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The Official Intrada Thread


Trent B

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Don't know if I like that one yet, I ordered it because it's cheap. :D In my CD collection I've got Titanic (OST), Braveheart (OST + expansion), Willow, The Rocketeer (expansion), Legends of the Fall (OST), Swing Kids, and Living in the Age of Airplanes. I'm planning to check out The Wrath of Khan.

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3 minutes ago, Smeltington said:

So you just HAVE a lot of Horners, you don't LIKE them? Legends of the Fall is one of my favs, I hope you like that one at least.

 

The ones I've got in my CD collection I obviously like enough to purchase. :)

 

And I wouldn't call less than 10 albums a lot...

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4 minutes ago, Smeltington said:

So you just HAVE a lot of Horners, you don't LIKE them? Legends of the Fall is one of my favs, I hope you like that one at least.

He doesn't:

 

 

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On LP I just had Krull. But it contained only 6 tracks. So, I bought the expansion on CD and realised that the LP contained the best tracks already. But I don't listen to LPs anymore, so it's fine.

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I really got into some kind of Horner fever after listening to Aliens. So, I payed special attention to every Horner score in movies I saw. But all I ever heard was Aliens again and again. Patriot Games, Gorki Park...

3 minutes ago, Jurassic Shark said:

Are you implying you're not a hipster?

I never had the taste nor the talent. 

Nerd hits it better, I am afraid.

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12 minutes ago, GerateWohl said:

I really got into some kind of Horner fever after listening to Aliens. So, I payed special attention to every Horner score in movies I saw. But all I ever heard was Aliens again and again. Patriot Games, Gorki Park...

I never had the taste nor the talent. 

Nerd hits it better, I am afraid.

ALIENS is the most derivative, unoriginal drivel Horner ever composed.

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59 minutes ago, Jurassic Shark said:

Doesn't it add just about 15 minutes of mainly redundant material?

 

I dunno, but it does extend the piano piece, so for you, it's twice as good.

 

6 minutes ago, Jurassic Shark said:

@Smeltington, does one need taste or talent to be a hipster?

 

 

Taste, yes. But GerateWohl doesn't even listen to LPs.

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1 hour ago, bruce marshall said:

ALIENS is the most derivative, unoriginal drivel Horner ever composed.

I believe you. Some of the Horner scores I heard afterwards were from before Aliens.  But since I heard that one first,  it was my reference. 

You mentioned once Wolfen, which was probably one of his most original scores, that he derived from 50% of the material he did afterwards. But this is again that usual Horner discussion. 

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The last few posts on this thread should be moved to the garbage to a "I hate James Horner, do you?" thread.

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10 hours ago, GerateWohl said:

I own three Horner scores on CD and somehow I am fine with that. Krull, Aliens, Titanic.

Never felt the need to extend that collection.

 

Except for Krull extremely disposable. Horner's talents lay elsewhere.

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45 minutes ago, publicist said:

 

Except for Krull extremely disposable. Horner's talents lay elsewhere.

Maybe. But you have to focus somewhere. I followed Horner sometimes with more attention, sometimes with less since the 80s, but he didn't manage to really get me musically. Last time, that I thought, that might be something for my collection was A Beautiful Mind. But then I was so disappointed by Avatar. 

Call it a gut feeling, but for me Horner film music is that kind that pretends to be bigger than it actually is. I know, this is highly subjective. And there are other composers alike, that I actually enjoy being cheated by in that way and by others not. It is like it is.

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1 hour ago, Jurassic Shark said:

 

Tell that to @Thor! :D

He knows. 

But since Thor and I have opposite oppinions on almost any film score, why should Avatar be an exception?

 

Since I am not a journalist, I can affort to have a quite specific and limited taste in filmmusic. :)

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3 hours ago, publicist said:

So what you describe as 'bigger than it is' is really a reflection on commercial Hollywood movies of that era: streamlined, afraid of controversy, hungry for worldwide success (which mandated less and less rough edges, but an excess of audience-friendly sugarcoating). I love some his scores from that era, but i get sick when i hear them in combination with the movies they are associated with (the animation scores and the occasional Sneakers excepted).

 

Thanks a lot for that summary on Horner. Reflects to a good degree my vague impression.

 

My issue, in addition, a thought I had recently, when I explored Williams' score for The Eiger Sanction, where in even short cues with a dedicated theme for one particular scene Williams elaborated the track with numerous variations, playing around with it, modulations, changes of key and instruments or even ensembles. 

And then I listen to for example Aliens, and there are various cues that contain exactly one musical idea that does not change or vary, which is ok, if it fits to the scene. But then you hear that same cue with the exact same idea in varios other movies... Latest then I think, this is kind of lame.

 

 

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Mentally thumbing through my Horner collection, his drama scores are generally the ones I like least.

 

My horner favourites are Honey I Shrunk the KidsDeep ImpactThe Life Before Her Eyes, House of Sand and Fog, Apollo 13, Avatar and The Magnificent Seven (although Franglen is likely more responsible for that). Apart from Life Before... and House of..., the rest have some other element that gives them action or propulsion, or moving between storylines/locations enough to give some colour to the score.

 

I find that most of the time, when given material with long stretches of character material, there are maybe a handful of cues that showcase his themes and primary ideas, but the rest of it just either ends up being variations on that material, or into meandering territory.

 

I have 'handfuls' of cues from many Horner scores - far too many to list here. In each case, the full album is way too much and doesn't sustain interest, but there are perhaps 10-15 mins of highlights, either showcasing his themes, or just a handful of ideas that stuck out at me.

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I wonder, if Horner would fit well into todays superhero blockbuster landscape.

 

But if 30 years ago someone would have asked me the same about Danny Elfman and Alan Silvestry I would proabably have said, no, even though Elfman had there already done Batman. But that was a very cartoonish film compared to nowadays.

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5 hours ago, GerateWohl said:

Call it a gut feeling, but for me Horner film music is that kind that pretends to be bigger than it actually is.

 

Listen to Sneakers.

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1 hour ago, GerateWohl said:

I wonder, if Horner would fit well into todays superhero blockbuster landscape.

 

The writing was kind of on the wall that he wasn't going to.

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6 hours ago, publicist said:

 

Horner's career phases roughly went like this:

 

- 1980 - 1986: highly ambitious young whiz with excellent academic credentials who was hungry for diverse work

- 1986 - 1994: alignment towards more commercial fare and emotionally straightforward writing, with a beginning penchant for self-citation 

- 1994 - 2003: his most successful phase, where he cribbed himself and his temp tracks like there was no tomorrow and, last but not least, a slick, manipulative *fairy tale* style that treated even real-world narratives as if he were scoring myth (Titanic, Legends of the Fall, Braveheart, Apollo 13 and Perfect Storm attest to that), he must have been on to something, it's the period when many people fell in love with him

2003 - 2015: the comedown, with his over-emotive style being more and more out of sync with current trends, thus a return to less grandiose and showy approaches that only occasionally generated much interest

 

So what you describe as 'bigger than it is' is really a reflection on commercial Hollywood movies of that era: streamlined, afraid of controversy, hungry for worldwide success (which mandated less and less rough edges, but an excess of audience-friendly sugarcoating). I love some his scores from that era, but i get sick when i hear them in combination with the movies they are associated with (the animation scores and the occasional Sneakers excepted).

Makes me understand, why I am not a big fan of Horner. I should revisit his early works, I guess.

 

Can you sum up Elfman's career in the same way?

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I sneaked into some Horner scores now on Spotify and what caught my attention was Brainstorm (except for the parts, that sounded like Aliens), Cocoon and Apokalypto. But still no reason to extend my collection.

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11 minutes ago, GerateWohl said:

I sneaked into some Horner scores now on Spotify and what caught my attention was Brainstorm (except for the parts, that sounded like Aliens), Cocoon and Apokalypto. But still no reason to extend my collection.

 

My favourite Horner soundtrack is Swing Kids. Horner's music is not very interesting - I bought it for the great big band re-recordings.

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14 hours ago, Brundlefly said:

Can you sum up Elfman's career in the same way?

 

Not really, Elfman's repertoire of interest is much smaller. For him i might say that his ability grew a lot after the late 90's, but it didn't translate in a lot of good scores. I gave up on him after 'Corpse Bride', though Wolf Man, Alice in Wonderland and the concert works deserve honourable mentions.

 

 

 

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Update on Intrada from Roger Fiegelson on the final releases for 2021:

 

Most likely there will be three releases on Dec 7th and that will be it for the year. If it pans out, we'll have one expanded reissue, one release to a contemporary film by a popular composer, and a 4-CD set -- a reissue of sorts, but now with more music plus the LP recording as well. Also part of the score was in split mono before and now thanks to new elements will be in true stereo.
 

http://www.intrada.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=4&t=8805

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1 hour ago, Amer said:

 and a 4-CD set -- a reissue of sorts, but now with more music plus the LP recording as well. Also part of the score was in split mono before and now thanks to new elements will be in true stereo.

Could this one be Masada perhaps?

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Ok20210928_113125.jpg

2 hours ago, Grace Under Pressure said:

Contemporary film.....

 

Powell Solo?

 

Or Zimmer from the composers in the previously mentioned list...

?????

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For the contemporary film Solo would be the best possiblity

Another fav would be Cruella although I think Disney Records would more likely it. Bu ad they haven't done it yet why not?

And finally it could be Free Guy which as still no release if I recall correctly

All that for the Disney related I'm sure there's lot of other stuff

 

For the 4-CD set I cross my fingers for a reissue of Tom Sawyer and for the expansion well The Patriot is on the top of my wish

 

In any case I can't wait to discover their surprises!

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