Jump to content

Your THREE favourite and most precious films.


Quintus
 Share

Recommended Posts

1) The Patriot (the first date movie my wife and I went on)

2) Star Trek V: The Final Frontier (the first Star Trek movie I saw in the theaters and the first movie soundtrack I ever bought)

3) E.T. (first John Williams scored movie I ever saw)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 109
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

1) The Patriot (the first date movie my wife and I went on)

Ew... Roland Emmerich. :P

Some of the action sequences in the film are good, but man the film is so mediocre. What's with all the random slow motion shots of simple things? Did he not take long enough takes or something? Come on! I also almost died watching the extended cut, which I have on Blu-Ray. 3 hours of that movie is not fun.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1) The Patriot (the first date movie my wife and I went on)

Ew... Roland Emmerich. :sleepy:

Some of the action sequences in the film are good, but man the film is so mediocre. What's with all the random slow motion shots of simple things? Did he not take long enough takes or something? Come on! I also almost died watching the extended cut, which I have on Blu-Ray. 3 hours of that movie is not fun.

Contenential soldier getting head blow off by cannon ball = instant girlfriend head buried in shoulder :sleepy:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1) The Patriot (the first date movie my wife and I went on)

Ew... Roland Emmerich. :P

Some of the action sequences in the film are good, but man the film is so mediocre. What's with all the random slow motion shots of simple things? Did he not take long enough takes or something? Come on! I also almost died watching the extended cut, which I have on Blu-Ray. 3 hours of that movie is not fun.

Contenential soldier getting head blow off by cannon ball = instant girlfriend head buried in shoulder :)

Ah so all the interest was in the girl, not the movie. I thought it was both. Either way, glad that worked out for ya.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Empire Strikes Back

Star Wars

Return of the Jedi (the three)

E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial

Back to the Future

Raiders of the Lost Ark

Jaws

Back to the Future Part II

Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom

Batman Returns

Batman

Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade

Star Trek: First Contact

Back to the Future Part III

Those are my favorites.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmmmmmm, tough one. I guess I'll go with (in no order):

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King

Raiders of the Lost Ark (but really it could be any of the original 3)

Jurassic Park

I tried to watch Brazil a few months back and I really struggled with it. It wasn't a bad film my any means, but I just didn't get the appeal. And I love Gilliam movies usually.

Yeah, I tried to watch that a few months ago also. I just didn't get it at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1) Jurassic Park (Steven Spielberg)

2) Timeline (Richard Donner)

3) Count of Monte Cristo (Kevin Reynolds)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Star Wars - Episode IV: A New Hope

Star Wars - Episode V: The Empire Strikes Back

Star Wars - Episode VI: Return of the Jedi

Childhood favorites that still can't be beat. (Sith is very close behind Jedi, however.)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Spoken like a true Jedi!
2) Timeline (Richard Donner)

Really? Never saw that one coming, it has to be said. I've never even seen it. Anyone else here rate it?

Its a really really really bad movie Quint. Its a horrible adaption of a pretty good book. I wish they'd at least used the ending from the book, it was evil.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Spoken like a true Jedi!
2) Timeline (Richard Donner)

Really? Never saw that one coming, it has to be said. I've never even seen it. Anyone else here rate it?

Its a really really really bad movie Quint. Its a horrible adaption of a pretty good book. I wish they'd at least used the ending from the book, it was evil.

Joey, I must disagree. I bought it once because I wanted to waste some time with a B movie (every review I had read had burnt it down).

However, this movie turnt out to be one of the greatest surprises I ever experienced with a movie. The B element is indeed there (it's still time-traveling you know), but the cinematography, the story and the production design are top-notch. One will be sceptical in the beginning, although the intro is very suspenseful already. But the further the story develops, it becomes very, very realistic and VERY exciting. The second half of the movie I was really sucked into the movie, and the finale is one of the best ever done by Donner. The score is very good also.

I really don't see why people don't like it, it might be because the French win and the Anglosaksian guys lose :P I have watched the dvd around 20 or so and it still gives me chills when I watch it.

It's certainly a class higher than 'real' B movies like 'The Mummy', 'The Librarian' or 'The Core'.

Joey, please give it a second chance and re-watch it, but not in the company of people who criticize every single shot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember it being slated on release, but since you went to the effort and argued its case, I'll give it the benefit of the doubt and seek it out. I'll be sure to let you know what I think of it :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I tried to watch Brazil a few months back and I really struggled with it. It wasn't a bad film my any means, but I just didn't get the appeal. And I love Gilliam movies usually.

Yeah, I tried to watch that a few months ago also. I just didn't get it at all.

You should mention it in the "Films You Don't Get" thread :lol:

Seriously though, different strokes and all that. The first time I watched it I wasn't sure I understood it at all, I just know that it really affected me. For weeks I couldn't get it out of my head. So I watched it again, and then it all clicked. It is in many ways quite a strange film. Some of the humour is very obvious and almost slapstick in places, and yet it's really a very dark film. Overall I think it's the incredible atmosphere that holds the whole thing together so well.

I know I've already mentioned my top three, but honourable mention has to go to:

Jean de Florette/Manon des Sources (1985/1986) (Incredible and tragic tale)

Heat (1996) (THE best cops 'n' robbers film EVER)

Jaws (1975) (...there's no need to say anything about this one surely... :) )

Actually my "honourable mention" list would probably stretch to about 50 films if I let it...

Funny that even though I normally don't care much for the 80s, and 80s films, 80s music, 80s fashion, and 80s bland culture overall, and yet three of my all time top six movies come from 1985 or 1986! (Brazil, The Singing Detectice, and Jean de Florette/Manon des Sources)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Spoken like a true Jedi!
2) Timeline (Richard Donner)

Really? Never saw that one coming, it has to be said. I've never even seen it. Anyone else here rate it?

Its a really really really bad movie Quint. Its a horrible adaption of a pretty good book. I wish they'd at least used the ending from the book, it was evil.

Oh yeah. How Donniger is taken out in the book is much better. And the book is much more grotesque. There's really no such thing as a "good guy" or a "bad guy" in the book when it comes to the English vs. the French. Plus constant references to Medieval torture and how King Edward II was supposedly put to death.

And its a shame what happened with JG's score to the movie too.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I personally think Michael Crichton - as well as many "thrill writers"- have(d?) a problem with satisfactory endings. "Timeline" is my favorite Michael Crichton novel, though.

Hm, my three most precious films... this is hard, so I will list ones that I cherished as a (younger) child.

Toy Story

Brave Little Toaster

Cats Don't Dance

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Spoken like a true Jedi!
2) Timeline (Richard Donner)

Really? Never saw that one coming, it has to be said. I've never even seen it. Anyone else here rate it?

Its a really really really bad movie Quint. Its a horrible adaption of a pretty good book. I wish they'd at least used the ending from the book, it was evil.

Joey, I must disagree. I bought it once because I wanted to waste some time with a B movie (every review I had read had burnt it down).

However, this movie turnt out to be one of the greatest surprises I ever experienced with a movie. The B element is indeed there (it's still time-traveling you know), but the cinematography, the story and the production design are top-notch. One will be sceptical in the beginning, although the intro is very suspenseful already. But the further the story develops, it becomes very, very realistic and VERY exciting. The second half of the movie I was really sucked into the movie, and the finale is one of the best ever done by Donner. The score is very good also.

I really don't see why people don't like it, it might be because the French win and the Anglosaksian guys lose :P I have watched the dvd around 20 or so and it still gives me chills when I watch it.

It's certainly a class higher than 'real' B movies like 'The Mummy', 'The Librarian' or 'The Core'.

Joey, please give it a second chance and re-watch it, but not in the company of people who criticize every single shot.

I've watched it several times since its theatrical release, my sister likes it ok. I don't hate Paul Walker like alot of people do. And I like Brian Tylers score.

The story is not top notch, its really watered down, and not in a good way. The finale is terrible. Glad you like it, but after the awesome ending in the book, I can't believe they ended the film like they did.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I personally think Michael Crichton - as well as many "thrill writers"- have(d?) a problem with satisfactory endings. "Timeline" is my favorite Michael Crichton novel, though.

Hm, my three most precious films... this is hard, so I will list ones that I cherished as a (younger) child.

Toy Story

Brave Little Toaster

Cats Don't Dance

A fine selection of animated films. I find Cats Don't Dance to be a particularly underrated goodie.

Oh, geez...I've been trying to figure this out.

Casablanca - What can I say? It has it all.

Groundhog Day - My favorite comedy this side of the 1966 Batman.

Apollo 13 - It's a real classic among my family, and this is one of our most quoted films. I love it.

I wanted to put a straight action/adventure film on here, but it's just flat too hard to pick between Star Wars, Back to the Future, and Raiders of the Lost Ark. I'd say this three is a pretty fair estimation though--right now, anyway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember it being slated on release, but since you went to the effort and argued its case, I'll give it the benefit of the doubt and seek it out. I'll be sure to let you know what I think of it ;)

Thank you, and I am very interested in your judgement :lol:

In any case, for me it's a special movie. It even sparked my interest in 13th century architecture...:spiny:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ferris Bueller's Day Off -- always my most cherished and favorite film of all-time

The Lion King -- one of the few films to have me speechless in the opening minute

The Omen -- my husband and I officially became a couple after watching this movie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Easy: C.E.3.K.,

Blade Runner,

Superman.

C.E.3.K. is a wonderful film about wishfullment, and following your dream. O.k., so Dreyfuss' dream comes at a price (the total destruction of his family) but it doesn't always have to be like this. If I was married, and with a family, I would probably not regard this film as highly as I do (and it's no surprise that Spielberg said that he could not make this film now). The fact is that I'm not, and I do.

Blade Runner asks-and answers-a lot of questions about what it is like to be human, the nature of love, and also, especially in this current cilmate of genetic modificaction on all levels, the future of the human race itself. It is no surprise that the most "human" character in the film is somone who is "made in Detroit".

Superman is a film that has crept up my Top 10 list over the years. It is, simply, a supreme piece of entertainment, made with so much genuine love that it almost overwhelms me when I watch it. One can almost feel the affection that Donner, et. al. had for the film while they were making it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The first two are easy.

1. E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial

Don McKellar, on the occasion of the film's 20th anniversary theatrical release, wrote in
Village Voice
(the publication that delights in trashing Spielberg), "
E.T.
is a dog movie. Genre-wise, I mean. It's about a boy meeting a dog, naming it, taming it, learning from it, and growing up." To a large extent, I see his point. Narratively, thematically,
E.T.
breaks no new ground -- but it has no such pretensions in the first place. The longing for a place that one can call home, the redemption that friendship can bring us -- this is well-trodden territory, but few have the talent to blaze the trail with such brio as Spielberg does. In his hands -- and with tremendous aid from the usual suspects, including Allen Daviau and John Williams at the height of their powers -- a simple tale becomes pop myth -- cinemagic, if you like.

2. Back to the Future

Pitch-perfect casting. Crispin Glover as the affably hapless dad. Christopher Lloyd as the mad but avuncular scientist. The premise is clever and well-executed, and Alan Silvestri's score is deservedly clamored after. But, above all, Michael J. Fox makes this movie; his sitcom brilliance translates seamlessly to the big screen. Nearly 25 years later, it's amazing how well this film holds up as a piece of pure entertainment. (OK, the proud, unabashed '80s materialism is a little jarring -- but at least it's honest.)

A wide array of films jostling for the third position. 12 Angry Men? Casablanca? The Sound of Music? Roman Holiday? I'm tempted to go with Before Sunrise -- the ostensibly naturalistic quality to the setting and script has always separated it from other romance films in my mind -- but, rhythmically the dialogue has always seemed a little off to me. The garrulity is a little artificially fluid, maybe? Or maybe I'm just not used to people capable of streaming quasi-bohemian, pseudo-intellectual blather with so little...buffering, if I may.

At the moment I will go with...

3. Bridge to Terabithia

One of few films that approach the quality of their source material. It's so emotionally affecting because the film, unlike so many "family movies" these days, actually takes the time to develop its characters deeply and authentically, and it doesn't paint an overly tidy or sentimental picture of childhood. In some ways, the film is like
E.T.
in its depiction of lost or disaffected children seeking their way in a confounding world and finding solace in each other. But with the fantastical elements confined to its protagonists' imaginations, I wonder if the film takes on a different kind of resonance than
E.T.
AnnaSophia Robb is incandescent as the spritely Leslie Burke.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Bridge to Terabithia is a surprising but perfectly justified choice. I'd never read the book before seeing the movie, but when I saw it I was deeply moved by the strong sense of childhood wonderment and the story's underlining bittersweet tragedy - as a lesson in dealing with bereavement it was bang on the money. The performances were superb, especially the beautiful young lady who played Leslie, who was simply spellbinding.

Oh and just a note regarding your selection of the fantastic BTTF:

(OK, the proud, unabashed '80s materialism is a little jarring -- but at least it's honest.)

Things haven't changed at all since that decade. I personally don't finding it distracting in the slightest.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jean de Florette/Manon des Sources (1985/1986) (Incredible and tragic tale)

pixie, I probably asked this before but have you seen La Gloire De Mon Père (My Father's Glory) and Le Château De Ma Mère (My Mother's Castle)? These two movies (about Marcel Pagnol's childhood holidays) have hardly any plot to speak of but they capture nostalgia like you have never seen before. Personally, I love them more than Jean de Florette/Manon des Sources.

Alex

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jean de Florette/Manon des Sources (1985/1986) (Incredible and tragic tale)

pixie, I probably asked this before but have you seen La Gloire De Mon Père (My Father's Glory) and Le Château De Ma Mère (My Mother's Castle)? These two movies (about Marcel Pagnol's childhood holidays) have hardly any plot to speak of but they capture nostalgia like you have never seen before. Personally, I love them more than Jean de Florette/Manon des Sources.

Alex

I have seen parts of one of them (I think my parents were watching them one evening on video back in the early 90s), but I have not given either film a proper viewing. Enough time has since passed that I have no memory of the clips I saw, so it's probably time to get hold of them. Thanks for the recommendation. I'll let you know what I think. :mrgreen:

As for Jean/Manon I just love the incredibly deep layers to each character. Even the hunchback in the first film who starts off as a completely naive optimist ends up visiting some very dark places by the end of the film. Likewise both of the antagonists (Ugolin and Yves Montand's character) become tragic and almost sympathetic characters during Manon. Ugolin especially is almost tear-jerkingly pitiful by the end.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh and just a note regarding your selection of the fantastic BTTF:
(OK, the proud, unabashed '80s materialism is a little jarring -- but at least it's honest.)

Things haven't changed at all since that decade. I personally don't finding it distracting in the slightest.

I never really interpreted it so much as materialism as simply those things being happy side-effects to the changes within the characters. George found his courage, and was willing to take a chance with his writing, and he was successful in it. It could've been the nicest house in the world, but if the family was the same dysfunctional family of push-overs and alcoholics, the ending would certainly not have the same vibe at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jean de Florette/Manon des Sources (1985/1986) (Incredible and tragic tale)

pixie, I probably asked this before but have you seen La Gloire De Mon Père (My Father's Glory) and Le Château De Ma Mère (My Mother's Castle)? These two movies (about Marcel Pagnol's childhood holidays) have hardly any plot to speak of but they capture nostalgia like you have never seen before. Personally, I love them more than Jean de Florette/Manon des Sources.

Alex

Just checked out Borders and they didn't have them in stock (they have a crap selection these days!) so I came home and ordered them from Amazon Marketplace. Sixteen bucks for both movies, including shipping! I'll be enjoying some classic '90s French cinema by the end of next week. :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh and just a note regarding your selection of the fantastic BTTF:
(OK, the proud, unabashed '80s materialism is a little jarring -- but at least it's honest.)

Things haven't changed at all since that decade. I personally don't finding it distracting in the slightest.

I never really interpreted it so much as materialism as simply those things being happy side-effects to the changes within the characters. George found his courage, and was willing to take a chance with his writing, and he was successful in it. It could've been the nicest house in the world, but if the family was the same dysfunctional family of push-overs and alcoholics, the ending would certainly not have the same vibe at all.

I certainly don't mean it's a devastating indictment of the movie -- or even of '80s culture. If anything, it's more about the current day, in which we're every bit as materialistic -- just in a more chagrined, sweep-it-under-the-rug sort of way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Jean de Florette/Manon des Sources (1985/1986) (Incredible and tragic tale)

pixie, I probably asked this before but have you seen La Gloire De Mon Père (My Father's Glory) and Le Château De Ma Mère (My Mother's Castle)? These two movies (about Marcel Pagnol's childhood holidays) have hardly any plot to speak of but they capture nostalgia like you have never seen before. Personally, I love them more than Jean de Florette/Manon des Sources.

Alex

Just checked out Borders and they didn't have them in stock (they have a crap selection these days!) so I came home and ordered them from Amazon Marketplace. Sixteen bucks for both movies, including shipping! I'll be enjoying some classic '90s French cinema by the end of next week. ^_^

Great! I hope you will enjoy them.

BTW, Vladimir Cosma's score is great too. Both scores are released on one CD.

Alex

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Amadeus

Master & Commander

And the third one would be some kind of thriller. Maybe one of the Nolan's films. Maybe Vertigo or "Rear Window". And maybe Chinatown. I'm not sure. It literally varies from day to day.

Karol

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh and just a note regarding your selection of the fantastic BTTF:
(OK, the proud, unabashed '80s materialism is a little jarring -- but at least it's honest.)

Things haven't changed at all since that decade. I personally don't finding it distracting in the slightest.

I never really interpreted it so much as materialism as simply those things being happy side-effects to the changes within the characters. George found his courage, and was willing to take a chance with his writing, and he was successful in it. It could've been the nicest house in the world, but if the family was the same dysfunctional family of push-overs and alcoholics, the ending would certainly not have the same vibe at all.

I certainly don't mean it's a devastating indictment of the movie -- or even of '80s culture. If anything, it's more about the current day, in which we're every bit as materialistic -- just in a more chagrined, sweep-it-under-the-rug sort of way.

Seeing the film recently, I loved it more than ever, but the ending offended me a great deal. It feels like Zemeckis is getting his wonderfully depraved and immoral sense of humor ready to make a big joke on 80's consumerism....but the joke never comes. For some reason, this movie think that the McFly's becoming wealthy yuppies is a good thing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh and just a note regarding your selection of the fantastic BTTF:
(OK, the proud, unabashed '80s materialism is a little jarring -- but at least it's honest.)

Things haven't changed at all since that decade. I personally don't finding it distracting in the slightest.

I never really interpreted it so much as materialism as simply those things being happy side-effects to the changes within the characters. George found his courage, and was willing to take a chance with his writing, and he was successful in it. It could've been the nicest house in the world, but if the family was the same dysfunctional family of push-overs and alcoholics, the ending would certainly not have the same vibe at all.

I certainly don't mean it's a devastating indictment of the movie -- or even of '80s culture. If anything, it's more about the current day, in which we're every bit as materialistic -- just in a more chagrined, sweep-it-under-the-rug sort of way.

Seeing the film recently, I loved it more than ever, but the ending offended me a great deal. It feels like Zemeckis is getting his wonderfully depraved and immoral sense of humor ready to make a big joke on 80's consumerism....but the joke never comes. For some reason, this movie think that the McFly's becoming wealthy yuppies is a good thing.

I think the fact that they're yuppies is irrelevant, it's that they've actually made something of their lives as opposed to being the alcoholic, wuss, burger-flipping failures they were, and that Marty saw himself becoming as the last in the line. In fact, I never saw them as yuppies, but even so, is that a bad thing if it's a result of following your dreams, as George did? I don't see it that way at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It erases who they were, and turns them into a postcard image of who they 'should' be. If they were successful, than they are no longer the same people. The fact that it turned them into succeful people is besides the point. It turned them into someone else, and we're supposed to accept it because it's a satisfying stereotype of what society sees as success. It's wrong, and untrue to the spirit of the film.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It erases who they were, and turns them into a postcard image of who they 'should' be. If they were successful, than they are no longer the same people. The fact that it turned them into succeful people is besides the point. It turned them into someone else, and we're supposed to accept it because it's a satisfying stereotype of what society sees as success. It's wrong, and untrue to the spirit of the film.

I'm not quite getting your complaint here. They were all screwed up at the start of the film, but when Marty went back, he got his parents to start tapping their potential. His mother didn't become an alcoholic, and found a better balance between responsibility and fun, for herself and for her children. George found his courage, and didn't like his fear get in the way of his dreams. I don't understand what you're looking for instead of what you have in the bold here. If you're saying that your issue is that they're no longer the same people, well...I mean, it's a time travel movie (among other things). This sorta thing comes with the territory. But even so, I'd say yes and no to the "they're no longer the same people" thing. It's still them, just them after they've actually worked out some of their personal crap.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It erases who they were, and turns them into a postcard image of who they 'should' be. If they were successful, than they are no longer the same people. The fact that it turned them into succeful people is besides the point. It turned them into someone else, and we're supposed to accept it because it's a satisfying stereotype of what society sees as success. It's wrong, and untrue to the spirit of the film.

I'm not quite getting your complaint here. They were all screwed up at the start of the film, but when Marty went back, he got his parents to start tapping their potential. His mother didn't become an alcoholic, and found a better balance between responsibility and fun, for herself and for her children. George found his courage, and didn't like his fear get in the way of his dreams. I don't understand what you're looking for instead of what you have in the bold here. If you're saying that your issue is that they're no longer the same people, well...I mean, it's a time travel movie (among other things). This sorta thing comes with the territory. But even so, I'd say yes and no to the "they're no longer the same people" thing. It's still them, just them after they've actually worked out some of their personal crap.

I feel the general vibe of Morlock's critique, but I think it's a little over the top to say that the McFlys as portrayed at the end of the film are "wrong." As I wrote earlier, it's striking to see "success" evoked so vividly in terms of material wealth -- and, I daresay, conspicuous consumerist material wealth -- but does that really do the characters a disservice? Honestly, tonally, it would have been far more off to end the film on a note of stinging irony.

I think Gale and Zemeckis just went with quickest possible way cinematically to demonstrate the transformation "undergone" by the family in response to the difference Marty made in his parents' lives.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't think it was an intentional statement of "and they all lived happily ever after, because the're yuppies". But it is one severly undercooked element in the film for me. For other filmmakers, I'd be thankful to have gotten such a smart movie to begin with. With Zemeckis and Gale...I find myself expecting more wit. And putting something as substantial as that ending (well, it is to me and to some others, I guess not to most) as a throw-away moment irks me. I still feel it's wrong (to show that as a model of success- of course it's better than alcoholism, but, to me, it implies the erosion of character, and a distasteful conformity) and untrue to the spirit of the Two Bobs' work in general, this movie in particular.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Honestly, why do people have to over anaylise such unimportant things about movies? BTTF has a heart the size of Texas and that is all that really matters.

I'd swear some people will go out of their way to find fault with a good film. ROTFLMAO

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Honestly, why do people have to over anaylise such unimportant things about movies? BTTF has a heart the size of Texas and that is all that really matters.

I'd swear some people will go out of their way to find fault with a good film. ROTFLMAO

I can't say I quite understand that. We're on a forum dedicated to film music, with a major interest in film. Why on earth shouldn't we go into the details? Why on earth should I care how big anyone thinks BTTF's heart is? I know how I feel about it, and that's an entirely subjective statement, one that has no potential for discussion. I don't care an enourmous amount about if someone likes a film. I care about why that person likes a film. And I think you're being a bit hypocritical. You've been in discussions before about films. The fact that you find this one to be above reproach hardly means that there's nothing to discuss.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry, I should've been more specific: I was referring to the discussion taking place earlier regarding the script's alleged materialistic outlook at the end of the movie and the way it affected the character of the Mcfly family.

I'm not saying it is a perfect movie, but I do find that particular discussion to be a banal and pointless pursuit, since it is not what the story is about at all.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There are films that have deeper meanings and hidden messages but sometimes you just gotta watch it for what it is.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.