Jump to content

What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 41.9k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • crocodile

    4138

  • Incanus

    3774

  • #SnowyVernalSpringsEternal

    2300

  • Jay

    2272

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

The Adventures of Tintin and War Horse. 2011 was an excellent year for John Williams fans. Both albums are hugely enjoyable.   Karol

Elmer Bernstein - The Unused Scores   This set spans three Bernstein rejections, starting in 1985 - probably his first - to 1995, when he already became notorious for being thrown off as muc

LOTR: The Fellowship of the Ring (CR) by Howard Shore   Damn, is this shit good. I've waxed enough poetic about these scores, but this time, I'm especially struck by how FOTR works as a mood

8 minutes ago, TheGreyPilgrim said:

That one rocks!

Most of those JNH & Shyamalamadingdong collaborations do on various levels. Apart from perhaps After Earth.

 

Cocoon by James Horner: The bleeding heart Horner wrote this sappy fantasy score with memorable themes, excitement and grand finale with a long end credits suite to boot. It's kind of terrific in a magnificent way.

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 4.5.2016 at 8:26 AM, Incanus said:

The Secret of NIMH by Jerry Goldsmith: This is a top rate animation score to be sure but even after a number of listens I don't find myself giving it unequivocal top marks overall. Some magic is oddly missing in this score for me.

 

It's not missing magic (whatever that is) but it was written in a time when nobody minded having a score like this with a really harsh Stravinsky spin. The tone at times is very dark and modernistic which was avoided by later scores for the genre in lieu of a more sugary overall tone. If you would excise parts like 'Th Tractor' or the first two minutes of 'Sentry Reel' the tone would be markedly different.

Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, publicist said:

 

It's not missing magic (whatever that is) but it was written in a time when nobody minded having a score like this with a really harsh Stravinsky spin. The tone at times is very dark and modernistic which was avoided by later scores for the genre in lieu of a more sugary overall tone. If you would excise parts like 'Th Tractor' or the first two minutes of 'Sentry Reel' the tone would be markedly different.

I find it a bit hard to muster very much excitement during a listen for about half of the album (sans those different song versions at the end + Paul Williams's atrocious performance, which do not count). Let's just leave this as one of those Goldsmith classics I don't fully get.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Half of 60 minutes isn't bad at all.

 

I still think that listeners are easily turned off by the more - for this genre - audacious idioms meshed. It's Ravel crossed with Stravinsky and original (and for me, gorgeous) as it is, the gold standard has become something like 'Land Before Time' and similar stuff that is much more traditional and 'grasp'-able in its harmonic  language. Still good that you tried...;)

Link to post
Share on other sites
29 minutes ago, publicist said:

Half of 60 minutes isn't bad at all.

 

I still think that listeners are easily turned off by the more - for this genre - audacious idioms meshed. It's Ravel crossed with Stravinsky and original (and for me, gorgeous) as it is, the gold standard has become something like 'Land Before Time' and similar stuff that is much more traditional and 'grasp'-able in its harmonic  language. Still good that you tried...;)

By comparison I like the contemporary Poltergeist sharing some of the same elements much better. Go figure what in The Secret of NIMH my brain finds wanting.

Link to post
Share on other sites

For me it's the other way around. I find myself not often listening to 'Poltergeist', possibly due to the fact that the leaner style of NIMH is more to my liking than the somewhat bombastic Spielberg score. Be that as it may, i give kudos to Goldsmith for introducing me to the wonders of impressionism and dissonance at a point when i didn't venture much beyond the flying theme from 'E. T.' in style and content.

Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, TheGreyPilgrim said:

That one rocks!

Signs is up there with one of my favorite scores of all-time.

 

I read something with the opening titles that JNH and M Night both wanted the viewer to experience everything that movie was going to give you all in that 2 minute span.  And JNH accomplishes it.  I love the campiness of it! (the opening titles - NOT the score) 

 

I'd argue that Signs is almost like a modern day Jaws....almost!  :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

'The Ballad of Cable Hogue' is maybe Sam Peckinpah's most relaxed western, a quiet, leisurely swansong to the Old West with Jason Roboards as prospector slightly off his rockers (and not always surefooted scatological interludes) - Goldsmith responds with what may be his most uncharacteristic, most hippie-ish western score, an eclectic mixture centered around an ironic country ballad 'sung' by the title character, a Pete Seeger-styled love theme and lots of scattered down home fiddle and harmonica stuff.

 

Songwriter Richard Gillis had a hand in developing the songs, probably the reason they are much more long-lined than Goldsmith's typically short and punchy main themes for the genre. The reflective tone yields some teary-eyed lyrical interludes and though it would mean bending myself to describe 'Ballad' as great score, it is a very simpatico addition to the often ballsy Goldsmith genre contributions like '100 Rifles' (probably the most ferocious western score nobody has ever heard of).

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, baby mustard said:

You must not follow me anymore. There's been stuff, though the good photos are still getting touched up. But thanks. 

 

Frankly we've been so busy prepping our condo since we're buying a house I've barely been on Facebook lately!

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 06 May 2016 at 2:52 PM, Muad'Dib said:

Trevor Jones goes hard :rock:

 

 

 

You want TJ hard? Try "Excalibur", or "The Last Place On Earth".

 

 

On 07 May 2016 at 9:55 AM, Lonnegan said:

Poltergeist is my favourite Goldsmith score.

If anything, "NIMH" sounds like a precurser to "Legend". There's not as much Debussy in "NIMH", as there is in "Poltergeist".


 

7 hours ago, Incanus said:

Bad form!

 

Who, here, does not belong? Some-one, here, does not belong!

Link to post
Share on other sites
On Saturday, May 07, 2016 at 0:45 AM, publicist said:

 

It's not missing magic (whatever that is) but it was written in a time when nobody minded having a score like this with a really harsh Stravinsky spin. The tone at times is very dark and modernistic which was avoided by later scores for the genre in lieu of a more sugary overall tone. If you would excise parts like 'Th Tractor' or the first two minutes of 'Sentry Reel' the tone would be markedly different.

You don't know what magic is and you're on the John Williams site? Call me baffled.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, Nick Tatopoulos's Beret said:

Batman Returns

The Rocketeer

ID4

Batman (1989)

Batman (1989) Prince OST

 

Branching out, I see!

Just now, Nick Tatopoulos's Beret said:

Batman Returns

The Rocketeer

ID4

Batman (1989)

Batman (1989) Prince OST

 

Branching out, I see!

Just now, Nick Tatopoulos's Beret said:

Batman Returns

The Rocketeer

ID4

Batman (1989)

Batman (1989) Prince OST

 

Branching out, I see!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.