Jump to content

LOST - the music


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 872
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Giacchino was on fire when he was writing Lost. It has some of the best musical writing in television and he handles all the thematic material beautifully. Great scoring.

You have a valid point Mark, but I'm looking at this from the perspective that music doesn't have to be pressed on a CD any more to be heard and that it's getting easier to make custom playlists, so we focus just on what we do want.

TV scores give us an unfortunate situation. You have upwards of 10 hours of music written for just one season, and yet most of the time, 95% of that will never see the light of day. We have no automatic right to hear it, and given how time pressured TV scoring it, maybe the composer doesn't want it released as they don't feel it represents their talent.

However, I believe a composer should be able to pick the moments he wants to release from his work, and not have to worry about the label can't pay the union the extravagant upfront fees it demands. What I'm hearing in this thread is that Varese is trying to keep costs low, and that's having noticeable creative limitations (if they're not just some strange choices by Giacchino of course).

I believe LE releases are charged per unit. Why the hell can't regular releases do that too? I know the union is concerned about reduced income, but I'd argue that it just makes the whole business much more fair - the union is paid for what sells.

Well I believe the special fees are for older scores. Even with that Varese still managed a 70+ minute disc. Then you're asking for Giacchino and his music editor to select 70 minutes, out of all those hours, for a CD.

Of course that now begs the question when it comes to music, who knows more about making a CD? The composer and his music editor or the fan?

Link to post
Share on other sites

From http://www.varesesar...de.com/News.asp

A LOST FAREWELL!

Date: 5/8/2010 Composer Michael Giacchino saw six historic years of work on the ABC series LOST come to an end with one final set of recording sessions on May 7, 2010 on the Warner Bros. scoring stage in Burbank. Giacchino was joined by LOST producers Damon Lindelof, Carlton Cuse and Bryan Burk, actress Evangeline Lilly, Varèse Sarabande’s Robert Townson and the entire LOST orchestra and recording team, for an emotional farewell to the landmark show that will broadcast its final episode on May 23. Varèse Sarabande’s LOST: Season 5 album has just been released. CONGRATULATIONS MICHAEL!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Of course that now begs the question when it comes to music, who knows more about making a CD? The composer and his music editor or the fan?

Obviously the fan!

;)

In this case, though, it's probably true. It seems pretty obvious that the album would fare better with more new season 5 music rather than the 'tracked' bits.

Link to post
Share on other sites

From http://www.varesesar...de.com/News.asp

A LOST FAREWELL!

Date: 5/8/2010 Composer Michael Giacchino saw six historic years of work on the ABC series LOST come to an end with one final set of recording sessions on May 7, 2010 on the Warner Bros. scoring stage in Burbank. Giacchino was joined by LOST producers Damon Lindelof, Carlton Cuse and Bryan Burk, actress Evangeline Lilly, Varèse Sarabande’s Robert Townson and the entire LOST orchestra and recording team, for an emotional farewell to the landmark show that will broadcast its final episode on May 23. Varèse Sarabande’s LOST: Season 5 album has just been released. CONGRATULATIONS MICHAEL!

It's the end of an era... ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I could never have imagined that one day I would have feel such sorrow for a TV show ending, really. But Lost has never been "just" a TV show.

Last week episode was probably a hint at how emotional things will be in the last few episodes. It's not so easy to say goodbye to these characters.

Maybe Lost is saying to us that it's our turn to "let it go"...

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah...I'm actually not having quite as tough a time with it as I expected, but I'm sure once the show's over and it actually sinks in, I'll realize what has really happened. I mean, heck, I just finished watching Prison Break, which wasn't even that good after the first season, and I'm feeling it even with that. There's something sad about knowing you'll never see a certain group of characters interact a certain way again. It's the same reason why major deaths on shows are emotionally powerful - you know there was no real death, but you know you're not going to be seeing that character much any more, and that's very real. (Unless it's a show like LOST, of course. ;))

Link to post
Share on other sites

Pretty soon I won't have any TV shows to watch. I seriously think Lost has spoiled TV for me. Quite a few long running shows have ended and I tire of the CSI/NCIS/whatever that follow the same formula every week.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, it's going to be weird having LOST and 24 both end this year. Hopefully Heroes will also be allowed to die a (slightly) dignified death now, and I don't have much hope for The Office getting truly better again, and I've stopped watching CSI, and Flashforward failed to captivate me...I don't know what I'll do!

Well, for the time being, I'll make do with rewatching old seasons of 24 on Netflix Instant Watch, as well as all the episodes of The X-Files, too. Haven't seen a lot of those.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I too think I haven't enough strength to endorse another TV show after Lost. Never been a fan of procedural dramas like NCIS/CSI/Law & Order stuff. I like to watch House MD with my girlfriend sometimes, but I don't see it regularly.

However, I've just began to watch The Wire, as my brother gifted me with the Complete Series DVD boxset for my birthday last February. I only saw Season 1 so far and this show grabbed me, it's really amazing imho. But seeing a TV series on DVD is a different kind of enjoyment than watching it regularly on a weekly basis (and without several monhts hiatus between seasons). It's more like reading a huge novel, especially with a series like The Wire.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Currently running shows I'd recommend to fill in the gap LOST will leave:

Breaking Bad

Fringe

Big Love

No longer airing new episodes, but worth checking out on DVD shows I'd recommend:

Carnivale

Battlestar Galactica

Dollhouse

Alias

Pushing Daisies

The Sopranos

Six Feet Under

The Shield

Link to post
Share on other sites

hmm, in the comedy world, currently airing shows I recommend are:

It's Always Sunny In Philadelphia

Parks and Recreation

South Park

The Office

30 Rock

Community

How I Met Your Mother

Better Off Ted (unknown if renewed or not)

No longer airing, but can rent on DVD:

Arrested Development

Scrubs

The State

Newsradio

Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried Alias but got a little weary of it in the second season and never bothered finishing. I need to watch The Sopranos eventually, and Fringe looks good to me.

Oh, I forgot that I'll still have Dexter once that comes back for the next season. I hope they do a good job with it...after last season's finale, they could really do some stellar or not-so-stellar things. But the show's generally kept a pretty high level of quality, so I have hope.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I tried Alias but got a little weary of it in the second season and never bothered finishing. I need to watch The Sopranos eventually, and Fringe looks good to me.

Hmmm, you probably won't get much more out of it then. For me, the show was never as good again as it was in its first season and first half of the second. Though it was starting to get pretty great again in the 5th season.

Oh, I forgot that I'll still have Dexter once that comes back for the next season. I hope they do a good job with it...after last season's finale, they could really do some stellar or not-so-stellar things. But the show's generally kept a pretty high level of quality, so I have hope.

Yea I'd really like to find time to check out Dexter.

But we're way off topic now lol. This discussion belongs in this thread ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes indeed. :sleepy:

Three more days until Michael Giacchino conducts the music of LOST at a building I'm going to walk by in just a few minutes! Oh goodness, I cannot miss this. =/ Several friends who are similarly LOST-obsessed (though not as interested in the music) want to camp out with me till the box office opens. Even if we can't get in (;)), we're hoping to catch glimpses of Giacchino and/or the actors at some point. Not sure where the performer entrance is, but I've certainly seen every side of the building plenty of times, so I have some ideas of where to look. :sleepy:

Link to post
Share on other sites

There will probably never be another LOST for me, meaning there won't be another TV show that I'll get as invested and wrapped up in. That isn't to say that I won't still watch TV after the show is over, I have a few other shows that I watch regularly (mostly ones from Jason's comedy list).

Link to post
Share on other sites

it's also rare that I watch a show every week. I watch Heroes out of habit . I tried to watch Battlestar Galactica,Fringe ,V a few times but couldn't get into it enough to watch every week.

i did start to watch Invasion a few years ago but it got cancelled

Link to post
Share on other sites

Invasion and Surface were 2 shows that quickly spawned after the high praise and success LOST was getting. They seemed more like, "Hey check it out, we have cliffhangers too!" than actual quality TV.

I'm with Red, in that I probably will never be so enveloped in another show again (At least until Lindelof and Cuse team up again for something else!). I've been with this show since Day 1. Haven't missed a single episode, watched them all when they aired, aside from a couple this season, which I watched slightly after they started to skip commercials.

It's the only show I watched religiously, so when it ends, that's it for me. I don't watch TV that much anymore.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Invasion and Surface were 2 shows that quickly spawned after the high praise and success LOST was getting. They seemed more like, "Hey check it out, we have cliffhangers too!" than actual quality TV.

Same with Threshhold. They were all LOST clones, all premiered the fall after LOST did, and all got canceled before getting a second season. I liked them all, Threshhold especially was getting really good by the last 2 episodes (which never aired in the US)

Miracles was decent too. Oh, and The Inside. Seems like every show I enjoy doesn't get renewed ;)

Link to post
Share on other sites

I watched Lost mostly faithfully in the first and second season, but started to lose interest in season 3.

Just like I watched 24 faithfully -- even at the expense of personal relationships -- from season five or so through last season. This season? Lost interest just like that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Yea, LOST was starting to get pretty bad early on in Season 3... however, the end of Season 3 more than made up for it, and Seasons 4-6 have been the best yet

I watched 24 faithfully from Day 1 all the way through Season probably 5... Season 6 was when episodes would pile up on my dvr and I'd knock them out in chunks... then I never bothered to watch Redemption or Season 7 or 8.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh right. Well also starting with Season 4, they air from Feb-May with no repeats (or sometimes 1 week off) instead of Sep-May with many repeats. Seasons 4-6 are also 14-18 episodes long each.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a heads up--Giacchino has a feature profile in this week's issue of The New Yorker, written by their music critic Alex Ross (author of the Pulitzer Prize-nominated history of 20th century music The Rest is Noise).

Thanks for pointing this! I love Ross, he's a wonderful music critic. Both the podcast and the video are very interesting.

I found another very lovely Giacchino tidbit at the New Yorker: he's actually giving a party to the whole orchestra after the last LOST session.

How cool is that?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll put the quote in here since it's worth reading.

A lot of times musicians are treated really badly in this business. They’re generally not invited to premières, or even to cast-and-crew parties. And you don’t see their names in the end credits. It’s pretty much the only job on the crew where you gotta practice twenty or thirty years to be able to do what they do. Yet so many other people get to see their names up there, including, you know, the guy who brings the doughnuts. Not to diminish the guy who brings the doughnuts! We like him, too! But the musicians are a huge part of what makes a movie work. I always tell them, “Listen, I can put all these black markings on this page, but without you guys all I’ve done is mess up a piece of nice white paper.” So I try to make them feel appreciated. And we try to have fun doing what we do. I want this to be as fun as when I was ten years old, when “Star Wars” had come out and I was playing those LPs all the time and I’d decided I wanted to make movies for a living.

Stand-up guy, that Giacchino.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Very classy. Kudos to him for giving the orchestra credit...when you really think about it, it truly is amazing how they have to be the very best in their difficult fields to even have a chance at participating, yet all you'll see at most in the credits is the name of the group.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Indeed! I found this breakdown of themes on FSM:

Episode 15

Wonderful. That's the word I would use to describe the music. A prequel to Ab Aeterno, the episode is centered around 3 themes: Jacob's theme, the Man in Black theme (introduced in Ab Aeterno), and a cousin (or, one might say, mother) of Jacob's theme in what I will call the Cave Theme. Of the three, the one that strangely has the least impact on the episode is Jacob's theme, though this makes sense, as storywise, the Jacob portrayed here is the least interesting of the three characters.

The Man in Black Theme, which in Ab Aeterno, seemed to simply be a villainous theme, is here anything but. Giacchino's use of it ranges from mysterious to heroic to tragic (the piano rendition near the end is probably the best use of the "Lost piano" this season, about equal to the first time we hear Ben's theme like that), and finally to darkly villainous. The Man in Black is proving to be an extremely deep character, and the conflict does not seem to simply be good vs. evil, as the people in the Temple would like us to think. Giacchino's music reflects this perfectly, and every time the Man in Black's theme was played, whether on solo low strings or by full orchestra, I found myself completely engrossed by the music.

Unbelievably, that theme is not even the best theme in the episode! That honor goes to the Cave Theme (also perhaps the Mother theme), based seemingly on similar chords as Jacob's theme, but going in a different direction. It too is mysterious in that grand, religious manner as Jacob's theme is. There are points where it sounds mysterious, points where it sounds like a theme for Eden, and points where it sounds like anything but. I was wondering when Giacchino would give us a truly memorable new theme in these past few episodes, and he does not disappoint.

This episode, like Ab Aeterno, is scored basically like a 45 minute long film, and it is that which allows Giacchino to really develop all three of his themes to their fullest extent. Of course, there was some non-theme related material that is very good as well, such as the afore-mentioned boar chase, but it was remarkable how much of the episode was basically Variations on the 3 Themes. Any doubt I had for what Giacchino would do for the finale is erased. I don't know if the show's going to deliver a satisfactory conclusion for me, but I know the music will.

Link to post
Share on other sites

From http://popwatch.ew.c...kageID=20313460

'Lost' Soundtrack Live!: Michael Giacchino, you are a god

by Darren Franich Categories: Lost, Music, News, Things That Are Awesome! Some elements of Lost will always be controversial, even among the most die-hard fans. We'll spend an eternity quibbling over which season was the best, which character's death was the most emotionally traumatizing, and who had the wackiest flashback plotline. (IMHO: Season four, Mr. Eko, and Richard "The Count of Monte Cristo" Alpert.) But there's one thing we can all agree on: the musical score by Michael Giacchino has never been less than incredible. Giacchino deserves his own private island as reward for services rendered to humanity, but this is a good start: Variety reports that, on May 13, the composer will be holding a Lost concert at UCLA.

During Lost's run, Giacchino's gone from being "that guy who scored Alias and Medal of Honor" to Pixar's go-to composer — he even won the Oscar for Up. Has anyone ever deserved success more? Giacchino's eclectic sonic stylings gave Lost a truly distinctive vibe, as surely as John Williams gave the Star Wars movies an injection of mythic grandeur.

I think it's fair to say that Giacchino's music has even carried the show over some rough patches. Remember the infamous Hydra subplot in season 3? While the show's creators were wrestling with how to move the plot forward, Giacchino's music was swelling with new and wonderfully bizarre twists. (I especially loved the jazzy horn section that came to define the Others, with its slight nod toward Jerry Goldsmith's Planet of the Apes score.)

Giacchino's done a beautiful job of incorporating running themes and tweaking them over the years. Consider "Credit Where Credit is Due", which played over the pilot episode's credits sequence, and plays throughout the series during emotional moments. You can hear twisted echoes of it in "Jack's Swan Song," a mournfully weird track that played during the apocalyptic season 5 finale. (If those two tracks were movies, they'd be The Godfather and The Godfather: Part II.)

My helplessly geeky question to you is: which recurring Lost theme is your favorite? My first instinct is to nominate "Hollywood and Vines" (a.k.a., "The Adventure Song"), which I invariably find myself humming at random intervals during the day. However, as was proven yet again by the Desmond-centric episode last month, the Desmond-and-Penny love theme (best used in "The Constant") is brings me to tears every time I hear it.

Which Lost themes do you like, PopWatchers? And don't you wish more TV shows had their own distinctive musical scores? Wouldn't NCIS: L.A. go down a whole lot easier with some trombones mixed in?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it will be a night to remember to those who get to attend. The videoclips are tantalizing. Temple theme and all. :P

It would be cool to be there.

They should include the concert on the season 6 DVD and Blu-Ray.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not going to watch the videos yet - I'm still hoping to get in - but thank you for posting them! I'll be sure to watch 'em after the event.

I keep fingers crossed that you have a good luck so you can get in. I think we all would appreciate a report from the event! Here's to hoping! :)

Link to post
Share on other sites
Episode 16

After last week's strange episode, it's back to basics this week as the writers deliver a very good penultimate episode to both the season and series. In the tradition of episodes like Exodus or Greatest Hits, this episode perfectly sets up the finale for something huge to go down, and the forward momentum is evident from the very first scene.

Giacchino's score is less epic than in Across the Sea, which I think might be one of his finest overall scores for the entire series, but is no less effective. As we approach the end of the series, he has to do an amazing juggling act with all of the themes he has written, and the score for this episode has more of a needledrop approach than a through-scored approach: insert Locke's theme here, Widmore's theme here, Ben's theme here, etc. Credit has to go to Michael because despite this approach, the score still sounds organic, and is allowed a couple great moments.

I was surprised by how effective the return of the main theme's original arrangement, almost note for note from "Credit where credit is due", was, and how it really tied everything together well. The theme's return, first on piano and then on strings, when Jack accepts his destiny at the fire, was similarly heartwarming.

Jacob's theme comes back in a big way in the episode, as does Jacob. After his whiny, immature characterization in last week's epsiode, it was nice to see the confident, relaxed Jacob back in the picture. Couple of really nice variations on his theme and chord progression.

The episode was carried, however, by Desmond's sideways theme. The theme itself is incredibly simple, and yet is able to create a sense of mystery and forward motion at the same time. Giacchino has a lot of fun with it in this episode (just as Henry Ian Cusick seems to be having a blast as Desmond), and the theme has a rousing, rambunctious statement during the final sideflash scene. It almost sounded like Lost if Mozart or someone else from the classical era was using the theme, giving it unbelievable energy.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Lengthy article on Lost up at FSM!

http://www.filmscoremonthly.com/daily/article.cfm/articleID/6497/Giacchino%E2%80%99s-LOST-%E2%80%93-A-Journey-Complete/

Giacchino’s LOST – A Journey Complete Posted By: Mark Ford on May 19, 2010 - 4:00 PM

Scoreside%20Banner%206.JPG

Volume 2, Number 7

As LOST completes its six year run Sunday, May 23, the door closes on a series that rewrote the rules of television narrative and took viewers on a weekly cinematic journey shot on location in beautiful Hawaii. Many fans have left the series along the way for various reasons, but there is no denying its individuality and tropical allure. During its entire run, Michael Giacchino provided a score unlike any other in television which became truly iconic in defining the sound of the series. When hearing the music, there is little doubt which show it comes from. This is a farewell to the series and the music that played a major role in making LOST a one of a kind entry into the annals of American television history.<a name="eteaser">

lostseason1.jpgProbably the most noticeable and singular aspect of Giacchino’s score for LOST is its orchestral complement which he not only started out with, but stuck with for the entire run of the series. The basic ensemble consists of a full string section, percussion, piano, harp and trombone, no other brass or woodwinds at all. Joining them from time to time are additional instruments such as guitar, ukulele and synthesizer. Giacchino went Herrmannesque here with his use of a unique orchestral palette to create a distinctive sound so evocative of the series.

There are some notable uses of instruments in the scoring that have become signature elements of the “LOST” sound, not the least of which is Giacchino’s use of the trombones. The fact that the trombones are the only wind instruments used is interesting enough in itself, but it’s the use of the trombone's trademark slide glissando effect which stands out punctuating many a LOST cue, most notably the fast downward glissando ending a scene leading to a commercial break. Giacchino varies the color and texture of the trombone sound throughout his scoring through the use of various muting techniques. When played using a mute in its upper register, the trombone sound fills in quite nicely for the missing silver metallic sound of the trumpet, but with its own indigenous sound.

The strings provide some special sounds of their own to the mix. Like the trombones, they are called upon to provide glissandos to punctuate elements in a scene and even further play entire sections portamento, sliding from note to note, usually in the upper register. Another string technique used quite often is the use of bowing sul ponticello (playing near/on the bridge) in order to provide a thin, brittle, nasal sound of varying harmonics. This technique is most effective in the score when played tremolo which creates a very nervous, agitated and suspenseful sound.

The percussion section is large and varied with many instruments, Various percussive techniques are used to create an exotic and at times eerie soundscape, but none more unique than the use of the actual parts from the wrecked plane used on the series. I’ve always thought of this as the Oceanic-flight-815-crashed-plane-parts-o-phone. You won’t hear that particular sound on ANY other series that’s for sure!

And finally a sound that defines for me the possible deadly and serious nature of the island and that is the plucking of a single, usually lower register string on the harp and letting it ring. It’s a dead sound that is dire in its effect and is very often used to punctuate a scene for emphasis or as slowly repeated ostinato to provide measured suspense. At times the string sounds over-plucked producing a distorted ringing sound making it even more effective. At times, it very much reminds me of a bell tolling in the distance at night.

giacchino.jpgCompositionally, Giacchino uses a leitmotiv structure for thematic material providing themes for characters, places, actions and ideas. Many of the character’s themes are quite similar being variants of some of the same chordal progressions and melodic material. This seems to be very organic in nature and perhaps helps psychologically tie many of the characters together. This is a fairly subtle approach to thematic creation as opposed to a more operatic/overt style such as was used for example in the Star Wars films where each theme was usually very individual and instantly recognizable. The themes in LOST at times are more subliminal in there usage working well below the surface.

Hallmarks of Giacchino’s writing style for LOST are many and varied, but a couple do come to mind easily. Solo piano is used quite effectively for many of the quieter, more intimate moments between characters. Many may think this is clichéd, but one of the reasons it’s used by composers so often is because it just works so damned well. The sound of a solo piano playing a slow, simple passage has been used to evoke quite a many things going back hundreds of years. No need to dismiss it simply because it’s been used a lot before. There is a reason for its continued usage and if it fits and works, then use it!

Giacchino regularly gives the cellos, both as a section and as a solo instrument, the melodic line rather than the traditional method of it being played by the higher voiced violins. The violins in turn, quite often provide the countermelody and fill out the upper harmony. This is not only a trait of his music for LOST, but in the case of the solo cello, it’s also one he employs in many of his other scores as well. The cello provides a somewhat melancholy sound with a rich, earnest depth to it, perhaps indicative of the feel Giacchino wants imparted to a scene. Also, one of the reasons for his use of the instrument could be due to his Italian heritage as many an Italian composer favored solo cello writing in their works...or, maybe not. Just unsupported conjecture on my part!

It has been said by many that the music of LOST works well in the series, but not so much as a stand alone listen. To some extent that may be true as many of the cues seem to fit hand in glove with the scenes they support, but taken on their own don’t have the structure some would like which would perhaps make them stand on their own better. That of course begs the usual question of what is the ultimate purpose of music in a film or television show. I won’t get into that particular discussion here.

I will say that I personally don’t have a problem with the music taken on its own. Part of that may have to do with me being an avid fan of the series so it's easy for me to replay scenes in my head by just listening to the music and getting meaning and feeling from the thematic materials constructed for each, an important trait of the leitmotiv system of composition. Another, is that I find the subtle differences in much of the thematic material requires a more dedicated listen from me. If I listen to one of the CDs of LOST where I'm listening to it more in the background or not as my primary focus, then it doesn’t always register as it should; however, when I give it some focus everything changes. When I hear the themes as they interplay with each other and allow the atmospheric soundscape to wash over me, then it all comes together as a very satisfying listening experience.

Foot-statue.jpgThere is so much more I could write about the music of LOST, only touching on some of the highlights here, but since this is just a blog article and not a dissertation or essay contest entry I’ll stop here. I would though like to call attention to the hard and dedicated work done by one of our FSM board members in an effort to chronicle Giacchino’s music for LOST. Antzstuff is the creator of The Four Trombones, a subsection of his excellent website Music by Michael Giacchino, dedicated to cataloging all of the themes and motifs of LOST, providing sound samples for each. I’ve used this as a reference many times since he brought it online this past year. Many, many thanks for the great work you’ve done Anthony!

The journey for Michael Giacchino and LOST is complete, but the music will live on in the excellent series of individual season CDs released by Varèse Sarabande. With one release still yet to come, the journey is not quite complete for everyone after all and for that I’m very thankful.

"Live together, die alone."

Link to post
Share on other sites

So, ignoring the actual finale, which really SHOULD get its own CD release like Season 3, I thought I'd mention that Jimmy Kimmel's band last night was actually led by Giacchino and they were playing jazz arrangements of Lost music for the whole show - for instance, when Matthew Fox was walking out, they were rocking the Oceanic 6 theme. Maybe it's just me, but I'd totally buy a whole CD of jazz Lost covers.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So, ignoring the actual finale, which really SHOULD get its own CD release like Season 3, I thought I'd mention that Jimmy Kimmel's band last night was actually led by Giacchino and they were playing jazz arrangements of Lost music for the whole show - for instance, when Matthew Fox was walking out, they were rocking the Oceanic 6 theme. Maybe it's just me, but I'd totally buy a whole CD of jazz Lost covers.

Can we get a video of this?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.