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51 members have voted

  1. 1. Are we geeks?

    • Yes we are, and proud of it, too.
      23
    • Let's face it, we are. People who spend so much time on jwfan.net just HAVE to be . . .
      10
    • Maybe you guys are, I'm sure as hell NOT.
      7
    • No, we are just individuals who appreciate the massive talent of JW. That's got nothing to do with being a geek!
      10
    • Bite me!
      0


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I think I obsess over film music as much as anyone obsesses over their favorite music; people know a lot about the music they listen to. So, in terms of liking film music, I would say no, because it's just another type of music. (Sheesh, enough musics?)

Now when it comes to things like Harry Potter, I am definately a geek. A lot of people, even Potter fans, don't remember as much as I do about the books, which probably comes from me having read each countless times, having a darn good memory, and lvoing the books with all my heart. So I think I'm definately geeky in that way, but with film music, not really that much.

~Sturgis

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I actually agree with red rabbit, for once.

Geek is a derogatory label, it has been since it's origin. It has a ghastly stigma. When someone says they are proud to be a geek, I wonder if they know what it really means. They may think of themself as a geek in the current meaning, but what about what it used to mean?

It was a horrid label, like calling someone a leper. In the 90's it became more mainstream because of computer technology, "geeks" became more in the society of influence.

It's not a name to be proud of, it still has a negative connotation. It essentially means you are unbalanced, warped in a social and psychological way.

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I actually agree with red rabbit, for once.

Geek is a derogatory label, it has been since it's origin. It has a ghastly stigma. When someone says they are proud to be a geek, I wonder if they know what it really means. They may think of themself as a geek in the current meaning, but what about what it used to mean?

It was a horrid label, like calling someone a leper. In the 90's it became more mainstream because of computer technology, "geeks" became more in the society of influence.

It's not a name to be proud of, it still has a negative connotation. It essentially means you are unbalanced, warped in a social and psychological way.

I don't agree. What it USED to mean doesn't matter. We don't live in the past, after all--at least most of us don't. Nowadys the term "geek" isn't necessarily derogatory. According to Wikipedia, two of the definitions are as follows:

1. A definition common among self-identified geeks is: "one who is primarily motivated by passion," indicating somebody whose reasoning and decision making is always first and foremost based on his personal passions rather than things like financial reward or social acceptance. Geeks do not see the typical "geeky" interests as interesting, but as objects of passionate devotion. The idea that the pursuit of personal passions should be the fundamental driving force to all decisions could be considered the most basic shared tenet among geeks of all varieties. Geeks consider such pursuits to be their own defining characteristic.

2. A person with a devotion to something in a way that places him or her outside the mainstream. This could be due to the intensity, depth, or subject of their interest. This definition is very broad, and allows for mathematics geeks, engineering geeks, sci-fi geeks, computer geeks, various science geeks, movie and film geeks (cinephile), comics geeks, theatre geeks, history geeks, gamer geeks, music geeks, art geeks, SCA geeks, literature geeks, anime and manga geeks (otaku).

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I actually agree with red rabbit, for once.

Geek is a derogatory label, it has been since it's origin. It has a ghastly stigma. When someone says they are proud to be a geek, I wonder if they know what it really means. They may think of themself as a geek in the current meaning, but what about what it used to mean?

It was a horrid label, like calling someone a leper. In the 90's it became more mainstream because of computer technology, "geeks" became more in the society of influence.

It's not a name to be proud of, it still has a negative connotation. It essentially means you are unbalanced, warped in a social and psychological way.

I don't agree. What it USED to mean doesn't matter. We don't live in the past, after all--at least most of us don't. Nowadys the term "geek" isn't necessarily derogatory. According to Wikipedia, two of the definitions are as follows:

1. A definition common among self-identified geeks is: "one who is primarily motivated by passion," indicating somebody whose reasoning and decision making is always first and foremost based on his personal passions rather than things like financial reward or social acceptance. Geeks do not see the typical "geeky" interests as interesting, but as objects of passionate devotion. The idea that the pursuit of personal passions should be the fundamental driving force to all decisions could be considered the most basic shared tenet among geeks of all varieties. Geeks consider such pursuits to be their own defining characteristic.

2. A person with a devotion to something in a way that places him or her outside the mainstream. This could be due to the intensity, depth, or subject of their interest. This definition is very broad, and allows for mathematics geeks, engineering geeks, sci-fi geeks, computer geeks, various science geeks, movie and film geeks (cinephile), comics geeks, theatre geeks, history geeks, gamer geeks, music geeks, art geeks, SCA geeks, literature geeks, anime and manga geeks (otaku).

What about the rest of the definitions on Wiki? I think you will find a few other, less flattering ones. If you want to understand a word fully, you should research it to find out where it came from. Then you can use that word in context .

I don't agree. What it USED to mean doesn't matter. We don't live in the past, after all--at least most of us don't.

I am not doing that. I'm well aware of how the impression of theword geek has changed. What it did mean DOES matter. It can be very subtle to discern how these things happen, but they do matter, just as any other aspect of reality.

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I'll admit it bugs me somewhat because there are times I feel like some of you are embarrassed or almost ashamed that you listen to film music when I read certain threads.

And like I said it sounds so juvenille to throw around the word geek. I've never thought of myself in that way.

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I for one am certainly not embarrassed that I listen to film score music. In fact I'm pretty damn proud of it. My friends still tease me to this day about listening to it but I just shrug my shoulders, smile and say, "Hey it's what I like." and move on. If people find it weird that I listen to this type of music, it aint my problem.

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To me, it seems that the mainstream view of "geekdom" follows this hierarchy:

Star Trek: the most geeky, as there are numerous movies and multiple television series to geek-out to, and they have their own name ("Trekkies")

Star Wars: slightly less geeky than Trek, but not really; had the prequels been any good, they could've helped here. But they didn't.

Lord of the Rings: definitely less geeky than the previous two, especially after the films came out and became so currently mainstream

Harry Potter: seems to be the least geeky, since there are still movies and books coming out; the "children's book" stigma actually makes it less geeky since it's seen as less involved and complex than LotR

Ray Barnsbury - whose own views are not necessarily reflected above

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I voted for option number one. I do consider myself a geek, and in ways beyond jwfandom, too. When I call myself a geek, it's a tongue-in-cheek and jokingly self-deprecatory way of saying that I'm passionate about stuff most people don't care about, that I go to great lengths to understand/comprehend/get good at these things, and that sometimes these interests temporarily overcome my ability to make "normal" social choices. I don't take kindly to other people calling me a geek seriously, but I've been called worse.

I try not to let my everyday speech overflow with stuff about John Williams, Disneyland, music in general, 3D modeling, painting, and the countless other things I obsess over. Naturally, it still happens a little, and my friends will poke harmless fun at me because of it. But my point is, it's possible to keep the geekiness in check until it's appropriate. In my book, it's good to be able to do that when necessary while still maintaining interesting pursuits.

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Why, thank you. :)

By the way, I do think that it should be okay to share a little of one's geekiness on first dates and so on. Obviously, letting it shine through too much is a dumb idea that's bound to make the other person uncomfortable. But if you're looking for someone to be with for some time...well, they're going to find out sooner or later, right?

EDIT:

Or that the only reason I know the difference between Regions and PAL and NTSC is becuase of the Episode III complete score edit using German dvd rip... lol

I cracked up so hard when I read that, GoodMusician. I confess, I'm exactly the same. :music:

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By the way, I do think that it should be okay to share a little of one's geekiness on first dates and so on. Obviously, letting it shine through too much is a dumb idea that's bound to make the other person uncomfortable. But if you're looking for someone to be with for some time...well, they're going to find out sooner or later, right?

Good point. My girlfriend has been warned of my geekiness early enough and guess what - we're still together, even after all these geeky years! :music:

Perhaps we geeks could have for our motto two lines from the Dream Theater song As I Am's chorus:

To those who understand - I extend my hand

To the doubtful I demand - take me as I am

:)

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  • 2 weeks later...

I think we are all geeks in our own way. We all love JW and his music but we dont let it take over our everyday lives. Im a huge Star Wars and Star Trek fan, I even have a Star Wars tattoo but thats a different story. But Im also into a lot of other things that arent considered geeky. I play hockey and Im a competitive runner. So am I a geek? I probably am but do I care? No, Im proud to be a geek because I know who I am.

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