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If you took all the best songs from both albums and made one album out of it, it'd be almost as good as Appetite

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It was already on Anthology 2 so no archival value or even a very different mix, on first check the left channel was moved more to the middle, drums are clearer and that's it?

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On 17/09/2022 at 9:47 AM, Naïve Old Fart said:

Do. Not. Care! :lick:

 

Why not?

 

There are certain legendary bands I just can't into: Jethro Tull, Led Zeppelin, ... 

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13 hours ago, Naïve Old Fart said:

... ?

 

I'm sure there are a few other legendary bands that I am supposed to love and yet or some reason don't do it for me. Is this something you are not familiar with, Richard? Do you love everything? Even Ed Sheeran?

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20 hours ago, AC1 said:

 

There are certain legendary bands I just can't into: Jethro Tull, Led Zeppelin, ... 

Always liked Led Zeppelin, but I never cared for The Who at all.

 

And I always preferred The Kinks and even The Doors over the Rolling Stones.

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Led Zep are great. The Who, on the other hand, are phenomenal!

 

 

6 minutes ago, GerateWohl said:

 

And I always preferred The Kinks and even The Doors over the Rolling Stones.

The Stones are nothing more than a 12-bar blues band, but they're still great.

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1 minute ago, Naïve Old Fart said:

The Who, on the other hand, are phenomenal!

I believe they are. But I never had a taste for that art rock or rock opera stuff. Never was a fan of air guitar playing.

But Quadrophenia is a good movie.

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1 minute ago, AC1 said:

What about Ed Sheeran?

I just know him from that Yesterday movie. There He didn't make a big Impression. But He seemed ok to me.

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4 minutes ago, GerateWohl said:

I believe they are. But I never had a taste for that art rock or rock opera stuff. Never was a fan of air guitar playing.

But Quadrophenia is a good movie.

Try WHO BY NUMBERS. It's, probably, their most "normal" record.

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Believe it or not but I have nothing against Billie Eillish. I sometimes put on (stream) her latest album (the only one I know) so it's not that I hate everything that is new (like Thor claims).

 

HappierThanEver_Billie_Eilish.jpg

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29 minutes ago, Naïve Old Fart said:

Try WHO BY NUMBERS. It's, probably, their most "normal" record.

 

While Who's Next is obviously an undeniable classic record, I'm a huge Who fan who's never been big on their 70s era.  My favorite Who goes from the first singles up to Live at Leeds, which basically closes out that first era ('64-'70).

 

Much like The Kinks, they were less good after going "arena rock."

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On 28/09/2022 at 3:46 PM, Jay said:

Every album in this picture dropped within 57 days of each other in the fall of 1991

 

image.png

 

What a season for music!  In between these was also Pocket Full of Kryptonite, fear, Naughty By Nature, No More Tears, Mad Mad World, The Low End Theory... damn!


'91 was also the year of R.E.M's Out Of Time and U2's Achtung Baby. Cracking albums. 

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Oh yea lots of other great albums came out in '91, I was just sticking to that particularly stacked 57 day window when naming more

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Roll the Bones was my first Rush album.  My origin with Rush is that I was listening to the radio late at night when I was 13 or so and Rush's "Freewill" came on and I was completely and utterly transfixed by it.  It then took me a couple of days to figure out what band it was (I thought the lead singer was woman, true story). I then went to a store in my town that sold CDs and Roll the Bones was the only Rush album they had.  Anyway, great album.  For sure their best album of the 90s.

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28 minutes ago, Naïve Old Fart said:

Also, Level 42's GUARANTEED, Rush's ROLL THE BONES, Genesis' WE CAN'T DANCE, and Michael Jackson's DANGEROUS, all between September, and November.


I kinda thought Guaranteed was where the wheels began to come off the wagon for Level 42 ... of the 3 singles, only the title track made the top 40 and they only released another 2 full albums after it. 

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9 minutes ago, Disco Stu said:

I like Counterparts a lot!

 

Unless you are that rarest of animals, a Test for Echo stan.  That one gets my vote for their most forgettable album.

I was referring to Countertops

 

Everything past that I haven't been able to get into too much, yet.

 

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1 hour ago, Disco Stu said:

Oh man, I love Vapor Trails and Clockwork Angels (Snakes/Arrows being the weak link)

I'm the other way around. SNAKES AND ARROWS is my favourite of their final "trilogy".

I can't get past the loudness issues, with VAPOR TRAILS (yes, I know  it's been remixed, but I still don't like it).

It's a shame that both PRESTO and ROLL THE BONES have a very thin, compressed sound. Rupert Hine was not the man for Rush.

1 hour ago, Roll the Bones said:

I do kinda dig Ceiling Unlimited.

Might be the best song on the record. That "part IV of 'Fear'" thing, was totally unnecessary. The Enemy Within, The Weapon, and Witch Hunt are perfect as they are.

1 hour ago, Roll the Bones said:

I was referring to Countertops

 

"Countertops"! Fuck me! ROTFLMAO

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Wow, I really love this that Bob Dylan wrote about The Who's "My Generation."  You don't think of Dylan being so pop culturally "aware," (despite his reference to DiCaprio in Titanic a couple of albums ago) but this is some grade A culture writing.  I love how he ends with a foreshadow of Tommy.

 

I am going to buy this book!

 

Quote

This is a song that does no favors for anyone, and casts doubt on everything.

 

In this song, people are trying to slap you around, slap you in the face, vilify you. They’re rude and they slam you down, take cheap shots. They don’t like you because you pull out all the stops and go for broke. You put your heart and soul into everything and shoot the works, because you got energy and strength and purpose. Because you’re so inspired they put the whammy on, they’re allergic to you, and they have hard feelings. Just your very presence repels them. They give you frosty looks and they’ve had enough of you, and there’s a million others just like you, multiplying every day.

 

You’re in an exclusive club, and you’re advertising yourself. You’re blabbing about your age group, of which you’re a high-ranking member. You can’t conceal your conceit, and you’re snobbish and snooty about it. You’re not trying to drop any big bombshell or cause a scandal, you’re just waving a flag, and you don’t want anyone to comprehend what you’re saying or embrace it, or even try to take it all in. You’re looking down your nose at society and you have no use for it. You’re hoping to croak before senility sets in. You don’t want to be ancient and decrepit, no thank you. I’ll kick the bucket before that happens. You’re looking at the world mortified by the hopelessness of it all.

 

In reality, you’re an eighty-year-old man, being wheeled around in a home for the elderly, and the nurses are getting on your nerves. You say why don’t you all just fade away. You’re in your second childhood, can’t get a word out without stumbling and dribbling. You haven’t any aspirations to live in a fool’s paradise, you’re not looking forward to that, and you’ve got your fingers crossed that you don’t. Knock on wood. You’ll give up the ghost first.

 

You’re talking about your generation, sermonizing, giving a discourse.

 

Straight talk, eyeball to eyeball.


--------

 

Today it is commonplace to stream a movie directly to your phone. So, when you are watching Gloria Swanson as faded movie star Norma Desmond proclaim from the palm of your hand, “I am big, it’s the pictures that got small,” it contains layers of irony that writer/director Billy Wilder could never have imagined. Of course, someone streaming something to their phone is most likely watching something even shorter and faster paced on TikTok, certainly not anything in black and white with a running time of 110 minutes.

Every generation gets to pick and choose what they want from the generations that came before with the same arrogance and ego-driven self-importance that the previous generations had when they picked the bones of the ones before them. Pete Townshend was born in 1945, which puts him at the front end of the baby boomer generation, born right after the Second World War ended. The generation who fathered Pete and the rest of the boomers has been called the Greatest Generation — not a self-congratulatory term at all.

It might be helpful to take a moment and define terms just a bit. What exactly is a generation? Currently, the common definition is the period of time that the statistically largest portion of the population born within a thirty-year period is in control of the zeitgeist. Recently, we have entered a new phase, where anyone entering the age of twenty-two as of 2019 is now a member of Generation Z. While people make jokes about millennials, that group is now old news, as obsolete as all of the previous generations — the baby boomers, Gen X, the Fragile Generation, the Intermediates, the Neutrals, the Dependable, the Unshaken, and the Clean Slate.

Marlon Brando, like Elvis Presley, Little Richard, and the first wave of rockers, fell somewhere between the greatest generation ever and the baby boomers; too young to fight against the Nazis, too old to go to Woodstock. Yet when Brando replied, “Whaddya got?” when a local girl asked him what he was rebelling against in the movie The Wild One, it set the stage for the sixties and the rebellion against the picture-perfect prefab communities the boys came home from the war to build.

Like a lot of boomers, Pete seems to have a chip on his shoulder in this song. But he’s not totally confident, he’s somewhat back on his heels. There’s a certain defensiveness. He knows people put him down just because he gets around. Perhaps he feels like he will never measure up or he knows they resent his generation’s newly abundant leisure time. He wishes they would just disappear, fade away. He hopes he dies before he gets old and is replaced like he is replacing them. Pete can’t even point the finger himself, he depends on his mouthpiece Roger to hurl the invective. That fear is perhaps the most honest thing about the song. We all rail at the previous generation but somehow know it’s only a matter of time until we will become them ourselves.

Pete would probably be the first to tell you. He has a front-row seat for the history of his generation. He could read the picket signs against hatred and war. Well, that certainly ended that, thank you for your service. Each generation seems to have the arrogance of ignorance, opting to throw out what has gone before instead of building on the past. And they have no use for someone like Pete offering the wisdom of his experience, telling them what he has learned on the similar paths he has trod. And if he’d had the audacity to do so, there’s every chance that person would have looked up at Pete and told him that he couldn’t see him, he couldn’t hear him.

And that gave Pete another idea.

https://www.nytimes.com/2022/10/13/books/bob-dylan-book-excerpt.html

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The Animals Remix Docu (interesting footage of the power station building on the cover)

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I'll tell you what's an absolute joy to see, is Bernard Purdie's reaction to hearing "Green Earring" in 2022.  Just watch that happy face.

 

24:54

 

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On 14/10/2022 at 11:35 PM, Disco Stu said:

My money says that @Naïve Old Fart would pick ELP of those three :D 

You are correct.

ELP > Pink Floyd > Petty.

 

EMERSON LAKE AND POWELL is an immensely underrated record. Musically, it's better than BLACK MOON, and IN THE HOT SEAT. It's just a shame that, sonically, it's a turd.

"Learning To Fly" by Floyd is great, but there's much better songs on AMLOR ("One Slip"/"Terminal Frost").

Petty's "Learning To Fly" is from a, generally, decent record, but, imo, it's not quite as good as FULL MOON FEVER.

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Yo La Tengo, which if going by sentimental attachment alone is my official favorite currently working rock band (I've seen them live 8 times!), announced a new album and released the lead single.

 

It's ok, it sounds a bit too much like several previous, and superior, YLT songs.

 

 

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