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What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)


Ollie

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Titanic

 

LLL with all alternates and source music, Back to Titanic and select tracks from the "film mix" leak.

 

I don't see the need to speed this one up. We are making excellent time.

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11 hours ago, Margo Channing said:

 

Huh? If tracks don't normally play at "100%", then what's their normal playback speed?

I meant I had to play some tracks twice as fast to make them eventful.

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I'm not sure in which thread to post this, but...I've just heard a charming play on BBC Radio 4, about the writing of the score for WATERSHIP DOWN. It's called 1977, and it has loads of film, and film music references. The gang's all there: Morley, Rawlings, Wilkinson, Dodds, CTS. It's a lovely listen.

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The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, by Howard Shore. :music:

 

A very fine film score. It has a certain warmth and atmosphere that seems to be lacking in Shore's latter entries in the trilogy. What I like about this score is the fact that instead of solely rehashing previous themes and motifs from his LOTR trilogy, Shore instead largely relies on his worthy new compositions to carry the score along, and uses his previous LOTR themes sparingly and when thematically necessary.

 

**** out of *****

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9 minutes ago, John said:

The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey, by Howard Shore. :music:

 

A very fine film score. It has a certain warmth and atmosphere that seems to be lacking in Shore's latter entries in the trilogy. What I like about this score is the fact that instead of solely rehashing previous themes and motifs from his LOTR trilogy, Shore instead largely relies on his worthy new compositions to carry the score along, and uses previous LOTR themes sparingly and only when necessary.

 

**** out of *****

Coincidentally I just listened to this score. I really enjoy that solemn brass, which I believe is the theme. I feel like it's too good not to have been done but Shore delivers with it really well. I at first didn't like Radagast's music, but I kind of like the feel now. It suits the character quite well.

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5 hours ago, Margo Channing said:

 

So you sped them up by 200%!

 

Then they'd run thrice as fast.

11 minutes ago, kaseykockroach said:

Medicine Man by Jerry Goldsmith

Never really got into this score beyond that first track, but that cue is all you really need anyway. It gets stuck in my head rather often.

 

*cough* The Trees *cough*

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a few John Barry's but foremost, though not quite a score -The Beyondness of Things

 

I read someplace ages ago this was to have been the Horse Whisperer score but was rejected by Redford. I similarly read it became some sort of love letter by Barry -either way, it's quite beautiful in places. A Childhood Memory, Kissably Close, Give me a Smile and the title track are classic Barry -yes, at times the album sounds like an extension to Dances With Wolves but it's almost impossible to find a bad Barry in my book (or at least my Dad's. Yes, some of it's 'samey' but so be it!)

 

On a total aside, was listening a fair bit to my Sinatra 'Ol Blue Eyes is Back' album and thanks to 'Dream Away Child' am seeking out Man Who Loved Cat Dancing. I have the title track someplace. I see the song was written by John [and Paul] Williams. I half hope there's a story someplace of Sinatra and Williams working together. 

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Isle of Dogs by Alexandre Desplat

 

It's exactly what you would expect. Simple, bare-bones motivic cells/fragments executed in quirky orchestrations that probably fit the Wes Anderson flick like a glove. As charming as it can be in moments, all the taiko drumming and pulsing becomes pretty anonymous by the end. It lacks The Grand Budapest's flair and exuberance.

 

 

Mary Magdalene by Jóhann Jóhannsson and Hildur Gudnadóttir

 

This was the last score Jóhannsson got to work on (though his score for Mandy hasn't been released yet). With the exception of a sagging middle section, much of it sounds like a natural continuation of what he was doing in Orphée. It's not his best work, but it features his trademark sound well enough and its highs are a fitting and moving sendoff to his career.

 

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Yasunori Mitsuda & Nobuo Uematsu - Front Mission: Gun Hazard

 

Still listen to this regularly, but no longer daily.  Just got a physical copy in the mail, I figured I owed it due to how many listens I've given to it.  Happy to own a real copy, well worth the $80!

 

 

Lena Raine - Celeste

 

The best score of 2018!  First score I ever bought digitally.  Band Camp is a nice interface!

 

 

Yasunori Mitsuda, ACE, Kenji Hiramatsu, and Manami Kiyota - Xenoblade Chronicles 2

 

I've decided: This is the best score of 2017.  I listen to it daily.  I pre-ordered the physical release from Japan!

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The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies by Howard Shore: There is some great music in this score with very intricate thematic interplay but the whole thing is hampered by the bass-heavy mix which by the end bludgeons the listener to such a daze that the whole denouement loses its power through the sheer aural fatigue from what has come before.

 

Snow Falling On Cedars by James Newton Howard: One of JNH's finest. Quiet, introspective and atmospheric yet thematic and with a narrative throughline, this score is a fascinating listening experience.

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Bollocks to the court!

It was in Norman's contract that he would have sole music credit, for DR. NO.

It's obvious that Barry created the rising/falling motif, at the beginning, and also the middle eight. He should have gotten co-credit.

Anyway, when you hear the theme, who do you think of; Barry, or Norman?

 

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...and so you should, because Bond music, is, first and foremost, Barry music. Listen to the ridiculously overscored tarantula scene (which, during its first run, had people laughing), and ask yourself why Norman was not asked to score FROM RUSSIA WITH LOVE.

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I'm not familiar with the finer points in the long case Monty vs. Barry. Did the court come to the conclusion that Barry only made an arrangement of Monty's theme, and thereby wasn't entitled to any royalties?

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Yes, it did, but if you listen to the theme, you can hear Barry all over it: like I said, the beginning, the middle eight.

Norman had a sketch for a song called BAD SIGN, GOOD SIGN, which was to form part of a musical based on the V.S. Naipaul novel A HOUSE FOR MR. BISWAS. For whatever reason, this went unused, and Norman adapted it to the theme. As I have stated, Norman had it in his contract that he would recieve sole music writing credit, on DR. NO, hence Barry only received an "arranged by" credit.

To my ears, at least, the theme is quintessentially Barry.

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14 minutes ago, Richard said:

For whatever reason, this went unused, and Norman adapted it to the theme.

 

You mean this happened after Barry had made his contribution to the theme? Confused...

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No. Norman sketched out BAD SIGN, GOOD SIGN before he was offered DR. NO. He then reused the tune and turned it into the JBT, which Barry adapted.

If you want to know the history of Bond music, I recommend John Burlingame's THE MUSIC OF JAMES BOND.

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The Godfather, by Nino Rota (additional pieces composed by Carmine Coppola) :music:

 

Very nearly a perfect film score. Stately and elegant, while at times haunting and foreboding. Fits the tone of the film like a glove. Definitely one of my top five favorite scores.

 

***** out of *****

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16 minutes ago, Richard said:

No. Norman sketched out BAD SIGN, GOOD SIGN before he was offered DR. NO. He then reused the tune and turned it into the JBT, which Barry adapted.

If you want to know the history of Bond music, I recommend John Burlingame's THE MUSIC OF JAMES BOND.

 

That's what I initially thought, but then I got a confused by your reply. :)

 

So, did Norman claim in court to have written the whole theme himself, including the rising/falling motif at the beginning and the middle eight bars?

 

Thanks for the book suggestion, btw.

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4 minutes ago, Stefancos said:

Temple Of Doom OST

OST? You mean that you willingly ignored APPROACHING THE STONES?

Hurumph. Call yourself a JWfan? :pfft:

 

 

 

 

34 minutes ago, Jurassic Shark said:

 

That's what I initially thought, but then I got a confused by your reply. :)

 

So, did Norman claim in court to have written the whole theme himself, including the rising/falling motif at the beginning and the middle eight bars?

 

Thanks for the book suggestion, btw.

I'm not sure exactly what Norman claimed to have written. All I know is that the court found in his favour. Whether that decision was based on EON's contractual obligation, or something else, only a very few people will ever know.

Like I've said, I'm convinced, by listening to Barry's music from that era, that he deserved a co-credit. In the long run, though, it doesn't matter. Barry went on to score eleven Bond films, win five Oscars, and become one of the most popular, and greatest film composers who ever lived, while Norman did...what, exactly? Oh, yeah; he's dined-out on three minutes of music, for the past fifty-six years ;)

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2 hours ago, Nick Parker said:

Well here's a hint: Monty Norman, unadorned and playing his original theme. 

 

It's okay, you don't have to watch all of it.

 

 

I did.

Well, that was two minutes, and twenty-seven seconds of my life, that I'll never get back.

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:music: Hellboy by Marco Beltrami. In the 21st century comic book film scoring this one ranks quite high. God bless Varese and their DE. The OST sounded dreadful and was a poor representation.

 

Karol

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8 minutes ago, Richard said:

That, and THE OMEN, are my favourite Beltrami scores.

I've been told that the DVD of HELLBOY has an iso. Is this correct?

The one I have has isolated score with composer's commentary.

 

Karol

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What can I say? I like it. It sounds nothing like JG's original, but it has the occasional three-note (or is that seven-note?) motif that runs through his score. More than anything, I think that it's a respectful score, befitting of someone who studied under the man, himself.

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:music: Darkest Hour by Dario Marianelli. The perpetual motion of this score feels Zimmerish in a way...but it's executed in such a graceful and elegant way that I am ready to forgive. It's well conceived, orchestrated, performed and recorded. The album doesn't feel too long at 52 minutes. This guy needs some more recognition - he knows what an orchestra is and what instruments do. Good stuff.

 

Karol

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Just now, crocodile said:

:music: Darkest Hour by Dario Marianelli. The perpetual motion of this score feels Zimmerish in a way...but it's executed in such a graceful and elegant way that I am ready to forgive. It's well conceived, orchestrated, performed and recorded. The album doesn't feel too long at 52 minutes. This guy needs some more recognition. Good stuff.

 

Karol

Any favourite parts?

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