Jump to content

What is the last score you listened to?


Mr. Breathmask
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 4.9k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Angela's Ashes by John Williams

Amistad by John Williams

Return of the Jedi by John Williams

War of the Worlds by John Williams

Angels in America by Thomas Newman

Meet Joe Black by Thomas Newman

Spitfire Grill by James Horner

Hour of the Gun by Jerry Goldsmith

Wind and the Lion by Jerry Goldsmith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Frost/Nixon:

An unusually restrained effort from Zimmer, though he clearly leaves his own thumbprint on the score. It's got some very good moments, and some that drag. Some nice tension built here and there. Also, the OST has some fantastic cover art.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within (Goldenthal)

I love its huge epic feel and orchestral lushness, it's a very nice score to listen to and it's not afraid to be big and in your face, in fact it embraces it. But I just can't help but be a bit biased against a non-Uematsu FF, it just doesn't feel right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think "minimalism" necessarily equates "restrained."

I know, but scores like Frost/Nixon, The Thin Red Line, and Matchstick Men all have very minimalist qualities. He ain't no Philip Glass, but it's there. It's definitely not unusual for Zimmer to restrain himself either, everyone here is just mostly familiar with his action scores.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think "minimalism" necessarily equates "restrained."

I know, but scores like Frost/Nixon, The Thin Red Line, and Matchstick Men all have very minimalist qualities. He ain't no Philip Glass, but it's there. It's definitely not unusual for Zimmer to restrain himself either, everyone here is just mostly familiar with his action scores.

The only non-action score I'd say that's as restrained as Nixon (of the Zimmer scores I've heard) is Da Vinci, I think. The Holiday, Lion King, and Simpsons Movie are all examples of great but unrestrained Zimmer scores. They're different than his usual fare, but they aren't exactly subtle scores. Of course you'd probably know more on the matter than myself.

Born on the Fourth of July:

Finally, I've completed the Oliver Stone trilogy with a very beautiful and touching score. "The Early Days" is fantastic, as it "Born on the Fourth of July." Great trumpet solos. The entire orchestra is sooo much better than the recording on the Music of John Williams boxset.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think "minimalism" necessarily equates "restrained."

I know, but scores like Frost/Nixon, The Thin Red Line, and Matchstick Men all have very minimalist qualities. He ain't no Philip Glass, but it's there. It's definitely not unusual for Zimmer to restrain himself either, everyone here is just mostly familiar with his action scores.

The only non-action score I'd say that's as restrained as Nixon (of the Zimmer scores I've heard) is Da Vinci, I think. The Holiday, Lion King, and Simpsons Movie are all examples of great but unrestrained Zimmer scores. They're different than his usual fare, but they aren't exactly subtle scores. Of course you'd probably know more on the matter than myself.

I may have misinterpreted what you originally said. What do you mean by restrained? When I think restrained Zimmer, I mainly think of his drama and comedy scores. So pretty much all the quieter and lighter stuff.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My complete intended edition for The Mummy (Goldsmith). Such an awesome score, I hope one day it gets a proper release, with every cue as originally done. Even with all the source material but separate from Goldsmith's original tracks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I meant something more subtle. "Gumption" is fantastic, but it's just as in-your-face as "Jack Sparrow."

Okay, I see. The Thin Red Line, The Pledge, Beyond Rangoon, The Burning Plain, Hannibal, Millennium: Tribal Wisdom And The Modern World, The Ring, Smilla's Sense Of Snow, and The Weather Man would fit the bill of "restrained," and there are probably a couple more.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Psycho (the Elfman recording)

I am beginning to regret ever saying that I was not too fond of this score. This particular recording is probably the best I have heard of Psycho, Danny Elfman's love and respect for Herrmann's music is very evident here. Apparently half of the score is missing, but I do not mind.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are the track listings for my complete set for The Mummy. Tracks 1, 2, 3, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 20, 22 from Disc 1 as well as tracks 8, 9, 12, 13, 15, and 16 from Disc 2 are from the OST. Of course with track 8 and 12 from Disc 2 I inserted the missing opening from the DVD isolated score.

DISC ONE

01. Imhotep (4:17)

02. The Sarcophagus (2:14)

03. Tauger Attack (2:20)

04. Horseback Pursuit (1:22)

05. The Desert Will Kill Him (1:00)

06. The Librarian (0:46)

07. The Puzzle Box (0:36)

08. Hanging O'Connell (0:57)

09. Giza Port (1:58)

10. Night Boarders (4:05)

11. The Caravan (2:16)

12. This One Is Strong (0:28)

13. Camel Race (3:23)

14. There Was Light (0:28)

15. The Tunnels (1:02)

16. Blue Gold (0:50)

17. Salt Acid (0:24)

18. The Crypt (2:24)

19. Broken Bottle (0:10)

20. Mumia Attack (2:17)

21. Rick and Evelyn (1:02)

22. Discoveries (3:38)

23. The Story Of Hom-Dai (0:44)

24. Plague Of Locusts (4:54)

25. Bringer Of Death (1:08)

26. Language Of The Slaves (1:22)

DISC TWO

01. Finishing The Job (1:13)

02. We Are In Serious Trouble (0:55)

03. His Powers Are Growing (0:30)

04. Hunting The Egyptologist (0:26)

05. Plague Of Flies (0:52)

06. Bourbon Chaser (0:18)

07. Through The Keyhole (1:22)

08. My Favorite Plague (4:03)*

09. Crowd Control (3:09)

10. Back To Hamunaptra (2:25)

11. Quicksand (1:11)

12. Rebirth (8:48)*

13. The Mummy (6:16)

14. Escaping Hamunaptra (1:11)

15. The Sand Volcano (3:14)*

16. End Credits (2:25)

17. Boat Piano 1 (Source) (2:00)

18. Boat Piano 2 (Source) (2:06)

19. The Camels (Source) (0:38)

20. Fort Brydon, Cairo (Source) (1:16)

21. Her Majesty's Royal Air Corp (Source) (0:50)

*CONTAINS UNUSED MUSIC

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Psycho (the Elfman recording)

I am beginning to regret ever saying that I was not too fond of this score. This particular recording is probably the best I have heard of Psycho, Danny Elfman's love and respect for Herrmann's music is very evident here. Apparently half of the score is missing, but I do not mind.

This is probably as close to the original performance as anyone has gotten. I enjoy Joel McNeely's complete recording released by Varese but Elfman's is superb.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Superman Returns - John Ottman

I just listened to the thing that isn't an OST album, and my appreciation for this score is definitely boosted. I'm beginning to think maybe the music wasn't mixed in the film too well--and there's probably some good stuff that went unused--because there are some really nice touches that definitely raise my overall perception of the aesthetics of the score above the generally plastic impression I got from the film and the OST. There are still a few cues that sound almost digitally "enhanced" or something, not quite natural, but the majority of it sounded a good bit better than I remember. There's a lot of orchestrational bits that I appreciated, including some genuinely solid useage of woodwinds in many emotional contexts.

Some of my complaints still remain:

- Love Theme: Should've used the original harmonies in more cues than just the main and end titles. There were places I really liked the new harmonization, and it fit, but there were spots where it really hurt. "Things Have Changed" was one spot where it just really begged to go into the original progression, and it stings when it goes to the new one. I think it works fine on "How Could You Leave Us?", etc. But some variation would've been really good.

- A lot of the action material is actually rather good, but "Rough Flight" still just doesn't quite gel for me. Especially for the kind of scene it was written for, I want that really solid, cohesive set piece.

- Bryan, John, it's okay; the A theme won't bite you if you use it. "He's Back" really needed the A theme, both musically and cinematically, IMO. It was such a joyous surprise to hear the "End Credits" cue begin not with the B theme as in film, but with the ostinato and A theme in the traditional Superman finale fashion! Was this the original intention, and the "Fly Away" cue a partial rescore? I'm curious and somewhat confused--I don't know where "Reprise" was supposed to come from. Was there a recut?

Aside from these things, it's definitely a solidly enjoyable score, one that greatly benefits from a complete presentation. I think ultimately the disappointing thing for me is that the film and score don't quite know which way they want to go. They're a bit too contemporary and glossy for them to really work as smooth follow-ups to the Donner film(s)/Williams score, but they've got the big nods that keep it from being its own new thing. It's kind of sad, but I can nonetheless find things to enjoy in them. I'm gonna have to say I like the score better than the film. The complete presentation definitely opened up my ears to some really entertaining stuff. I may have to re-evaluate my ratings system but...I'm gonna give this puppy a 4/5. I can't give it any more, but I enjoyed it too much to put it at a 3.5/5--for now, anyway. Yep. 4/5

Link to comment
Share on other sites

- Bryan, John, it's okay; the A theme won't bite you if you use it. "He's Back" really needed the A theme, both musically and cinematically, IMO. It was such a joyous surprise to hear the "End Credits" cue begin not with the B theme as in film, but with the ostinato and A theme in the traditional Superman finale fashion! Was this the original intention, and the "Fly Away" cue a partial rescore? I'm curious and somewhat confused--I don't know where "Reprise" was supposed to come from. Was there a recut?

I think "Reprise" was replaced with "Parting Words" in the film (because for such a serious character moment, you just can't use that old love theme). It's listed as an alternate cue. As for "Fly Away" and "End Credits," that's just bad arranging. Ottman should have made it one cue, not awkwardly cut to the end of the march and then restarted it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

- Bryan, John, it's okay; the A theme won't bite you if you use it. "He's Back" really needed the A theme, both musically and cinematically, IMO. It was such a joyous surprise to hear the "End Credits" cue begin not with the B theme as in film, but with the ostinato and A theme in the traditional Superman finale fashion! Was this the original intention, and the "Fly Away" cue a partial rescore? I'm curious and somewhat confused--I don't know where "Reprise" was supposed to come from. Was there a recut?

I think "Reprise" was replaced with "Parting Words" in the film (because for such a serious character moment, you just can't use that old love theme). It's listed as an alternate cue. As for "Fly Away" and "End Credits," that's just bad arranging. Ottman should have made it one cue, not awkwardly cut to the end of the march and then restart it.

Superman ii has the same problem in the finale. But i like it, like ottman's

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm not at all surprised some people on this board still find Superman Returns' score boring, even in complete form. :cool:

I still enjoy it and I still enjoy it more than Williams' original Superman: The Movie score. Yes you read that right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So what? It's not like he said he preferred The Godfather Part III over either of the others.

Or is it?

I've never seen any of the Godfather movies or heard the music...so I can't comment on those. No I don't plan to either.

Anywhoo...I listened to the "Main Titles" from Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home and I wonder who's bright idea it was to edit out the opening notes from the Paramount Logo part. On the MCA CD you can obviously hear it's a fade in.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Empire of the Sun by John Williams

The Ghost and the Darkness by Jerry Goldsmith

Minority Report by John Williams

The Russia House by Jerry Goldsmith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Watch the first two films and skip 3. Most fans pretend it was never made.

:P

Small Soldiers - Goldsmith

Spacehunter - Bernstein

I wouldn't skip Part III. It definitely has a far worse reputation than it deserves

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Les Choristes:

Absolutely gorgeous. My favorite melody is probably "Caresse Sur L'océan," but really they're all fantastic. Fantastic use of the children's choir, and I like how it's used in non-source music (ie "L'arrivée À L'école"). Really fantastic. My only complaint is that sometimes the choir and the orchestra seem to be a tad bit off. Other than that it is magnificent.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Loch Ness - Trevor Jones

Never heard that, but I love his scores for both "Excalibur", and "The Dark Crystal", the latter of which I have the 2-c.d. set, which is well worth getting. "Greystoke"'s not bad, nor is "The Last Place On Earth".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Loch Ness - Trevor Jones

Never heard that, but I love his scores for both "Excalibur", and "The Dark Crystal", the latter of which I have the 2-c.d. set, which is well worth getting. "Greystoke"'s not bad, nor is "The Last Place On Earth".

Sorry, guys, "Greystoke" was scored by John Scott. My mistake! :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Basic Instinct, the Prometheus edition. Hot damn, if that isn't some of the sexist, sultryest, sweatiest music I have ever heard, I'll eat my Hans Zimmer collection!!!

It is indeed :( But I do prefer the original 44-minute Varese edition. A much smoother listen.

Karol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Basic Instinct, the Prometheus edition. Hot damn, if that isn't some of the sexist, sultryest, sweatiest music I have ever heard, I'll eat my Hans Zimmer collection!!!

It is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Basic Instinct, the Prometheus edition. Hot damn, if that isn't some of the sexist, sultryest, sweatiest music I have ever heard, I'll eat my Hans Zimmer collection!!!

It is indeed :( But I do prefer the original 44-minute Varese edition. A much smoother listen.

Karol

I hear what you are saying, Karol, but even when it is trying NOT to be sexy, (e.g., "One Shot"), it STILL ends up being sexy! How on Earth did J.G. do it?! Even "Body Heat" isn't this sexy, and that is sexy, with a capital SEX.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.