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ROTJ missing scene with Williams music

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Lucas can do whatever he wants with his property. I'm also appreciative of some of the things that have from from his work inside the industry in the technology side. I also don't begrudge him the success he's had.

That being said, it's becoming more obvious to me that his version of Star Wars isn't what we saw in 1977. Thankfully technology was limited and there was only so much he could do. He actually had to make a film and think more about what he was going to do to overcome certain limitations.

It's also more apparent that his lack of on set involvement in Empire made the film as good as it ended up being. Once he started putting his hands all over things, Jedi is what started the downslide, and had the funds and technology at his disposal, Star Wars lost its appeal.

John Williams' music to the original trilogy is something that has stood the test of time. It is something I will continue to listen to for the rest of my life.

However it's sad that the film that brought me so much joy will probably never be viewed by my eyes again.

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I miss Star Wars. I mean, the real one. The SE's are their own thing... a snapshot of 1997 technology. But they don't feel right. I pop in the 2006 editions of the originals instead of the SE's, in all their non-anamorphic misery. That's right, I sacrifice picture quality to enjoy the original versions. Sucks.

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That being said, it's becoming more obvious to me that his version of Star Wars isn't what we saw in 1977. Thankfully technology was limited and there was only so much he could do. He actually had to make a film and think more about what he was going to do to overcome certain limitations.

It wasn't just the technology that is the issue. Lucas was a nobody back then, he had a tremendous amount to prove with Star Wars, and the production itself was notoriously difficult. It was a miracle it was even completed. Nowadays he has no one to answer to, complete creative control, a huge empire (pun intended), and an overinflated ego.

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The thing that really doesn't make sense is the fact that he's made such a big deal about preservation, and yet here we are, thirteen years after the SEs, still waiting...

He probably considers Star Wars to be WIP until he dies.

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One thing which does give me some satisfaction from all this is the fact that Lucas has become a WHOPPER of a fallen idol. For a couple of decades he was worshipped by all lovers of Star Wars, to the point that he was almost some sort of mysterious, ethereal god of cinema. He had HUGE respect from film goers and industry folk alike, he could do no wrong. But in the end; he was exposed... and people turned against him, film goers and industry folk alike, his reputation is in the gutter. I know people who genuinely and passionately HATE the guts of Lucas, which in itself is pretty fascinating. Yeah he's got the cash and the empire, but I betcha any money he quietly despairs to himself; the fact that people in general no longer think of him in the same way as they did twenty years ago. During those little moments he has alone, like when he awakes in the morning, or when he's in the bathroom, I bet it hurts more than just his ego.

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One thing which does give me some satisfaction from all this is the fact that Lucas has become a WHOPPER of a fallen idol. For a couple of decades he was worshipped by all lovers of Star Wars, to the point that he was almost some sort of mysterious, ethereal god of cinema. He had HUGE respect from film goers and industry folk alike, he could do no wrong. But in the end; he was exposed... and people turned against him, film goers and industry folk alike, his reputation is in the gutter. I know people who genuinely and passionately HATE the guts of Lucas, which in itself is pretty fascinating. Yeah he's got the cash and the empire, but I betcha any money he quietly despairs to himself; the fact that people in general no longer think of him in the same way, as they did twenty years ago. I bet it hurts more than just his ego.

So you think Mr. Plinkett's Youtube reviews made him cry?

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No, but I bet they really, really bloody annoy him.

that's possibly the cause of him delaying the restored OT. Taking his small sweet revenge :P

Really Quint, do you truly rejoice when you think Lucas feels bad about himself?

That's pretty wicked...

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I betcha any money he quietly despairs to himself; the fact that people in general no longer think of him in the same way as they did twenty years ago. During those little moments he has alone, like when he awakes in the morning, or when he's in the bathroom, I bet it hurts more than just his ego.

What? Was Rick McCallum fired and nobody replaced him?

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Here's a fascinating and quite eloquent article that describes Lucas' purported fall and what prompted it.

This article is amazing. It's terrifying how all of this came together. Between this and the other article posted with the interview of Kurtz, Jedi seems to be one of the biggest lost opportunities ever.

Maybe we're lucky Lucas hasn't messed with Empire more than he did!

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Here's a fascinating and quite eloquent article that describes Lucas' purported fall and what prompted it.

That's got to be one of the most illuminating things I've read online in quite some time. Thank you very much for the link, Henry. I knew that collaboration was key to Lucas's earlier success, but that article really made it clear exactly how much his triumphs were dependent on others being able to refine the broad strokes of his imagination.

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Yes, it's indeed a very good analysis, even though much of the writing is based on information found in biographies like Dale Pollock's Skywalking and John Baxter's Mythmaker.

What I personally don't like about nowadays Lucas is that he constantly centralize everything about Star Wars on himself. Of course, he's the Maker and he takes both the Glory and the Blame. But film is THE collaborative art par excellence and the huge success of the original trilogy depends also on the merits of a great artistic team wonderfully put together: John Williams, Larry Kasdan, Ben Burtt, John Barry (the great production designer, not the composer of course), Norman Reynolds, Ralph McQuarrie, Joe Johnston, Stuart Freeborn, Dennis Muren, John Dykstra, Richard Edlund, Lorne Peterson, Gil Taylor, Peter Suschitzky, Paul Hirsch, Marcia Lucas, Richard Chew... and all the designers, conceptual artists, costume designers, art directors etc. And, of course, actors, producers and filmmakers.

For example, I always loved that the original three films were all produced in England and they showcased all the wonderful craftsmanship of British film crews back then. It's sad that very few people seem to acknowledge this aspect.

Now, when people talks about Star Wars, it seems that they're speaking about something like a painting, where the Artist is creating everything by himself. Of course Lucas still depended on talented people when he made the prequels, but it's curious that only Williams and Burtt where the ones who worked on the previous three films (and they were probably the only ones who could heavily dissent with Lucas on specific aspects of their work).

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I agree 100%, Maurizio, great post. Indeed, the OT had probably the best creative team ever assembled for any movie, it was a true "the stars aligned" kind of event. I don't think any movie has ever had such a high standard across all the creative fields that surround the work of a director and writer. From the music, of course, sound design, production design, all of them have had a life of their own decades after the movie and even when completely separated from it. It's just something to behold.

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Here's a fascinating and quite eloquent article that describes Lucas' purported fall and what prompted it.

"Luke, you've hardly touched your dinner. Have some bum-bum extract. It's very mild."

Yikes.

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"Don't worry, I'm not going to kiss you here. You see, I'm quite selfish about my pleasure, and it wouldn't be much fun for me now." Shades of Attack of the Clones, indeed.

Why God, why?

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Do you really think George Lucas feels bad about himself for one second?

I can see, and truly understand, why it would give people satisfaction if he did, but I seriously, seriously doubt it.

The guy made two movies that started modern cinema, was involved in another screen legend, and with the prequels, as smelling a pile of Gungan poo they may be, he brought his own vision to the big screen with state of the art technology.

And he is best friends with one of the greatest storytellers ever, Steven Spielberg.

The man has achieved his life's dream, and even though people think he should have made different decisions, it is HIS life's dream and not theirs, and that's why he can be fully satisfied and pleased with himself.

And he most likely is.

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So Star Wars and The Empire Strikes Back, fantastic as they are, were just happy accidents.

Yes and no. There was a huge element of good luck involved, but Lucas didn't just accidentally allow others to help him. He intentionally collaborated in a process that helped eliminate his nasty fingerprints from the writing and character development. If he'd had the same dictatorial mindset he had for the prequels, they would have been nearly as bad. (The inability to go too far with the visual effects might have forced him to work on the script a little more, but still, the guy knew he was a terrible writer.)

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If that article is to be believed, the writing Star Wars was greatly influenced and refined by the other great filmmakers Lucas was friends with. As for American Graffiti, I've never seen it, but the article claims that one allowed him to just write what he knew. It's a little easier to put human emotion into what you're writing if you've been through it yourself and experienced said emotions - which was also the case with Star Wars, in a less direct way.

If you look at the earlier drafts of Star Wars, they're truly horrendous.

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