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I'm doing my part...


Eric_JWFAN
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Tomorrow I start a new teaching position at a private school K-8. I will teach music appreciation, music theory, music history etc. I don't have much time to spend on the individual periods of music, but my 20th century curriculum will include five composers:

Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Copland, Gershwin, and John Williams. :)

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very nice.

unless you're going to bash him, 8O  

just kidding :)

Thanks! And no, I never have and never will bash the maestro JW.

I chose those specific composers because they are the 20th century composers I believe people will still be listening to 50 years from now. And I wanted to play music accessible to children. As important as Arnold Schoenberg is, his music (outside of his early stuff) is not very accessible for kids.

By the way, what's your prediction for the Southern Cal game?

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give me until game week to make a decision on that, my head says USC, but my heart says otherwise.

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Lucky I wish i was able to learn about Williams during my elementary years. The only thing I learned from my music teacher was that I am the only one in the whole school that knows at least two pieces from Beethoven.

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I'm working on that one...

I'll be teaching music at a high school part-time this year as well, and will definitely include quite a bit of Williams in the coursework, especially if we do a film music-oriented lecture at some point.

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I chose those specific composers because they are the 20th century composers I believe people will still be listening to 50 years from now. And I wanted to play music accessible to children.  As important as Arnold Schoenberg is, his music (outside of his early stuff) is not very accessible for kids.  

Don't underestimate them, Eric. I once saw a program where at one point they showed that young children (learning the piano) have less problems with dissonance than grownups. In fact, they loved it! We automatically overprotect our children from lots of interesting music. Music that should be a part of their education. Today people are so alienated from classic or modern music (or non-radio music) that they do not longer know how to respond to it.

Alex

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I chose those specific composers because they are the 20th century composers I believe people will still be listening to 50 years from now. And I wanted to play music accessible to children.  As important as Arnold Schoenberg is, his music (outside of his early stuff) is not very accessible for kids.  

Don't underestimate them, Eric. I once saw a program where at one point they showed that young children (learning the piano) have less problems with dissonance than grownups. In fact, they loved it! We automatically overprotect our children from lots of interesting music. Music that should be a part of their education. Today people are so alienated from classic or modern music (or non-radio music) that they do not longer know how to respond to it.

Alex

I will definitely tell the kids about various experimental music techniques of the 20th century, but my focus will be more traditional symphonic composers. I need to save some time for jazz and rock too. The Beatles will get a whole day.

What about Barber?

Yes, and there's Shostakovich, Britten, Bartok, Sibelius, Walton, Vaughan Williams, Khachaturian, Webern, Ligeti, Penderecki, Stockhausen...

simply don't have time to include them all. Wish I could though...

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It's a shame you have to leave out Bartok. I personally feel he's the epitome of twentieth century music, incorporating both classical aestheticism and mathematical rigidity (and folk music etc etc)...

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A couple of years ago I taught a college freshman music theory course. During the block on Leitmotif I spent a day on the last 6 minutes of The Battle of Yavin. We examined the main themes, then listened to the music to see how they were presented. Then we watched the last 5 minutes of the battle on DVD on a projector! Very nice!

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Finally! A music teacher who has the guts to say "I like John Williams, and thats okay." Unlike my music teacher who is convinced that Williams is an unoriginal hack and doesn't deserve to be taught in schools. Bravo!

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Tomorrow I start a new teaching position at a private school K-8. I will teach music appreciation, music theory, music history etc. I don't have much time to spend on the individual periods of music, but my 20th century curriculum will include five composers:

Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Copland, Gershwin, and John Williams. ;)

i approve of most of those. its sad you couldnt include hindemith, schoenberg or bartok. these are all very influential composers, perhaps more influential than prokofiev or gershwin. with schoenberg, btw, you could have played verklarte nacht. that's accessible:).

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Tomorrow I start a new teaching position at a private school K-8. I will teach music appreciation, music theory, music history etc. I don't have much time to spend on the individual periods of music, but my 20th century curriculum will include five composers:

Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Copland, Gershwin, and John Williams. :)

i approve of most of those. its sad you couldnt include hindemith, schoenberg or bartok. these are all very influential composers, perhaps more influential than prokofiev or gershwin. with schoenberg, btw, you could have played verklarte nacht. that's accessible:).

Trust me, I'd take Bartok's worst piece over Gershwin's best in a heart beat, but I disagree on Hindemith being more influential. Gershwin may not have influenced the classical school as much as Hindemith, but don't forget his enormous impact on American song writing and what we now know as "Broadway".

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It'll be interesting to see the kids' reactions when they listen to music in your class.

"Classical stuff...more orchestra...woodwinds...some Russian guy...more orche--HEY! Isn't that Star Wars!?"

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It'll be interesting to see the kids' reactions when they listen to music in your class.

"Classical stuff...more orchestra...woodwinds...some Russian guy...more orche--HEY!  Isn't that Star Wars!?"

No its Jaws!

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