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Adventures On Earth - VSL Mock Up


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The thing that I don't get is, why put all this enormous amounts of energy into a mock-up? What musician or composer would do that?

It's called marketing.

It sounds OK. People are always impressed by VSL, but it's not really that great in my opinion. I would never use it for the bulk of the orchestra - the way it's recorded just can't match the sound of instruments recorded in a proper orchestral acoustic environment. EWQL SO is pretty great for this, although some of the brass sounds a bit dodgy and fake. But if you know the library well, it's easy to find the right patches to get the sound you're looking for. Project SAM sample libraries are great too. Especially Symphobia, which is amazing for brass and strings. With a Todd AO Scoring stage reverb patch loaded into Altiverb and some mastering tweaks in iZotope Ozone for finishing touches!

I'm tempted to do a few Williams demos with EWQL and Project SAM (and maybe VSL here and there) to show what kind of results one can achieve if sample libraries are mixed together. Would be a fun little task and a great opportunity to study Williams' scores and learn more about some of his masterful works.

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The thing that I don't get is, why put all this enormous amounts of energy into a mock-up? What musician or composer would do that?

One who can't afford to hire an orchestra. With this software a young composer could compose a realistic-sounding orchestral score for a movie without having to hire the orchestra. It's an amazing tool. It will never replace the real orchestra (how could you give live concerts with this stuff?) but it's an amazing set of sounds for a young composer to use.

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The thing that I don't get is, why put all this enormous amounts of energy into a mock-up? What musician or composer would do that?

One who can't afford to hire an orchestra. With this software a young composer could compose a realistic-sounding orchestral score for a movie without having to hire the orchestra. It's an amazing tool. It will never replace the real orchestra (how could you give live concerts with this stuff?) but it's an amazing set of sounds for a young composer to use.

What I mean is, why not put the same time and energy into your own music? What is there to be gained by meticulously copying an existing work (someone else's music) with sampled instruments? More importantly, what is the motivation behind it? You're never going to beat the real thing so what's the point?

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I think it's to demonstrate the power and realism of the software, and using pieces that people know and recognise can give them a point of reference. Original music wouldn't be as effective in showing the capabilities as there's no "real" recordings to compare it to.

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What I mean is, why not put the same time and energy into your own music? What is there to be gained by meticulously copying an existing work (someone else's music) with sampled instruments? More importantly, what is the motivation behind it? You're never going to beat the real thing so what's the point?

It's the law of relativity in motion, Alex. Humans must do something, to partake of a relative existence, It's in their nature as automatons. The motivation is primed by the maker.

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I think it's to demonstrate the power and realism of the software, and using pieces that people know and recognise can give them a point of reference. Original music wouldn't be as effective in showing the capabilities as there's no "real" recordings to compare it to.

That would explain the commercial motivation but I'm talking about the people who do this sort of thing all the time and without getting paid for it.

What I mean is, why not put the same time and energy into your own music? What is there to be gained by meticulously copying an existing work (someone else's music) with sampled instruments? More importantly, what is the motivation behind it? You're never going to beat the real thing so what's the point?

It's the law of relativity in motion, Alex. Humans must do something, to partake of a relative existence, It's in their nature as automatons. The motivation is primed by the maker.

Well, that could explain it. It's just that it takes a lot of time and expertise to convincingly copy an orchestral piece with samples. If it isn't for demonstrative purposes, then it's a waste of energy. It would have an added value if the music didn't exist before or if music can only exist because of samples.

Alex

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Well for the first time I can hear what samples can really do .If I didn't know I might have thought it was a real recording

So, lets say this program was really cheap and I had enough musical knowledge to reconstruct pieces from sheet music I'd buy it to make a mock up of " Celebration Fanfare" which has never been recorded

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That's a fantastic job, but it was always going to suffer from JW's odd arrangement decisions no matter what. Adventures on Earth is one of those cues that builds the listener's emotional expectations up only to let them down just as the music is about to soar, so to speak. A bit like Shore's The Fields of the Pelennor.

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Hey, this is great! I've always tinkered around with MIDI and programs like Cakewalk, but since I play one-fingered piano, it was always easier (honestly) to program each note into the computer one at a time. That grew tiresome after a few years, and then I discovered sound fonts, and was able to convert a few MIDIs into quasi-decent sounding audio files.

This is unlike any synthesized music I've ever heard before. It's like sound fonts on steroids.

This would have value for people on a low budget, who want to compose and record their own music, but can't afford to hire a band or orchestra to perform it. And for those who feel they might spend a lot of time tinkering around with the music on the fly, which gets expensive with so many musicians and technicians all on the clock. Low budget video games and movies could use this, not to mention amateur bands who want to record something like Metallica's S&M album, which requires a backup orchestra.

As far as demos go, you need to compare it against something "real" so we hear how good it is. It doesn't sound as good as "real" people playing instruments. But it sounds damn good anyways.

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I think it's to demonstrate the power and realism of the software, and using pieces that people know and recognise can give them a point of reference. Original music wouldn't be as effective in showing the capabilities as there's no "real" recordings to compare it to.

That would explain the commercial motivation but I'm talking about the people who do this sort of thing all the time and without getting paid for it.

Personally I have spent some hours notating full scores into Sibelius, particularly when I first bought the software. It was a great way for me to not only get to know the program, but as a music student to also intimately examine orchestration. Williams' scores in particular were very illuminating. I'm sure there are more traditional ways of studying orchestration, but I found it a very rewarding, "hands-on" experience.

I would imagine these samples are just a further step from what I have been doing, in translating the notes to realistic and vibrant sounds.

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The thing that I don't get is, why put all this enormous amounts of energy into a mock-up? What musician or composer would do that?

One who can't afford to hire an orchestra. With this software a young composer could compose a realistic-sounding orchestral score for a movie without having to hire the orchestra. It's an amazing tool. It will never replace the real orchestra (how could you give live concerts with this stuff?) but it's an amazing set of sounds for a young composer to use.

What I mean is, why not put the same time and energy into your own music? What is there to be gained by meticulously copying an existing work (someone else's music) with sampled instruments? More importantly, what is the motivation behind it? You're never going to beat the real thing so what's the point?

I had assumed this was produced by the software company (and therefore whoever made the mock-up got paid to do it). If it's just made by a fan then I see your point.

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its very good compared by what we usually hear. but some instruments are still too synthy. the trumpets for example.

There are several other instruments that may be unnoticeable from real ones.

I can see this working rather seamless for example using real trumpets and violins while the rest is samples.

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