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What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)


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The Adventures of Tintin and War Horse. 2011 was an excellent year for John Williams fans. Both albums are hugely enjoyable.   Karol

Elmer Bernstein - The Unused Scores   This set spans three Bernstein rejections, starting in 1985 - probably his first - to 1995, when he already became notorious for being thrown off as muc

LOTR: The Fellowship of the Ring (CR) by Howard Shore   Damn, is this shit good. I've waxed enough poetic about these scores, but this time, I'm especially struck by how FOTR works as a mood

Road to Perdition by Thomas Newman

 

One of my personal favourites. I consider it one Newman's essential works, if only because it's one of the few scores that gets close to capturing Newman in his many colours. It makes a genuine attempt to go beyond just "moments" or singular ideas, something that modern Newman scores are often guilty of. Road to Perdition is authentic all throughout, and shows off the composer's dramatic strengths, ranging from haunting modal contrapuntal passages, jaunty string ensemble vignettes, nuanced soundscapes to his now-popular intimate piano themes. It's an admirable package. This was Newman at his prime.

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Yeap. Top tier Newman.

 

Thirteen Days by Trevor Jones

 

Restoration by James Newton Howard

 

Memoirs of a Geisha by John Williams

 

 

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10 hours ago, KK said:

Inherent Vice by Johnny Greenwood

 

One of the most evocative scores in years. Always hits the right spot.

I'll have to check this one out ASAP.

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Silvestri's main theme is just terrific and his action music while it takes a page out of his previous scores integrates a darker should we say more modern urgent incarnation of it that is more palatable in these new grittier films than the idealistic march heard in during the end credits. Still among the best Marvel scores in my book.

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Here' my updated (generous) playlist for 'Huntsman - Winter's War': clocking in at roughly 37 minutes it loses another 38 minutes of mostly formless filler material and drab, monotonous spectacle (probably farmed out to some computer program that by now should be perfectly able to mesh all the brick box ingredients). Still, what is there isn't bad, occasionally even delicate and pretty - it sounds as if a human being wrote it. Should make for a good 1-hour playlist with 'Snow White'.

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52 minutes ago, KK said:

Not a very high standard to beat though, is it?

It shouldn't be but they keep producing rather mediocre material in comparison for these films.

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Inherent Vice by Jonny Greenwood: While certainly interesting and for the lack of better word Herrmannesque this score doesn't quite rise to the levels of excellence I thought from all the praise I hear here.

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On 4/16/2016 at 3:32 AM, publicist said:

That of course begs the question why nowadays whatever remains of King Louie in his uncanniest cgi incarnation doesn't even rate as much as a motif (two of the old score's catchiest tunes). 

Actually, I Wan'na Be Like You is used as King Louie's (action) motif at 1:10 of Cold Lair Chase.

(But you probably already knew that)

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The Shawshank Redemption by Thomas Newman: Ah this is such a lovely Newman classic, containing all that is good and endearing about his music and personal voice in the right balance. The accessible melodism, the quirkiness, the inventive soundscape and atmospheric painting through specialty instruments. Good stuff.

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52 minutes ago, Faleel said:

Actually, I Wan'na Be Like You is used as King Louie's (action) motif at 1:10 of Cold Lair Chase.

(But you probably already knew that)

 

Yeah there are snippets shoehorned in what sounds like undistinguished JNH action music or even James Horner ('To the River') but it is all rather sad.

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10 hours ago, Incanus said:

Inherent Vice by Jonny Greenwood: While certainly interesting and for the lack of better word Herrmannesque this score doesn't quite rise to the levels of excellence I thought from all the praise I hear here.

It's severely overrated by Croc, KK, and TGP. 

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2 hours ago, Koray Savas said:

It's severely overrated by Croc, KK, and TGP. 

 

2 hours ago, Romão said:

 

I love Shasta, and I think it's a terrific piece of music. The rest of the score doesn't quite live up to it

 

It simply does a lot more for me than a lot of what comes out of film music these days. There is something about the confidence Greenwood brings to his music, and an eye for bringing in textures and timbres from the various genres he's worked in, to write pieces that are uniquely his own, is what I find refreshing. In a way, he does what Herrmann was so good at doing back in his day, but in his own distinct fashion.

 

Moments like this just scream the kind of individuality that makes Greenwood so appealing:

 

And this cue alone, makes the whole album worth it! Wonderful Herrmannesque theme. And considering the level of craftsmanship that is apparent in all 3 of the Shasta cues, it seems to be a theme that struck a chord with him as well.

 

 

I just wish we had more of this to get excited about rather than the umpteenth Marvel/DC/SW sequel/prequel/spinoff.

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19 minutes ago, KK said:

I just wish we had more of this to get excited about rather than the umpteenth Marvel/DC/SW sequel/prequel/spinoff.

Well yes, naturally, but the modern studio system perpetuates the kind of "play it safe" formula that applies not only to the films but also to their music. It is often the smaller films that offer chances for experimentation or subtler but infinitely more interesting work.

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Definitely. Still, sometimes you wish there was more demand fro film music listeners as well for this kind of music, that often gets dismissed in favour of more conventional film music tradition.

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1 hour ago, TheGreyPilgrim said:

How can anything be "overrated?"  Can someone like something too much?  Is there a manual that only some, presumably those who use the word overrated, posses, which dictates the correct levels of enjoyment for all things?

I have been under the impression some people do have these manuals yes.

 

Tale of a Lake by Panu Aaltio: Aaltio's orchestral and thematic writing is as solid as it was with Tale of a Forest, another documentary score and there is now a charming vocal soloist element to the music representing the water spirit Ahitar which features in the story steeped in Finnish folk lore that is woven throughout the documentary. Consisting mostly of individual vignettes in various styles (a common occurence is such wild life documentaries) from quirky humour to yearning drama, the album is full of variety with the central themes sprinkled throughout to give the music a narrative and dramatic arc. Ranging from Wagnerian grandeur to the ethereal wordless singing by Finnish songwriter/singer Johanna Kurkela this score provides an entertaining hour long listening experience where the composer's sense of enjoyment in painting with such a wide brush so freely in orchestral environment can be heard loud and clear.

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6 minutes ago, crocodile said:

:music: Return to Oz by David Shire. Did I ever mention how much I love this score?

 

Karol

I hope my Intrada package arrives soon so I too can enjoy it. Apart from the ragtime march I liked the excerpts I have heard very much.

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Rag time march isn't one of my favourite things but its inclusion makes sense if you take into account the plot of this film and how it goes deeper into Dorothy's psyche. There are a lot of period genres mixed up with the orchestral writing that sort of speak to her subconscious and how it's possible that everything that happens is only her imagination working ovetime. And the score subtly plants that doubt in listener's mind while also serving its fantasy fairy tale role. It's really brilliant if you think about it. It's only after watching the film recently that it started to make sense.

 

Karol

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Given that it is David Shire we are talking about, one might guess there is a bit deeper handling of the subject matter than mere underscoring the thrills and chills here. :)

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James Newton Howard - The Huntsman: Winter's War

 

Not sure what others are praising here.  I don't remember a thing about this, completely un-memorable.

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10 hours ago, KK said:

 

 

It simply does a lot more for me than a lot of what comes out of film music these days. There is something about the confidence Greenwood brings to his music, and an eye for bringing in textures and timbres from the various genres he's worked in, to write pieces that are uniquely his own, is what I find refreshing. In a way, he does what Herrmann was so good at doing back in his day, but in his own distinct fashion.

 

Moments like this just scream the kind of individuality that makes Greenwood so appealing:

 

And this cue alone, makes the whole album worth it! Wonderful Herrmannesque theme. And considering the level of craftsmanship that is apparent in all 3 of the Shasta cues, it seems to be a theme that struck a chord with him as well.

 

 

I just wish we had more of this to get excited about rather than the umpteenth Marvel/DC/SW sequel/prequel/spinoff.

 

Great selections. You've just broadened my appreciation for this score

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:music: Superman IV: The Quest for Peace by Alexander Courage. I'm just listening to random cues, not entire score. One of my favourite tracks is Lacy's Place in which Courage creates a playful scherzo with two John Williams love themes (Can You Read My Mind and Lacy's Theme) fighting for supremacy. And Superman's material is caught right in the middle. Breezy piece that shows Courage's skill in adapting Williams and creating something really fun.

 

 

And there's another cool piece in which Courage does a similar thing with Lex and Nuclear Man themes. Notice how  much more menacing March of the Villain is in this version:

 

 

And, of course, there is the United Nations scene. And here Courage goes to new extremes when he presents. Especially after 2:00 mark where he states Superman's themes, Lacy's theme, Jeremy's theme and Can You Read My Mind all together.

 

 

So yeah, it might be using someone else's material. But it certainly isn't lazy.

 

Karol

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39 minutes ago, Jay said:

 

Shut your mouth!

I shan't! I won't!

 

Return to Oz by David Shire: I need to take a few more listen for this intricate work to fully sink in but after the first proper listen of the Intrada set I have to say this score is an absolute delight from start to finish. The 1980's seems like an endless treasure trove of these masterful scores for all kinds of flights of fancy.

 

:music:Cocoon

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