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What is your favorite Indiana Jones action cue?


Josh500
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Indiana Jones action music  

26 members have voted

  1. 1. Which is your favorite?

    • Flight From Peru
      2
    • Desert Chase
      9
    • Fast Streets of Shanghai
      0
    • The Mine Car Chase
      3
    • Indy's Very First Adventure
      2
    • Escape From Venice
      1
    • Belly of the Steel Beast
      2
    • Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra
      5
    • Other
      2


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I've thought long and hard, but for me it's Desert Chase from the ROTLA!!! I love the way this cue starts . . . it's like being thrust abruptly into the middle of a big big adventure, and it never lets up. Also, I love the way Raiders March is incorporated. For me, this is pure, unadulterated action music, brilliantly performed by the LSO.

I also like Fast Streets of Shaghai and Belly of the Steel Beast, but Desert Chase will always top my list, I think . . . at least until Indy 4 comes along. Then, who knows?

Which one's your favorite??? :mrgreen:

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Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra is pretty much my favorite JW piece period, so that's definately also my favorite action cue. Next would be Escape from Venice.

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Another impossible choice. :mrgreen: All of these are great.

I feel like voting for Other so I can pick the rerecorded music for the Indiana Jones ride at Disneyland--after all, it does contain parts of four of these cues, along with other brilliant selections. I dunno. Maybe I'll come back and vote later, after I've enjoyed a re-listening of all of these cues.

EDIT: By the way, you forgot "Airplane Fight," which would probably beat "Desert Chase" for me.

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I think you should discriminate between 'action music' and 'action scherzos', the former being the underscore to an action sequence (e.g. Belly of the Steal Beast, Desert Chase), the latter being the musically well defined cues that mostly underscore wordless action sequences much like in a ballet, and which can stand alone as concert cues and often feature a more classical-like structure (e.g. Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra, The Basket Chase, The Mine Car Chase). I think this would be suitable, especially because the action scherzo is really a JW trademark, and he mentions this apart category as such himself too.

My favorite action music cue would be The Fast Streets of Shanghai, my favorite action scherzo The Basket Chase (1996 concert arrangement).

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I don't agree. I think the broadest definition of action music (music underscoring an action scene) should be used.

That means you are saying cues like The Basket Chase and Escape from Venice are stylistically comparable to cues like Belly of the Steal Beast and Desert Chase?

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I don't agree. I think the broadest definition of action music (music underscoring an action scene) should be used.

That's means you are saying cues like The Basket Chase and Escape from Venice are stylistically comparable to cues like Belly of the Steal Beast and Desert Chase?

I understand what you're saying, but I don't agree. Whether some pieces are scherzos or not, they are all "action music."

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I don't agree. I think the broadest definition of action music (music underscoring an action scene) should be used.

That's means you are saying cues like The Basket Chase and Escape from Venice are stylistically comparable to cues like Belly of the Steal Beast and Desert Chase?

I understand what you're saying, but I don't agree. Whether some pieces are scherzos or not, they are all "action music."

OK :mrgreen:

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I don't agree. I think the broadest definition of action music (music underscoring an action scene) should be used.

That's means you are saying cues like The Basket Chase and Escape from Venice are stylistically comparable to cues like Belly of the Steal Beast and Desert Chase?

I understand what you're saying, but I don't agree. Whether some pieces are scherzos or not, they are all "action music."

OK :mrgreen:

Fast Streets of Shanghai is also one of my top favorites, which part of it do you like best? My favorite section is at the beginning, when Indy and Willie fall down the building and into the car and meet Short Round for the first time. The music there makes me smile every time! Hahaha.

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Fast Streets of Shanghai is also one of my top favorites, which part of it do you like best? My favorite section is at the beginning, when Indy and Willie fall down the building and into the car and meet Short Round for the first time. The music there makes me smile every time! Hahaha.

While that cue doesn't get my vote in this poll, I do enjoy it, especially that part you're talking about. The first statement of Short Round's theme is great. :mrgreen:

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Fast Streets of Shanghai is also one of my top favorites, which part of it do you like best? My favorite section is at the beginning, when Indy and Willie fall down the building and into the car and meet Short Round for the first time. The music there makes me smile every time! Hahaha.

While that cue doesn't get my vote in this poll, I do enjoy it, especially that part you're talking about. The first statement of Short Round's theme is great. :D

Yeah, but have you noticed that in the movie that brief section is a bit longer? I think it's looped.

So what DID you vote for?

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I don't agree. I think the broadest definition of action music (music underscoring an action scene) should be used.

That's means you are saying cues like The Basket Chase and Escape from Venice are stylistically comparable to cues like Belly of the Steal Beast and Desert Chase?

I understand what you're saying, but I don't agree. Whether some pieces are scherzos or not, they are all "action music."

OK :D

Fast Streets of Shanghai is also one of my top favorites, which part of it do you like best? My favorite section is at the beginning, when Indy and Willie fall down the building and into the car and meet Short Round for the first time. The music there makes me smile every time! Hahaha.

That part is certainly fun :), however my favorite part has to be from 2:48 where the music starts to work towards one of the most rousing Raiders March statements of the franchise! (Scoring the scene where Indy escapes in the enemy's plane.)

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Yeah, but have you noticed that in the movie that brief section is a bit longer? I think it's looped. So what DID you vote for?

Mmmm, I haven't watched ToD in a while. I'll listen for that next time...

And I accidentally voted for "Flight from Peru." I meant to click "Desert Chase," but it was too late. Oh well, I love that cue, too. :D

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Yeah, but have you noticed that in the movie that brief section is a bit longer? I think it's looped. So what DID you vote for?

Mmmm, I haven't watched ToD in a while. I'll listen for that next time...

And I accidentally voted for "Flight from Peru." I meant to click "Desert Chase," but it was too late. Oh well, I love that cue, too. :D

Haha good choice anyway. That cue is so versatile, it has almost the entire musical Indiana Jones spectrum in it.

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Haha good choice anyway. That cue is so versatile, it has almost the entire musical Indiana Jones spectrum in it.

I dunno if I'd say it contains most of Indy's musical spectrum, but it's certainly a diverse (if rather short) cue that manages to be perfect throughout. Its ratio of grin-inducing moments to boring passages is 100%. The first time I heard it outside of the film, I think I literally smiled the whole time. Fun and bizarre pizzicato passages give way to the Raiders' March, heard for the very first time, with both the A and B sections presented in unique and incredible ways. Man, I love that cue...

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I love Desert Chase, I can hear it in my head without even playing it.

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I love Desert Chase, I can hear it in my head without even playing it.

That's good, that's a composer's trait actually, you know that? :D

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That's good, that's a composer's trait actually, you know that?

Well, hearing your own music without playing it is a composer's trait. Hearing a favorite song/cue/piece in your head is something just about everyone can do. :D

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That's good, that's a composer's trait actually, you know that?

Well, hearing your own music without playing it is a composer's trait. Hearing a favorite song/cue/piece in your head is something just about everyone can do. :D

The first thing is true, but not necessary per se. The second thing: I don't think that's entirely true. This would also mean that a lot of poeple can write down music from their memories as good as from hearing a cd. I don't believe that's the case. Most people (the non-composers) sing the melodic lines, but do they think about the instrumentation, about the different accompanying parts, the harmonisation? I don't think so. Musical memory varies greatly among people.

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1. Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra

2. Indy's Very First Adventure

3. Other (Bug Tunnel and Death Trap)

4. Escape from Venice

5. Belly of the Steel Beast

6. The Fast Streets of Shanghai

7. Desert Chase

the rest

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The first thing is true, but not necessary per se. The second thing: I don't think that's entirely true. This would also mean that a lot of poeple can write down music from their memories as good as from hearing a cd. I don't believe that's the case. Most people (the non-composers) sing the melodic lines, but do they think about the instrumentation, about the different accompanying parts, the harmonisation? I don't think so.

Mmmm, I see what you're saying. And yeah, I don't think most non-composers are as cognizant of the various elements that make their favorite pieces so enjoyable. Of course, Joey didn't specify exactly how much he could hear in his head...

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Well I often put Indy's First Adventure in my top overall cue lists (for technical reasons as well as artistic that I won't Horner post here), so it's only fair it gets my vote here. Last Crusade overall is just one great action cue after another.

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I love Desert Chase, I can hear it in my head without even playing it.

That's good, that's a composer's trait actually, you know that? :D

no I didn't know, but I assure you I have no musical ability, I can play the radio and a stereo and thats it.

but I've listened to Desert Chase hundreds if not thousands of times over the last 25 years

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The action in TOD is great, especially with the "Slave Children" theme, but "Desert Chase" will always be my favorite one; next would be "Belly of the Steel Beast" & "Slave Children Crusade", probably tied.

"Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra" is a very nice & original piece for an action scene.

obndy0001.gif

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Scherzo for Motorcycle and Orchestra, followed by Belly of the Steel Beast and the Pen is Mightier than the sword.

Scherzo because it truly is a stand alone piece.

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I think you should discriminate between 'action music' and 'action scherzos',

I agree. Some people are picking their favourite based only on the fact that it is a stand-alone piece that could function as a concert work. For me the greatest John Williams action cues are Battle in the Snow, and Asteroid Field, however you won't hear either of those in the concert hall (unfortunately).

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The first thing is true, but not necessary per se. The second thing: I don't think that's entirely true. This would also mean that a lot of poeple can write down music from their memories as good as from hearing a cd. I don't believe that's the case. Most people (the non-composers) sing the melodic lines, but do they think about the instrumentation, about the different accompanying parts, the harmonisation? I don't think so.
Mmmm, I see what you're saying. And yeah, I don't think most non-composers are as cognizant of the various elements that make their favorite pieces so enjoyable. Of course, Joey didn't specify exactly how much he could hear in his head...
You got me there ROTFLMAO
I love Desert Chase, I can hear it in my head without even playing it.
That's good, that's a composer's trait actually, you know that? :lol:
no I didn't know, but I assure you I have no musical ability, I can play the radio and a stereo and thats it.but I've listened to Desert Chase hundreds if not thousands of times over the last 25 years
Ok that helps, too :blink:
The Asteroid Field actually has a concert arrangement. I don't know who played it (at least the Boston Pops, I'm sure) or where, though.
There is indeed, on the Boston Pops sampler called Music from the Star Wars Saga. Very nice concert arrangement, I see it as the SW equivalent of the Basket Chase (also very Prokofiev-like).
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I must check it out! It's one of my all time favourite JW cues!

I totally agree.

That album features more excellent re-recordings, including my fav recordings of the SW Main Title, Superman March and The Forest Battle and my second fav recording of the Imperial March. The sound quality is superb.

Star_Wars_Saga_Philips_2894.gif

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I like the pizzicato opening of the Asteroid Field's concert arrangment.

Ray Barnsbury - who's going to listen to all the Indy action cues at work today and make his choice

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I like the pizzicato opening of the Asteroid Field's concert arrangment.

Agreed. I love it when Williams uses the orchestra in "pointilistic" sort of way like that.

Although I see what you mean, I don't think 'pointilistic' is a good way of expressing it. Pointilism generally refers to the pointed style of the impressionistic painters of the 19th century. Your statement would suggest a link to impressionism in Williams' music, although it displays little to nothing of that style: it's in fact expressionism in its purest form.

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Although I see what you mean, I don't think 'pointilistic' is a good way of expressing it. Pointilism generally refers to the pointed style of the impressionistic painters of the 19th century. Your statement would suggest a link to impressionism in Williams' music, although it displays little to nothing of that style: it's in fact expressionism in its purest form.

Mmmm, perhaps. I was trying to express how the opening to the concert suite uses "dots" of different timbres in an interesting way. What would be a better way of describing it?

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Although I see what you mean, I don't think 'pointilistic' is a good way of expressing it. Pointilism generally refers to the pointed style of the impressionistic painters of the 19th century. Your statement would suggest a link to impressionism in Williams' music, although it displays little to nothing of that style: it's in fact expressionism in its purest form.

Mmmm, perhaps. I was trying to express how the opening to the concert suite uses "dots" of different timbres in an interesting way. What would be a better way of describing it?

I'd suggest "dottism" ;) No, I don't know, maybe 'punctated rhythmics' or so?

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