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The Quick Question Thread


rpvee
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I remember an old article in British Film Magazine in 1978 written by reporter Derek Elley who interviews Williams and he talks of his career and recent works, among other things The Fury. Williams complements Brian DePalma's style and editing, says he had pretty much free hands with the score and that DePalma loves music and likes it to be in the forefront quite often. Also he adds that he had the good chance of recording the album for The Fury with the LSO before starting to work on The Superman, his next project.

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Oh and what does the three chord ascending phrase represent in Pirates of The Caribbean? It first showed up in Dead Man's Chest, and I wonder if it worked for the Pirates like the Rebel Fanfare does, or does it represent anything else?

It's usually played by horns and the chords are Dm-Bbmaj-Gmaj.

It's in Wheel Of Fortune (near the end), The Maelstrom battle, Guilty of being Innocent of being Jack Sparrow, and Palm Tree escape.

Could you type that in the Italian way (do-re-mi-fa-sol-la-si)?

Not sure how to do that. LOL.

I'm sorry, i didn't look at what you typed :D

I'm not sure, but i think it stands for Davy Jones.

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Haven't checked this thread in a while, so sorry to have note answered this question yet, Ethan. The reason Zimmer & Co. use D minor so much is because it's the saddest of all keys. Look for Lick My Love Pump: The Very Best of Hans Zimmer and Remote Control Productions, in stores soon.

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Weren't there rumors in the mid 1990s that Williams was going to retire? When specifically did that happen, and what was the source of the rumors?

He didn't retire, thank the maker! No idea who spread them around. Probably some young comer called Gold something-or-other, so he could get more oscar nominations!

But seriously...has anyone heard "Aurora"?

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Hey, $19.99 is a reasonable price for 2 discs! :)

Karol

Indeed! I almost feel sorry for the specialty labels for selling this stuff so cheap. Almost.
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Iknow that I have asked about this before, and I hate to harp on about it, but...is there, or is there not money in the 23rd/24th Centuries, in Star Trek?

In "Caretaker", Harry Kim nearly buys something from Quark, and in "VI", Scotty says ("that suits me) I just bought a boat".

In "IV", and "FC", however, it is stated that money does not exist (evolved sensibilities, etc.).

I understand that, even though The Federation may not deal in money, other other cultures probably do.

So...money, or no money?

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A

Iknow that I have asked about this before, and I hate to harp on about it, but...is there, or is there not money in the 23rd/24th Centuries, in Star Trek?

In "Caretaker", Harry Kim nearly buys something from Quark, and in "VI", Scotty says ("that suits me) I just bought a boat".

In "IV", and "FC", however, it is stated that money does not exist (evolved sensibilities, etc.).

I understand that, even though The Federation may not deal in money, other other cultures probably do.

So...money, or no money?

Are not Credits money in a different way as well?

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It's plausible that human culture in the Starfleet/Federation future no longer transacts physical currency with each other to make purchases. Look at Kirk's apartment in "II" and his collection of antiques. Did he steal them? Were they passed down from his ancestors? And what's to stop another citizen of Earth from making off with them in his absence?

Obviously they have some kind of credit or service system in place. Maybe they serve so many years in Starfleet or in a gainful occupation and get X number of credits per week that they can use towards physical curiosities, since at some point, at least in the 24th century, food and clothing can be replicated. But people still miss "real" food and beverage, not the simulated stuff, because if matter <--> conversion is flawless, then biological waste can be reconverted back into raw matter to fuel more replicators, as opposed to having to grow crops and slaughter livestock. Look at Picard's family, still working the vineyards as they had for generations. Were they doing it for free? Were the grapes just for show?

Harry's purchase is interspecies and we know that Ferengi don't subscribe to the noble Starfleet philosophy of no money. They charge and stockpile gold-pressed latinum. Maybe Starfleet personnel have some "money" that they need to barter with other alien species, but they are not supposed to hoard the credits they earn in order to build vast collections of stuff. They're supposed to be past that.

Why did Scotty "buy a boat" then? Maybe he bought it from an alien. Maybe it's just a 20th century slang phrase that wormed its way into the script. Maybe it's one of those lines that put a dagger in Gene Roddenberry's heart because it violated his philosophy of a money-less society.

It's a wonder that in the xenophobic Cold War-era 1960s, Star Trek wasn't shut down on the spot as a result of Roddenberry's communist philosophy of a peaceful future with no money, no want, and no need to stockpile possessions which runs counter to greedy capitalist business practices. Maybe John Lennon's song "Imagine" was just his way of summarizing a Star Trek episode. It's a beautiful dream but it'd never work on real life; that's what makes it science fiction.

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Possible but unlikely. When Jon Archer's Enterprise NX-01 encountered the Ferengi in 2151, they weren't named so it wasn't an official "first contact." The next "known" encounter was in 2355 when the Stargazer under Picard destroyed a rogue Ferengi vessel. "Official" first contact came nine years later at a derelict Tkon Empire site.

Could they have met around 2293, when the events of Star Trek: VI took place, and their race and its name simply remained unknown to Starfleet for another 60+ years? I guess. Anything is possible in the land of unfilmed Star Trek backstory, and it is likely that the Ferengi did make clandestine deals with humans without the Federation being aware.

While not canon, there is a Star Trek novel that explains why the Ferengi appear to be so militant towards the Federation when they encounter the Stargazer and so early on in TNG's first season. The Grand Nagus believed the moneyless Federation was insane and thus a military threat, and so wanted to appear strong in response. Unfortunately, nothing about the Ferengi was scary -- hence the return of the Romulans and thre creation of the Cardassians and Borg -- but fortunately they were rewritten to become the relatively harmless and greedy aliens we came to love on DS9.

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Gosh. I can not concentrate on counting today. Sorry I'm no help. Maybe tomorrow. It's definitely not an obvious 11/8 that's for sure.

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Please try!

A time signature lets you see how many beats are in a measure.

For example, if the time signature is 4/4, there are four beats* in one measure.

Here's an example (from 0:00 to 0:12):

[media=]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jcPsfXZT0p4

doom doom doom doom (1 2 3 4).

*Actually four fourth notes, but that does not really matter here.

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That depends on the tempo and the "amount and duration of notes" in the particular measure. The duration of one measure is never measured in seconds, it is measured in how many beats are in it.

But if you really want to know about the seconds, one 4/4 measure is e.g. 4 seconds long at tempo 60 (which means there are 60 quarter notes in one minute, hence one note per second) and 2 seconds long at tempo 120.

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Faleel still needs an answer (see above) but I have a font question:

Anyone know what the font is in the Star Wars: Special Edition 2 Disc sets are? The lettering for "A New Hope," "Music composed and conducted by John Williams" etc. I love that font and I had it years ago but now I can't find it...

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  • 2 weeks later...

Quick question: Could recommend some more movies in the vein of The Long Goodbye, Images and Close Encounters? I'm not talking about the plot or the situtations, but more referring as how they integrate the music not only in an extra-diegetic way but also making it part of the narrative and even the world of the film.

Any suggestions would be more than welcome.

Thanks in advance! :)

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The Red Violin, obviously. Branagh/Doyle's Dead Again. And The Legend of 1900, to a certain extent at least. Also Deception (the source of Korngold's cello concerto) and Hangover Square (the source of Herrmann's piano concerto), though I haven't seen those.

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The original Jaws LP is 100% a re-recording made at a later date by Williams with a different orchestra just for the soundtrack release.

The actual recordings used in the film were not released until 2000 by Decca

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Which doesn't make the original album any less "original", though. The fully developed version of the shark/cage fugue, for example, is the album version. Also, several other standard set pieces feel shortened on the actual score, so much that I wonder (does anyone know?) if Williams actually wrote the full album/concert cue first and then edited it for the film recording. But then, of course, it's missing some great music from the actual score.

A remastered release including both the album and the score is in order.

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No. He first wrote the film cues to fit the film. Then when it was determined there would be a soundtrack LP, he requested a re-recording to expand on the film cues as well as use a different, bigger orchestra

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It's a funny thing. As recorded for the film (and heard on the Decca release), the score really does sound like it was written based on the album arrangements at times.

A remastered release including both the album and the score is in order.

YES. I would buy that before you could say "dun-dun dun-dun". I'm not normally the hugest fan of OSTs being included in these expanded releases, but this is one case in which it would be absolutely essential to include both. Virtually all the music is already available, but when you consider how much room there is for improvement in the sound quality, it would be a very welcome addition to my collection. Here's to one of our favorite labels getting the rights and means to do this before too long.

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Yes an improved pass on Jaws would be more than welcome and also the fact that the original score and original soundtrack album are really different entities would make the inclusion of the OST in a 2 disc set much more sensible than in many cases where you get the same music in just slightly edited and shorter form on the 2nd disc. It is one of the reasons I like The Fury and Omen II: Damien expanded scores so much as they give you both worlds, the score as written for the film and then the pure album experience created just for the album and recorded separately as a new interpretation.

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Yes, and in both these cases, I nearly always go for the album version - because they're much better performances, and often also more fleshed out. And in both cases the missing material doesn't do that much for me.

With Jaws, the album recording is great, but the score is also very well performed and includes a lot of great stuff not on the album.

Simple rule: If the album was a separate recording, include both the score and the album in a re-release.

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