21. To the Maintenance Shed **/High-Wire Stunts */Hungry Raptor *
    11m2 Preparing to Meet the Monster
    11m2-12m1 High Wire Stunts
    12m2 Hungry Raptor
    To signal the transition into the a new mission for the heroes, Williams plays a militaristic version of the adventure theme, as Muldoon and Ellie gather their gear to venture outside. Once they are out in the open, the score returns to the familiar texture of the ominous jungle. The carnivore motif gets a big rendition as the broken raptor fence is revealed. Jungle drums up the tension as Ellie makes herself ready to storm the power shed. Another frantic action cue underscores her dash before the music becomes more subdued as she makes her way inside. A final chord takes us to Grant and the kids arriving at the perimeter fence. This first cue plays pretty much in its entirety, but making the video required some editing to get everything to line up correctly. The first chord fades in slightly later in the film, with the music not starting until we cut to Ellie on the stairs. There’s also a minor edit somewhere in the first part of the track. You’ll notice the video go black for a moment at my best guess at where footage was cut from the film. The cue then continues exactly as it does on CD, except that the gap left for Muldoon’s “Because we’re being hunted” is longer in the film. I have edited the music accordingly, to leave the flow of this scene intact.
     
    The next cue is the tense build-up of High Wire Stunts, which underscores Grant and the kids’ climb into the perimeter, intercut with Ellie switching on the power. The first minute of the cue is unused in the film, with the music not coming in until after the distant T-Rex roar. In the film, a short clip from the start of The T-Rex Chase is used to kick off the cue. High Wire Stunts was supposed to overlap with the end of Preparing to Meet the Monster, starting right as we cut to the perimiter fence. The pause for Grant's fake electrocution was shortened for album purposes. Another big statement of the carnivore motif is cut from the film here, originally overlapping with the roar heard from off-screen. As Lex and Tim react to the sound, the music turns more urgent and this is where the film first picks up the track. When playing this scene with music, the music brings an urgency to the scene right from the start. In the final film, the T-Rex roar is what triggers the urgency in the characters, so the scene works very well without music at the start. The silence actually elevates the scene more than the tense music, lending room to some levity with Grant and the kids and saving the danger for after the T-Rex kicks the kids into gear.
     
    The cue continues as is, until a clumsy music edit in the film removes the short drumroll that is heard as Grant turns to the fence to go up and get Tim. The final two chords of the track were also dropped to make way for Ellie’s dialogue and a brief silence before a hungry raptor comes crashing through the pipes…
     
    And here we find the most notable passage of dropped music in Hungry Raptor, as Ellie is ambushed by a vicious velociraptor. Iterations of the carnivore motif follow in rapid succession over a frantic action motif accompanied by synthesizer percussion as Ellie hauls ass out of the maintenance shed. Stylistically, it’s slightly different from the other action music in the film. If it wasn’t for The Making of Jurassic Park using this piece for the end credits, we might not have known a piece like this was written for the film until the release of the 20th Anniversary Edition soundtrack in 2013!
     
    In the film, this sequence was tracked with various pieces of the film’s finale. For a piece that was created by editing bits together, it actually works quite well.
     
    The dropped piece is longer than the chase in the film, so we can assume something was cut. If we start the cue right when the raptor appears next to Ellie - which would have it start exactly where the unused conclusion of High-Wire Stunts ends - the music lines up pretty well until the raptor jumps onto the metal floor. I assume an edit was made here. To pick up the film image again, I have synced the latter half of the cue with its start in the film and worked backwards from there.
     
    After Ellie's mad dash from the maintenance shed, the written score returns in the film as Muldoon hunts the escaped raptors. Tense jungle textures with the carnivore motif overlaid accompany him getting into position. The final part of the cue, starting with the raptor’s head appearing next to Muldoon is dropped in favor of music from the end of The Raptor Attack and a mix favoring the sound design. As written, Williams uses a loud and aggressive rendition of the carnivore motif to underscore the attack on Muldoon.
     
    This concludes ten minutes of continuous score, from which a large chunk went unused. But it doesn't end here. Up next is another unique bit of scoring that was almost entirely dropped from the film...
  16. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Incanus in REMIXED & RESTORED: Jurassic Park   
    22. The Raptor Attack *
    12m3-13m1 Into the Kitchen
    The climax of the film kicks off with the tense kitchen sequence. For this sequence, the music is at its most primal and atonal. Using strings, deep brass and choir, Williams captures the threat of the prehistoric predators stalking the children.
     
    In the film, the music doesn’t start until the raptors open the kitchen door, but by then we’re over a minute into the track. As the door opens and the children cower behind the stainless steel counters, we hear the only piece of music from this track that is actually in the film in what we can assume is its proper place. When the raptors start barking, the film mix replaces Williams’ written score with pieces of To the Maintenance Shed, right up until Tim hides near the spoon rack. If we line up the used music for the raptors’ entry and let the music play, the ending syncs up perfectly. Working backwards, we find the music originally started right as Lex spots the shadow of a raptor behind the glass wall over Tim’s shoulder.
     
    It’s interesting to note that Spielberg makes special mention of Williams’ raptor music in his liner notes, yet drops this cue almost entirely in favor of more traditional scoring.
  17. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Incanus in REMIXED & RESTORED: Jurassic Park   
    23. T-Rex Rescue & Finale *
    13m2 March Past the Kitchen Utensils
    13m3-14m1 T-Rex to the Rescue
    As the raptors react to the spoon dropping off the rack where Tim is hiding, the film's musical climax kicks into gear. The music for the raptor reacting to Lex’s reflection is slightly different in the film, probably tracked or looped from music nearby, but leaving the CD track intact makes the music line up perfectly with what follows. Williams goes into full urgent action mode for the childrens’ escape from the kitchen and the ensuing siege of the control room. A celebratory rendition of the adventure theme hails the return of power and control to the park.
     
    As Grant phones Hammond, there is a brief pause in the CD track. The music starts earlier in the film. I have edited the music to let the scene play as is. All that is removed is a few seconds of silence.
     
    When the raptor crashes through the ceiling underneath Lex, there’s some very minor music editing going on in the film. I assume the visual effect shot of her fall was slightly trimmed at the last second (these things happen). I have left a blank screen where I assume the film edits took place and retained the flow of the music, although the music edit actually happens somewhere in the middle of the shot.
     
    The action music continues for the scene in the visitors’ center’s main hall, until Grant, Ellie and the kids are cornered. Just as the first raptor is about to pounce, the T-Rex’s head swoops in and saves the day! For this moment, Williams originally employed the carnivore motif in full force. The cue as written is slightly longer than the scene in the film. I assume something was trimmed off the start of one of the effect shots. You’ll notice the group goes from stationary to in motion within the span of a cut, so I’m guessing that’s where the edit was made. Again, I’ve left the screen blank to maintain the flow of the music.
     
    A final flurry of low strings scores the group’s dash down the stairs before the track culminates in a giant fanfare finale, coinciding with the T-Rex’s final bellowing roar.
     
    As far as unused music in Jurassic Park, this is it. But there is one more track left to go...
  18. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Incanus in REMIXED & RESTORED: Jurassic Park   
    24. Welcome to Jurassic Park (film version) **
    14m2 End Credits
    As everyone makes their way to the helicopter, Hammond looks out over his creation one last time. Originally unscored, this scene featured music tracked in from Petticoat Lane in the film. The final cue Williams wrote for the film starts as we cut inside.
     
    The La La Land set features two versions of the end credits track, but the only difference I could find was a teeny tiny microedit before the adventure theme starts halfway through the end credits in the album version. For this video, I have used the track listed as the film version.
     
    A quiet version of the main theme plays on the piano as the survivors fly away, each lost in their own thoughts. As Grant turns to look out the window and sees a flock of birds flying along with the helicopter, the rest of the orchestra joins in and we’re back to admiring the beauty of nature one last time.
     
    In the film, there is a music edit when we cut to the birds for the second time. There is either missing footage here, or the cue was started later than it was supposed to, to make room for the music tracked under Hammond’s quiet farewell. In that case, the piano would come in right as Grant takes hold of Hammond and pulls him away towards the helicopter. This sort of works, but then the first orchestral accompaniment no longer syncs up with Grant spotting the birds for the first time, so I’m assuming the music starts in the right place in the film and something was simply excised from this scene at the last second.
     
    As the helicopter heads towards the setting sun the music builds to an orchestral crescendo as we FADE OUT and leave Jurassic Park behind us. Over the end credits, we revisit the main theme, the adventure theme, the main theme again and finally the carnivore motif as we close on the AMBLIN logo and fade out for the last time.
     
     
    That brings us to the end of Jurassic Park. I hope you've enjoyed this project and I'd love to hear your thoughts. What did you think about the unused music put back in place?
     
    Meanwhile, stay tuned for the REMIXED & RESTORED version of The Lost World: Jurassic Park, which will feature a lot more unused music and blank screens as the film appears to have been heavily re-edited after Williams scored it. There's some great music left on the cutting room floor that works wonders when put to images. Stay tuned!
  19. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Will in STAR WARS general thread   
    One of The Force Awakens' strengths was certainly its characters and the possible dynamics it sets up. I walked out of the cinema eagerly anticipating how their story would continue. I haven't felt that way about characters in a film franchise in a long time.
  20. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from scallenger in REMIXED & RESTORED: Jurassic Park   
    21. To the Maintenance Shed **/High-Wire Stunts */Hungry Raptor *
    11m2 Preparing to Meet the Monster
    11m2-12m1 High Wire Stunts
    12m2 Hungry Raptor
    To signal the transition into the a new mission for the heroes, Williams plays a militaristic version of the adventure theme, as Muldoon and Ellie gather their gear to venture outside. Once they are out in the open, the score returns to the familiar texture of the ominous jungle. The carnivore motif gets a big rendition as the broken raptor fence is revealed. Jungle drums up the tension as Ellie makes herself ready to storm the power shed. Another frantic action cue underscores her dash before the music becomes more subdued as she makes her way inside. A final chord takes us to Grant and the kids arriving at the perimeter fence. This first cue plays pretty much in its entirety, but making the video required some editing to get everything to line up correctly. The first chord fades in slightly later in the film, with the music not starting until we cut to Ellie on the stairs. There’s also a minor edit somewhere in the first part of the track. You’ll notice the video go black for a moment at my best guess at where footage was cut from the film. The cue then continues exactly as it does on CD, except that the gap left for Muldoon’s “Because we’re being hunted” is longer in the film. I have edited the music accordingly, to leave the flow of this scene intact.
     
    The next cue is the tense build-up of High Wire Stunts, which underscores Grant and the kids’ climb into the perimeter, intercut with Ellie switching on the power. The first minute of the cue is unused in the film, with the music not coming in until after the distant T-Rex roar. In the film, a short clip from the start of The T-Rex Chase is used to kick off the cue. High Wire Stunts was supposed to overlap with the end of Preparing to Meet the Monster, starting right as we cut to the perimiter fence. The pause for Grant's fake electrocution was shortened for album purposes. Another big statement of the carnivore motif is cut from the film here, originally overlapping with the roar heard from off-screen. As Lex and Tim react to the sound, the music turns more urgent and this is where the film first picks up the track. When playing this scene with music, the music brings an urgency to the scene right from the start. In the final film, the T-Rex roar is what triggers the urgency in the characters, so the scene works very well without music at the start. The silence actually elevates the scene more than the tense music, lending room to some levity with Grant and the kids and saving the danger for after the T-Rex kicks the kids into gear.
     
    The cue continues as is, until a clumsy music edit in the film removes the short drumroll that is heard as Grant turns to the fence to go up and get Tim. The final two chords of the track were also dropped to make way for Ellie’s dialogue and a brief silence before a hungry raptor comes crashing through the pipes…
     
    And here we find the most notable passage of dropped music in Hungry Raptor, as Ellie is ambushed by a vicious velociraptor. Iterations of the carnivore motif follow in rapid succession over a frantic action motif accompanied by synthesizer percussion as Ellie hauls ass out of the maintenance shed. Stylistically, it’s slightly different from the other action music in the film. If it wasn’t for The Making of Jurassic Park using this piece for the end credits, we might not have known a piece like this was written for the film until the release of the 20th Anniversary Edition soundtrack in 2013!
     
    In the film, this sequence was tracked with various pieces of the film’s finale. For a piece that was created by editing bits together, it actually works quite well.
     
    The dropped piece is longer than the chase in the film, so we can assume something was cut. If we start the cue right when the raptor appears next to Ellie - which would have it start exactly where the unused conclusion of High-Wire Stunts ends - the music lines up pretty well until the raptor jumps onto the metal floor. I assume an edit was made here. To pick up the film image again, I have synced the latter half of the cue with its start in the film and worked backwards from there.
     
    After Ellie's mad dash from the maintenance shed, the written score returns in the film as Muldoon hunts the escaped raptors. Tense jungle textures with the carnivore motif overlaid accompany him getting into position. The final part of the cue, starting with the raptor’s head appearing next to Muldoon is dropped in favor of music from the end of The Raptor Attack and a mix favoring the sound design. As written, Williams uses a loud and aggressive rendition of the carnivore motif to underscore the attack on Muldoon.
     
    This concludes ten minutes of continuous score, from which a large chunk went unused. But it doesn't end here. Up next is another unique bit of scoring that was almost entirely dropped from the film...
  21. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Naïve Old Fart in STAR WARS general thread   
    Don't forget about the money.
  22. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Disco Stu in REMIXED & RESTORED: Jurassic Park   
    Yes. This whole project is basically a warmup for The Lost World.
     
    The Hunt is a nightmare to restore. It's entirely unused, there are very few points in the music that could be used as sync points and the whole sequence was likely heavily re-edited late in the game. I'm currently working on three different versions of the The Hunt video and all of them are guesses. And that's probably the best I can do, unless a workprint miraculously leaks somewhere.
  23. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Disco Stu in REMIXED & RESTORED: Jurassic Park   
    Ah, right. I got confused by the word "passages". I thought you meant skipping passages of music. Never mind.
     
    So yeah, I'll be doing that every time the music is longer than the film. You'll see it a few more times in upcoming Jurassic Park videos.
     
    Then you'll be seeing a lot of that when we get to The Lost World...
  24. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from Bilbo in STAR WARS general thread   
    They're going to re-release the Star Wars saga. On a shelf.
     
    SRP: $800
     
    In stores soon!
  25. Like
    Mr. Breathmask got a reaction from mstrox in STAR WARS general thread   
    They're going to re-release the Star Wars saga. On a shelf.
     
    SRP: $800
     
    In stores soon!
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