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Empire of the Sun- Exultate Justi Lyrics


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Hey Everybody. I think I thought of something hard for you all to find. Where can I find the lyrics to Exultate Justi by John Williams or does anybody know the lyrics to Exultate Justi by John Williams. Thank You. By the how many of you have the soundtrack? I will be getting it soon.

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Laudamus te.

Laudamus.

Laudamus te.

Laudamus.

Exsultate justi in Domino.

Exsultate in Domino.

Exsultate justi in Domino.

Rectos decet ladatio.

Alleluia, Alleluia

Alleluia, Alleluia

Salvator Dominus Salvator mundi.

Quitollis Peccata mundi.

Salvator Dominus Salvator mundi.

Quitollis Peccata mundi.

Alleluia, Alleluia

Alleluia, Alleluia

Exsultate justi in Domino.

Rectos decet ladatio.

Laudamus te.

Laudamus.

Laudamus te.

Cantate ei.

Canticum novum.

Cantate ei.

Canticum novum.

Laudamus te.

Laudamus.

Laudamus te.

Exsultate justi in Domino.

Exsultate in Domino.

Exsultate juste in Domino.

Rectos Decet ladatio.

Alleluia, Alleluia

Alleluia, Alleluia

Cantate ei.

Cantate Canticum.

Exsultate justi in Domino.

Rectos De Cetladatio.

Exsultate justi in Domino.

Exsultate in Domino.

Just typed it in off the sheet music. Some parts have multiple voices singing different lines...but all the lyrics are there.

-JCM

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I think they are in my liner notes, not sure

Where are your liner notes?

with my cd, but JCM posted them for you.

besides my liner notes don't have them I have them somewhere else.

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I've always thought that the adult chorus version found on the Spielberg/Williams Collaboration CD works better for once than the kid's chorus, found on the OS. Dunno why. Perhaps it's got nothing to do with the chorus, the BPO is just tons better.

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Few corrections to the text provided by JCM:

Laudamus te,

Laudamus

Laudamus te,

Laudamus

Exsultate Justi in Domino

Exsultate in Domino

Exsultate Justi in Domino

Rectos decet collaudatio

Alleluia

Alleluia

Salvator Dominus, Salvator mundi

Qui tollis peccata mundi

Salvator Dominus, Salvator mundi

Qui tollis peccata mundi

Alleluia

Alleluia

Exsultate Justi in Domino

Rectos decet collaudatio

Laudamus te

Laudamus

Laudamus te

Laudamus

Cantate ei canticum novum

Bene psallite ei in vociferatione. (this is the line that is missing from the most lyrics reported but it can be heard e.g. in the Spielberg/Williams collaboration album version of the piece. It is more difficult to hear what the OST version has).

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He used Sanskrit for Duel of the Fates. Most of the time, though, he uses a wordless choir.

I'm not very sure about it. In a nutshell:

with lyrics:

Monsignor -----> LATIN

Return of the Jedi -----> FICTIONAL LANGUAGE AND ENGLISH

America, the Dream Goes On ------> ENGLISH

Temple of Doom ------> SANSKRIT

Empire of the Sun ------> LATIN

Home Alone (1&2) -----> ENGLISH

Schindler's List ------> HEBREW

Sleepers ------> LATIN

Rosewood ------> ENGLISH

Amistad ------> MENDE

The Phantom Menace (& AOTC) ------> SANSKRIT

Harry Potter (1 & 3) ------> ENGLISH

Call of the Champions -----> LATIN

Revenge of the Sith -----> SANSKRIT

not counting the musicals, which are all in English

wordless:

Close Encounters

Superman

Raiders of the Lost Ark

Return of the Jedi

Empire of the Sun

Hook

Jurassic Park

Amistad

Saving Private Ryan

A.I.

Harry Potter (1, 2 & 3)

Call of the Champions

Revenge of the Sith

War of the Worlds

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John- who much prefers wordless choir

I don't. It can be used well (and Williams often does it that way), but it usually still has a much higher cheesiness potential than choir with lyrics.

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He used Sanskrit for Duel of the Fates. Most of the time, though, he uses a wordless choir.

I'm not very sure about it. In a nutshell:

with lyrics:

Monsignor -----> LATIN

America, the Dream Goes On ------> ENGLISH

Temple of Doom ------> SANSKRIT

Empire of the Sun ------> LATIN

Home Alone (1&2) -----> ENGLISH

Schindler's List ------> HEBREW

Sleepers ------> LATIN?

Rosewood ------> ENGLISH

Amistad ------> MENDE

Harry Potter (1 & 3) ------> ENGLISH

The Phantom Menace (& AOTC) ------> SANSKRIT

Revenge of the Sith -----> SANSKRIT

not counting the musicals, which are all in English

wordless:

Close Encounters

Superman

Raiders of the Lost Ark

Return of the Jedi

Empire of the Sun

Jurassic Park

Saving Private Ryan

A.I.

Harry Potter (1, 2 & 3)

Call of the Champions

Revenge of the Sith

War of the Worlds

Wow, John Williams speaks multiple languages!!! :lol:

Couple of questions. Did John Williams write a choral piece for Sleepers? If so, which track is it? Also, I didn't know the lyrics of Amistad represented any language. Mende . . . is that some African language? If so, do you know what they're saying?

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The poem was not originally written in Mende, since its author, Bernard Dadie, does not speak that language. He writes in French. Williams obviously read a translated copy of West African Verse and I recall he asked a woman to translate that poem into Mende.

The excerpt Williams put into music goes like this:

"Dry your tears, Afrika!

Your children come back to you

We have come home"

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Miguel will have the answer to that. Although according to the liner notes, he did take it from a compilation of West African verse appropiately called... West African Verse. As far as my 2-minute research goes, that book was not published under any other language. The poem probably has, though.

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wordless:

Call of the Champions

Call of the Champions I believe also has latin lyrics. Something like 'Citius, Altius, Fortius' which if my almost completely forgotten knowledge of latin serves me well means something like Faster, Higher, Stronger.

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wordless:

Call of the Champions

Call of the Champions I believe also has latin lyrics. Something like 'Citius, Altius, Fortius' which if my almost completely forgotten knowledge of latin serves me well means something like Faster, Higher, Stronger.

Its the motto of the olympic games/spirit.

wordless:

Return of the Jedi

Huttese, ewokesse and english.

Unless we credit Williams' son for them...

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I edited the list with your corrections.

The choral track from "Sleepers" is "Saying the Rosary", one of my favorites. :unsure:

wordless:

Call of the Champions

Call of the Champions I believe also has latin lyrics. Something like 'Citius, Altius, Fortius' which if my almost completely forgotten knowledge of latin serves me well means something like Faster, Higher, Stronger.

Yeah, true! And he added "Clarius" to it, in the last rendition of the motto.

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The choral track from "Sleepers" is "Saying the Rosary", one of my favorites. :lol:

If anyone is interested, the lyrics heard in the Saying the Rosary cue in Sleepers are taken from the traditional Latin mass when the priest distributes holy communion:

animam tuam in vitam aeternam

corpus domini nostri Iesu Christi (custodiat)

This translates as "May the body of our Lord Jesus Christ watch over your soul unto eternal life." The choir does not sing the word 'custodiat', as far as I can make out. I guess Williams does not care much for iussive subjunctives, and who can blame him? As for the Gloria from Monsignor, the lyrics are the first line of the Gloria (no shit!), also from the Latin mass:

gloria in excelsis deo

et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis.

This translates as "Glory to God in the highest and on earth peace to men of good will."

I hope this does not count as religious discussion. Please don't ban me, Mark! I couldn't live with the shame! ;)

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Miguel will have the answer to that. Although according to the liner notes, he did take it from a compilation of West African verse appropiately called... West African Verse. As far as my 2-minute research goes, that book was not published under any other language. The poem probably has, though.

Williams probably knows some french, since he had to go to Paris while working in Images.

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Thank you for the info on The Saying the Rosary Omen II! I have always wondered about the lyrics on that track. I could hear pieces of what the choir is singing. The name of the track and the scene of course point to a Catholic mass but I never bothered to find out what exactly the text was. ;)

I guess Williams really did not have in mind to use the complete lyrics for the track. In film music I have noticed that many composers do not utilize lyrics as a whole in their compositions but only parts that fit the music.

E.g. Williams chose Sanskrit for Episode I because of the qualities of the vowels in that language and used mainly words 'dreaded fight' from the section of 'Battle of the Trees' he had had translated.

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Did anyone ever notice that the OST version of Exsultate Justi has a part (musically speaking) in the middle of the piece that is not heard on the Spielberg/Williams collaboration arrangement?

This gorgeous part starts at 2:35 and ends 3:02.

Why Williams did not incorporate it in his re-arrangement is quite beyond me. Does anyone know?

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Did anyone ever notice that the OST version of Exsultate Justi has a part (musically speaking) in the middle of the piece that is not heard on the Spielberg/Williams collaboration arrangement?

This gorgeous part starts at 2:35 and ends 3:02.

Why Williams did not incorporate it in his re-arrangement is quite beyond me. Does anyone know?

Yeah, I did notice it.

But since I heard the Spielberg/Williams arrangement first (and fell in love with that), I didn't really like the "new" additional section from the OS version. I don't know . . . it somehow seems redundant, IMO.

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In film music I have noticed that many composers do not utilize lyrics as a whole in their compositions but only parts that fit the music.

A very astute observation, Incanus. A while ago I tried to work out what the choir was singing in the Charging Fort Wagner cue in James Horner's Glory. However, he seems to have lifted random phrases from the requiem mass in no particular order, but I guess film composers are, quite rightly, more concerned with musical effect than grammar and syntax!

B)

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The female solo at the beginning of "Dry Your Tears, Afrika" was also wordless.

That's not choral, but the first time "Dry Your Tears, Afrika" is heard in the film is in boca chiusa, so I'll add it to the list. :)

The female solos in Munich also didn't use any words/language.

Tim

Lisbeth Scott actually says somethng in those cues, some words invented by herself (according to the making-of).

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I've always thought that the adult chorus version found on the Spielberg/Williams Collaboration CD works better for once than the kid's chorus, found on the OS. Dunno why. Perhaps it's got nothing to do with the chorus, the BPO is just tons better.

You've got it backward. The OST uses women, as Williams does throughout the score other than for the Welsh hymn. But on the Boston Pops "Exsultate Justi" was done with mixed men/women (Tanglewood) plus a boys choir. Both groups also did it live on the 1990 Christmas special.

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In film music I have noticed that many composers do not utilize lyrics as a whole in their compositions but only parts that fit the music.

A very astute observation, Incanus. A while ago I tried to work out what the choir was singing in the Charging Fort Wagner cue in James Horner's Glory. However, he seems to have lifted random phrases from the requiem mass in no particular order, but I guess film composers are, quite rightly, more concerned with musical effect than grammar and syntax!

B)

Well, theoretically, a good choral composer should try to find a way to fit both lyrics and music so that the entonation of the words and the sentence matches the melodic line. In practice, there have been some great composers throughout history who didn't care about the lyrics.

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I've always thought that the adult chorus version found on the Spielberg/Williams Collaboration CD works better for once than the kid's chorus, found on the OS. Dunno why. Perhaps it's got nothing to do with the chorus, the BPO is just tons better.

You've got it backward. The OST uses women, as Williams does throughout the score other than for the Welsh hymn. But on the Boston Pops "Exsultate Justi" was done with mixed men/women (Tanglewood) plus a boys choir. Both groups also did it live on the 1990 Christmas special.

The OST sounds like women + children to me. The actual sheet music is written for 4 voices (and several divisi), split in 2 staves, both in G-clef. 2nd one must belong to the children, methinks.

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The female solos in Munich also didn't use any words/language.

Tim

Lisbeth Scott actually says somethng in those cues, some words invented by herself (according to the making-of).

I never saw the "making of", I'm going by what Williams said in an interview, where he stating Ms. Scott simply made variation sounds on vowels, and not saying any real words in a specific language. But we still seem to be on the same page.

Tim

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The choral track from "Sleepers" is "Saying the Rosary", one of my favorites. :beerchug:

If anyone is interested, the lyrics heard in the Saying the Rosary cue in Sleepers are taken from the traditional Latin mass when the priest distributes holy communion:

animam tuam in vitam aeternam

corpus domini nostri Iesu Christi (custodiat)

This translates as "May the body of our Lord Jesus Christ watch over your soul unto eternal life." The choir does not sing the word 'custodiat', as far as I can make out. I guess Williams does not care much for iussive subjunctives, and who can blame him? As for the Gloria from Monsignor, the lyrics are the first line of the Gloria (no shit!), also from the Latin mass:

gloria in excelsis deo

et in terra pax hominibus bonae voluntatis.

This translates as "Glory to God in the highest and on earth peace to men of good will."

I hope this does not count as religious discussion. Please don't ban me, Mark! I couldn't live with the shame! :)

Dammit! That's it! We need to ban John Williams lyrics themselves from JWFAN! :flameblob: (<--- This means I am kidding, for those who didn't know.)

BTW, what is an iussive subjunctive? Never heard of the term.

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I've always thought that the adult chorus version found on the Spielberg/Williams Collaboration CD works better for once than the kid's chorus, found on the OS. Dunno why. Perhaps it's got nothing to do with the chorus, the BPO is just tons better.

You've got it backward. The OST uses women, as Williams does throughout the score other than for the Welsh hymn. But on the Boston Pops "Exsultate Justi" was done with mixed men/women (Tanglewood) plus a boys choir. Both groups also did it live on the 1990 Christmas special.

The OST sounds like women + children to me. The actual sheet music is written for 4 voices (and several divisi), split in 2 staves, both in G-clef. 2nd one must belong to the children, methinks.

On the OS, you're right -- there might be kids + women. But on the Spielberg/Williams collaboration CD, I don't detect any kid's chorus. Which part, exactly, are you referring to?

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Dammit! That's it! We need to ban John Williams lyrics themselves from JWFAN! :) (<--- This means I am kidding, for those who didn't know.)

They are obviously not John Williams text but adaptations from sacred Religious texts.

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I've always thought that the adult chorus version found on the Spielberg/Williams Collaboration CD works better for once than the kid's chorus, found on the OS. Dunno why. Perhaps it's got nothing to do with the chorus, the BPO is just tons better.

You've got it backward. The OST uses women, as Williams does throughout the score other than for the Welsh hymn. But on the Boston Pops "Exsultate Justi" was done with mixed men/women (Tanglewood) plus a boys choir. Both groups also did it live on the 1990 Christmas special.

The OST sounds like women + children to me. The actual sheet music is written for 4 voices (and several divisi), split in 2 staves, both in G-clef. 2nd one must belong to the children, methinks.

On the OS, you're right -- there might be kids + women. But on the Spielberg/Williams collaboration CD, I don't detect any kid's chorus. Which part, exactly, are you referring to?

I think they sing together all the time in the OST version. No chidlren in the Spielberg/Williams Collaboration CD, that's right.

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