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What Is The Last Film You Watched?


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Wow Alex, I didn't intend for you to take my comments so personally. I'm sorry if I inadvertently made you angry. Sorry man, it's just harmless banter, you know? I'll try to remember that you can be quite touchy, in the future ROTFLMAO

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I don't think I took your very personal attacks that personal, Quint, but yes, I'm not insensitive. I'm not Sam Quint of Colonel Miles Quaritch. I mean, how can I be insensitive when I have to constantly open myself to music and film?

Alex

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Honestly Alex, I never get "very personal" towards someone on the internet (I admittedly did a couple of times in my internet 'newbie' first year), although I can see how a sensitive soul could sometimes percieve my tone as being a tad personal, especially considering the faceless exchange inherent to online discussion. Truth is though, me getting personal on someone would be quite a contrast to the light tone in which I speak here. I think Morlock gets where I'm coming from, as do others like Blum, Charlie, Skywalker, Steef, Joey, Wojo, Koray, Mark Olivarez and even the endlessly loveable KM - they 'get' the banter which we all engage in. I'm here for fun and because I like the company and I don't want to upset you, or anyone else for that matter, but like I just said, I'll try to take your sensitivity into consideration in future debates.

Note to self: remember the feelings of the sensitive crowd.

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Doesn't he spell it Dawg?

Attended a screening of Atom Egoyan's The Sweet Hereafter (1997), which preceded by a Q&A with the book's author, Russell Banks (and, strangly, Paul Auster). It's a tremendous film. It's interesting that both this and The Ice Storm came out the same year, as there are so many similarities. That being said, I never connected with that film, while this one I find to be absolutely devastating. It's breathtakingly beautiful filmmaking, and storytelling.

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Everyone likes a good discussion, but thankfully only a few like to revel in their own 'insightful' juices. Of course, insightful to some is BS to others ;). The winner matters not in such settings.

:beerchug:

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Attended a screening of Atom Egoyan's The Sweet Hereafter (1997), which preceded by a Q&A with the book's author, Russell Banks (and, strangly, Paul Auster). It's a tremendous film. It's interesting that both this and The Ice Storm came out the same year, as there are so many similarities. That being said, I never connected with that film, while this one I find to be absolutely devastating. It's breathtakingly beautiful filmmaking, and storytelling.

Two different films. I did not really connect to either of them but I easily choose The Ice Storm over The Sweet Hereafter because the former doesn't point out the drama so much. The atmosphere in Egoyan's film is so heavy and sombre that its drama started to have an opposite effect on me. I've never seen one of his other movies but, except for The Sweet Hereafter, they are generally not that well-received. I never even heard of them. Anyway, what I'm trying to say is, based on what I saw in The Sweet Hereafter, I doubt he's my kind of director.

Alex

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I dunno- both films made in the same year, same composer, pervaisive cold outside, children die, affairs abound. Not similar films, but with many similarities.

I felt that Lee's film was less focused, less controlled, and more heavy handed, as well as being unconvincing as a period piece.

What do you mean by 'point out the drama'?

Saw The Imaginorium of Doctor Parnassus (2009). Very nice. It's telling when comparing this film to Burton's latest- director with similar reputations, doing material that sounds like it's their forte. Gilliam does it with grace, ease and wit, while Burton falls flat on his ass. It's imaginative, but not insistant about it. The narrative gets lost at points, but it doesn't really matter. It's an exciting and fresh movie.

Ledger is good, and his three replacements work rather well in context (Depp being the least effective, surprisingly). Tom Waits as the Devil is every bit as delicious as the concept sounded. Standout for me, though, was Andrew Garfield, who really helped me buy into Plummer's character, and was really the human center of the piece. Nice to see Verne Troyer get a different kind of role, too.

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I felt that Lee's film was less focused, less controlled, and more heavy handed, as well as being unconvincing as a period piece.

I understand why you say Lee's film was less focused because it wasn't clear where the film was going to, but I think more viewings might be very illuminating. After all, The Ice Storm is mainly a social study, more than anything else.

What do you mean by 'point out the drama'?

I felt the maker of The Sweet Hereafter was pushing a little bit too hard to make us feel the drama and graveness of it all. Everything about this movie was mourning. I had a problem with that because nothing in the world is fully 'yan' or fully 'ying'.

Alex

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In this film, the whole point is how lives and communities are irreporably torn apart by tragedy. And the film shows the complete portrait, by showing both the before and after. There is great beauty and great potential for goodness in the film. But when a tragedy hits a community, particularly in such an overwhelming fashion, there is no Yang. It's a very moral film, in showing consequence. And every scene in it has at least two or three layers beneath the surface- Everything is what it is, yet more. I get such a strong sense of past and present in the film. On top of which, I think there is a great mystery in the film that is never made explicit, but further enhances each viewing (regarding Ian Holm's character).

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In this film, the whole point is how lives and communities are irreporably torn apart by tragedy. And the film shows the complete portrait, by showing both the before and after. There is great beauty and great potential for goodness in the film. But when a tragedy hits a community, particularly in such an overwhelming fashion, there is no Yang. It's a very moral film, in showing consequence. And every scene in it has at least two or three layers beneath the surface- Everything is what it is, yet more. I get such a strong sense of past and present in the film. On top of which, I think there is a great mystery in the film that is never made explicit, but further enhances each viewing (regarding Ian Holm's character).

I felt the tone started with 'yang' and that the film never departed from it. Maybe I simply missed or overlooked the 'yin'. We all watch movies from our own perspective.

Regardless of the execution or the result, doesn't the story itself strike you as a TV movie?

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Yeah, but that can be said of a great deal of dramas. I don't think it says anything about the quality of the story.

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Hellraiser 6: Hellseeker

I was really bored with this at first, but then it started to get really creepy in a surrealistic way. I was disappointed that Ashley Laurence wasn't in it that much. Bad production values, but good to kill time. Time to play.

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I dunno- both films made in the same year, same composer, pervaisive cold outside, children die, affairs abound. Not similar films, but with many similarities.

I felt that Lee's film was less focused, less controlled, and more heavy handed, as well as being unconvincing as a period piece.

What do you mean by 'point out the drama'?

Saw The Imaginorium of Doctor Parnassus (2009). Very nice. It's telling when comparing this film to Burton's latest- director with similar reputations, doing material that sounds like it's their forte. Gilliam does it with grace, ease and wit, while Burton falls flat on his ass. It's imaginative, but not insistant about it. The narrative gets lost at points, but it doesn't really matter. It's an exciting and fresh movie.

Ledger is good, and his three replacements work rather well in context (Depp being the least effective, surprisingly). Tom Waits as the Devil is every bit as delicious as the concept sounded. Standout for me, though, was Andrew Garfield, who really helped me buy into Plummer's character, and was really the human center of the piece. Nice to see Verne Troyer get a different kind of role, too.

Hear, hear, Morlock! "IODP" was my fave "new" film of last year. It reminded me (visually, at least) of "Brazil", and "The Crimson Permanent Assurance". Other than that, I can't say anything about it - your mini-review said it all!

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Hellraiser 6: Hellseeker

I was really bored with this at first, but then it started to get really creepy in a surrealistic way. I was disappointed that Ashley Laurence wasn't in it that much. Bad production values, but good to kill time. Time to play.

They still make Hellraiser movies? And people still want to watch them?!

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Hellraiser 6: Hellseeker

I was really bored with this at first, but then it started to get really creepy in a surrealistic way. I was disappointed that Ashley Laurence wasn't in it that much. Bad production values, but good to kill time. Time to play.

Sounds like the sort of shite I'd watch late on a Saturday night.

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Hellraiser 6: Hellseeker

I was really bored with this at first, but then it started to get really creepy in a surrealistic way. I was disappointed that Ashley Laurence wasn't in it that much. Bad production values, but good to kill time. Time to play.

They still make Hellraiser movies? And people still want to watch them?!

They stopped with Hellraiser 8: Hellworld, but now they're re-booting it.

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It was impressive. More than the visuals, though, I loved the central performance.

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It was impressive. More than the visuals, though, I loved the central performance.

Indeed, I've rarely seen a more natural relationship between an adult and a child in film.

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The Fall: Very impressive. This is from the same man who made The Cell?! Wow!

"Impressive" is a good term. I've never seen The Cell, but this made me want to.

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Memoirs Of A Geisha: Charming film. I didn't know that Steven Spielberg produced it but during the film I was reminded of Spielberg all the time. To be more precise, it reminded me of the '80s Spielberg, when he made The Color Purple and Empire Of The Sun, although this one is more light and fluffy in tone (the quick pacing, the constant music, I didn't feel the element of 'time passing'). The beautiful cinematography resembled the work of Allen Daviau.

Alex

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I saw it in the cinema and I like it a lot .And a rare instance where a Williams score was mixed properly in the past 10 years

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Forgot to mention I saw City Island last week.

I had never heard of it until then, and decided to stick around after work and see it with a couple friends. I thought it was pretty good. A guess it's your typical dysfunctional family, but Andy Garcia was great.

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Memoirs Of A Geisha: Charming film. I didn't know that Steven Spielberg produced it but during the film I was reminded of Spielberg all the time. To be more precise, it reminded me of the '80s Spielberg, when he made The Color Purple and Empire Of The Sun, although this one is more light and fluffy in tone (the quick pacing, the constant music, I didn't feel the element of 'time passing'). The beautiful cinematography resembled the work of Allen Daviau.

Alex

Its flaws are evident, but it is a charming film, as you put it, and it feels very sincere and it is indeed gorgeous to look at and JW's music is given a stellar role. I enjoyed it very much

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I would describe it as charming as well. My favorite character is the bad girl geisha. She was great.

And probably the most beautiful of all geishas.

Alex

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King Arthur (2004)

Better then it has any right to be. The script only pays lipservice to the Arturian legends, and is more concerned of connecting itself with Braveheart and Gladiator. But It's competently acted by a cast of well-chosen actors, the direction by Antoine Fuqua is not as in your face as most Bruckheimer films, and the pacing and editing is rather deliberate. Even Zimmer's score is less annoying then usual.

Not a good film, but watchable TV fare.

Lancelot_from_King_Arthur_2004.png

Lancelot (Ioan Gruffudd) with a 5th century sword held together by a 20th century hex head screw.

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I don't think it ever really got passed the language barrier, though. At almost every point, I was asking myself why on earth they're all speaking English, giving less expressive performances than they usually do.

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Iron Man 2, it's a good movie, worthy of a B, but see it at matinee prices

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I disagree. Might be enjoyable under the right circumstances, but a good movie it's not.

Dude, this is an American movie, so they speak English!

That sort of thing rarely bothers me.

It rarely bothers me as well. The problem I think is that I'm familiar with so many if these actors acting in their native language, and they seemed to be held back. It's not a problem when English is the actors native language.

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Gotcha! Silly film, but it's sure fun seeing my campus the way it looked in the 80s...and boy, is it amusing to watch the characters run into a building on one side of campus and emerge from another building on the other side in the next shot. :)

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Superbad: Not as funny as peeps say but better than Zach And Miri Make A Porn, for instance. No, The 40 Year Old Virgin and Knocked Up are not only better movies, they're funnier too.

King Arthur (2004)

The script only pays lipservice to the Arturian legends, and is more concerned of connecting itself with Braveheart and Gladiator.

I get the same uneasy feeling when I watch the Robin Hood trailers. (shiver)

“We make movies and we try to sell them. There’s no other way around it. To say it’s all about pure art is nonsense; it’s about how do you sell your movie. I don’t care if it’s a high budget or a low budget movie, if I don’t sell it there’s no point in making it.” -Ridley Scott

Alex

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