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What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)


Ollie

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It's my favorite North score. I had to listen to it many, many times to really get a feel for it, but it does get under your skin. It is, indeed, quite brutal.

I love the reusing of the 2001 material for the end credits.

Oh, and SUN was my most listened to album for over a year after it originally came out. Great stuff.

:music: War Horse

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Yeah, I like Serra but not that much. :lol:

Listening to a ton of John Barry lately, mixing-and-matching his late-70s-and-beyond sound. One of my biggest remaining holy grails is a complete Howard The Duck; if that's not a sign of the golden age we live in, I don't know what is!

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It's my favorite North score. I had to listen to it many, many times to really get a feel for it, but it does get under your skin. It is, indeed, quite brutal.

I love the reusing of the 2001 material for the end credits.

Oh, and SUN was my most listened to album for over a year after it originally came out. Great stuff.

:music: War Horse

Yes, indeed. I can already see more of a structure. I find this score really fascinating. I'm listening to it again at this very moment,actually. Oh and there is a lot more of 2001 in there than just the end credits. In fact the A Slight Skirmish track (both versions) is based almost entirely around the material from that unused score.

Karol

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shadow.jpg

THE SHADOW - Jerry Goldsmith (Intrada Edition)

Just arrived and listening at work. It's a great cheese-gothic score and a splendid album (although it of course goes on too long, but let's not open this can of worms). The dismal Arista album makes a wonderful case for why some scores by this composer, especially in his lean & mean 90's style, just don't work in short form. As usual, Goldsmith provided a 10-cut album which somehow condensed all themes and motifs he wrote into 30 minutes - 4 whole minutes were taken up by the non-descript suspense track 'WHO ARE YOU?', but skipping evocative and colorful passages musically depicting everything from a himalayan palace to a hall of mirrors-sequence.

Here now you finally get the structure of the score - and how it tells a story musically, an art which may seem shopworn to the Chris Nolans of the world, but their films are poorer for it. The first quarter of the album establishes the backstory of the Shadow character and introduces him in 'present' time, the film's 1930's setting. This music boldly establishes Goldsmith's dark horn theme (quoting, unintentionally, a short snippet from Waxman's PRINCE VALIANT score) and a penetrating mystery mode, complete with an electronic sonar ping representing the mental powers. When Alec Baldwin is abducted and brought to the temple of a holy priest with a magic dagger (don't ask), we get a first glimpse of the brutal ferocious action music, punctuated by sharp brassy onslaughts and percussion hits, a device Goldsmith used to address the colorful (and comic) cartoon action of the movie.

Midway archenemy Khan is introduced - with a theme basically derived from Shadow's theme, since Khan is nothing but Shadow's own dark side personified (an electronic wolf howl is used to good effect, like those nasty birdcalls in STAR TREK V). The woodblock percussion for Khan is one of the score's highpoints - there's a moment in the cue CHEST PAINS when Khan's henchmen nail Alec Baldwin to a wall and while he struggles to get free, Goldsmith unleashes the rhythmic backbone of the Shadow theme heroically on horns and lets it battle against the slashing percussion in a moment i think is one of the finest proofs what genius action composer Goldsmith really was when he got the right assignments (THE SHADOW was a great wake-up call after snoozers like ANGIE).

A perfunctory love theme crops up here and there, but while things start to drag in the middle (too many repeats of the same material), the last quarter consisting of THE HOTEL, FIGHT LIKE A MAN and THE MIRRORS is pure Goldsmith bombast bliss, bursting with furious action writing - the alternate THE MIRRORS cue is, btw, far better than the more stately first version, with a thundering denouement of the Shadow theme and some mean brass work.

All this of course could have been presented within a good 60 minute album cutting out short cues and redundancies, but whose to complain. As it is, it's a veritable Goldsmith bonanza which should at the very least rehabilitate the score for those who found it a bit middling on the old album. while some have complained that Goldsmith modelled his theme on Elfman's original BATMAN theme, it should be noted that Goldsmith's at least clearly sounds like Goldsmith. Sound quality is perfect, too.

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A Little Princess, by Patrick Doyle

This is absolutely gorgeous, lyrical stuff. I also loved the Indian passages. What happened with this Patrick Doyle? The one who wrote this lovely score, Much Ado About Nothing, Henry V, etc?

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Your review of The Shadow sounds promising publicist. :) I hope my wallet gets some filling soon so I can get both The First Knight (which has been on my buy list forever) and this one. I liked the OST for The Shadow but it always felt like only half a score, needing more musical meat on the bones.

A Little Princess, by Patrick Doyle

This is absolutely gorgeous, lyrical stuff. I also loved the Indian passages. What happened with this Patrick Doyle? The one who wrote this lovely score, Much Ado About Nothing, Henry V, etc?

Doyle has adapted to the new film scoring climate I am afraid. La Ligne Droite was the last Doyle score that really impressed me and it was for a smaller film and a small ensemble piece. The Doyle of yesteryear is still there but it is nowadays buried in the synths, fashionable action string ostinati, unisono brass blasts and deep drums.
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I thought you hate everything related to childish superhero genre.

Seriously, though, is it this good?

Karol

THE SHADOW is from a faraway time when escapist junk meant at least a full-bodied score working overtime. I listened to Silvestri's AVENGERS and found the level of blandness to be an accomplishment in itself - i forgot what i was listening to before i even heard it (and i'm not bothering with stuff like WOLVERINE etc.).

THE SHADOW isn't THE BLUE MAX or WIND AND THE LION, for sure, but on its GREMLINS 2-level of zaniness, it's just a fun romp with a youthful zest and vigour seldom found in Goldsmith's later years. It's fucking entertaining...and full of set pieces with musical structure which i solely miss in filmmusic today.

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The Good German by Thomas Newman: A strangely compelling listening experience and a younger composer's journey in the footsteps of his father and the other great masters of the Golden Age of Hollywood. Thomas Newman was to my mind an unlikely candidate to score this Soderbergh's reverent homage to the film noir genre but he pulled it off with convincing panache and skill. Here he seems to channel the past masters in style but still retains his own unmistakable touch sound and orchestration wise, the mixing of these two proving to be an almost hypnotic experience steeped in musical shadows, femme fatales, intrigue and danger around every corner.

Newman's own crystal clear and often gossamer thin orchestrations, again courtesy of Thomas Pasatieri, are at times bolstered by a heftier string and brass (horn) sound but he conjures up a very passing facsimile of the sound and style of the earlier era, full of gloomy and doom laden musical motifs, a sinuously sensuous love theme for solo violin and a thundering melodramatic main title theme for the horns and pounding timpani, smaller motifs for mystery and intrigue appearing throughout and a simple and an honestly warm Americana theme popping up a couple of times in the midst of all the musical skull duggery, a rare but welcome guest. Newman's favourite woodwinds, cor anglais and oboe make frequent appearances as well always lending subtly tragic and apprehensive air to the melodies they perform, the score having a sort of lingering and yearning feeling throughout under the veneer of mystery. It is noteworthy that while Newman at times lets loose some grand orchestral gestures, the general atmosphere of the score is restrained, the intrigue often scored by rising dark string harmonies and the glittering sharp sounds of a single harp. Personally I think it would be interesting to hear Mr. Newman using a full symphonic ensemble with the entire spectrum of instruments but he still seems to be most comfortable with the reduced forces.

Unrecht Oder Recht (Main Title) is a definite highlight, presenting all the above mentioned themes in quick succession, an overture in short, and a good musical road map to the themes of the score. This main theme heard in the Main Title appears throughout in subtle variations, somewhat more frequently than in an average Newman score, as do all the themes, a welcome change from his usually isolated thematic appearances. Tracks like The Kraut Brain Trust and The Brandenburg Gate offer more energetic scoring and variety in the otherwise mystery shrouded musical world. Action pieces on the album are short but furious, horns and strings usually providing the momentum and tension for these brief scuffles, the composer again using his own sensibilities while evoking the film scoring style of the Golden Age. And finally the love theme, which is one of Newman's finer creations is treated to a set of beautiful variations ranging from flute setting to a duet of oboe and violin, the theme having a perfect bittersweet quality of film noir's great love themes for the femme fatales, seductive but with a hint of danger. This idea is also one of the main attractions of the album and tracks like A Good Dose, The Good German, Always Something Worse and the album finale of Jedem Das Seine are among the best on the OST.

I feel that the score album is just long enough at 44 minutes as the composer definitely includes all the highlights and more. The soundtrack is also thematically quite subtle and quite gloomy in general mood so it can wear you down as many of the tracks have a lingering feel, the music languidly wafting forward, part atmosphere, part thematic storytelling. But those who love the film noir genre and intelligent and succesful modern application of some of its stylistics, this is definitely for you.

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Soul Surfer by Marco Beltrami. Very cute score.

Why is Ramin Djawadi scoring Pacific Rim instead of this guy?

From what the director said, he really liked Djawadi's work on Iron Man and "Game of Thrones" -- and wanted him (and it took them a while to finalize Djawadi's deal). Perhaps del Toro wants to switch it up and work with a different composer on each film?

I think del Toro's films do help the composers strive harder to hit that sound he wants. Navarrete, Beltrami, Elfman... maybe Djawadi will turn out something good for Pacific Rim.

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The Terminal and Far and Away

Makes doing my assignment a less excrutiating experience. Thank you John Williams.

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James Newton Howard - Alive

I love JNH's melodic, sweeping moments. I think he does it really well in many of his works (e.g. Wyatt Earp).

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Soul of the Ultimate Nation (Shore)

Music from the Edge (Corigliano)

Titus (Goldenthal)

The Wolfman (Elfman)

War Horse (Williams)

Karol

OOooh good stuff! :)
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13th Warrior by Jerry Goldsmith: A highly entertaining late 90's action/adventure score from maestro Goldsmith. This might not be a masterpiece but it is a very solid and rousing score full of classic sounds of the composer in an attractive package. Listening to this made me again miss the late composer whose style and composition sounds so effortless and so well crafted, a mark of a true master.

There Be Dragons by Robert Folk: A highly dramatic and exciting score full of heroic and tragic melodies and larger than life scoring with some nice Spanish coloration. But that might be a slight problem as well when almost every track sounds like a dramatic finale of a film, depriving the music a progression and arc, being one crescendo after another. Still an accomplished effort from a competent yet mostly unsung composer.

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Green Lantern: The Animated Series - Frederik Wiedmann

It isn't regurgitating the style Shirley Walker and her colleagues utilized for the other DC animated series like Batman, Superman, and Justice League -- but it's definitely related. It fixed what James Newton Howard failed to do in the live-action GL film... by a big margin. I'm grateful that Wiedmann was able to use a few live players (trumpet/flugel horn, solo vocal, woodwind, cello) to sweeten the sound, but imagine how much better this would've sounded with 20-40 live players... especially in more emotional cues like "A New World", "Aya's Birth" and "Into the Abyss." It goes without saying that it definitely would've made the action cues like "Hal vs. Atrocitus" and "Battle of Betrassus" even more powerful.

But the quality of the writing and mastering overcomes the budgetary constraints.... I'd recommend you guys check out a few samples, see if you like it, and buy if it appeals to you.

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The Karate Kid: Will Smith's Son Version - James Horner

It has a pretty main theme, and it has some Chinese flavors once and a while. But some of it sounds like generic modern film score (cool rhythmic light percussion track layered over some whole notes). I don't know how to describe it really, but at times I almost can't tell its Horner, and I feel like its usually pretty easy to hear a Horner score and say "oh yeah, that's James alright."

Overall I liked it and it was enjoyable, but nothing to write home about.

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Jane Eyre, Family Plot and Black Sunday. Now this is the kind of Williams I like most these days.

City Hall. One of my favourite things ever composed by Goldsmith.

Karol

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Jane Eyre, Family Plot and Black Sunday. Now this is the kind of Williams I like most these days.

City Hall. One of my favourite things ever composed by Goldsmith.

Karol

Another batch of good stuff Karol. :)
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No I haven't had the chance to listen to it. The clips back when it was released were impressive though. I look forward to taking a listen some day.

Sneakers by James Horner: The further I explore Horner's resume the more obvious his far reaching self referencing becomes. This album is full of Hornerisms that can still be heard in a number of scores nearly 20 years after. The album is a pretty enjoyable mix of suspence, upbeat thematic writing and prototypical Horner sense of awe and as a showman Horner is still a master and writes a competent score with dramatic drive, the saxophone solos of Branford Marsalis bringing something new into the otherwise well tread territory. But on the whole the suspence writing is full of Horner staples, crashing piano runs, snare drum pace setters, the mysterious element containing cooing women soloists and minimalistic figures and those classic Horner chordal progressions that all transform this album, I am sure quite fresh in sound at the time, into a rather all too familiar experience.

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For some reason I stopped posting about the scores I listened to in this thread... not sure why... possibly cause I had been in general listening to more rock/pop music than film scores I guess.

So I'll be playing catch-up for a while of scores I listened to in the last month or so before I get caught up to stuff I listened to since my last post in this thread.

Howard Shore - The Fellowship of the Ring (OST)

A nice summary of the score, though relies too heavily on Nazgul material and almost completely neglects the main History of the Ring theme (it only appears once). Still, a better produced album than say a John Williams OST... no obvious edits anywhere and the best part of any of the chosen cues are not removed. But with over 3 hours of recorded music there's no way a 70 minute highlights album will get everyone's favorite moments, so the Complete Recordings releases really were a blessing.

Howard Shore - The Two Towers (OST)

A fairly different story than the Fellowship OST. While that one was in chronological order this one is all over the place, and if you are a slave to the film order it will drive you crazy... luckily I am not and it really works quite well as its own listening experience. It misses less of the highlights compared to the FOTR OST and really moves along at a pretty brisk clip. I really enjoy the darker tone Shore takes with this score as the movie and story get appropriately darker. The final Gollum song somehow managed to still chill me a decade later every time I hear it.

Howard Shore - The Return Of The King (OST)

I dunno what it is....for some reason I just don't connect with ROTK - the film or the sore - as much as I do the first two entries. That isn't to say I don't like them, I just don't like them AS MUCH as the first two. This album is an enjoyable listen, with nice new versions of the Journey There and Gandalf The White themes, and of course wonderful performances of the Gondor, Rohan, Nature, and Fellowship themes. The Into The West theme is one of the best in the trilogy too, and even though it isn't used much, all its uses are perfect. The final song is wonderful.

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Hans Zimmer.... Dark Knight Rises.

My thoughts....................... :banghead: .. :pukeface:

Sorry. not a fan of zimmer or the Dark Knight Franchise musically speaking or otherwise. That about sums it up :nod:

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Howard Shore - The Return Of The King (OST)

I dunno what it is....for some reason I just don't connect with ROTK - the film or the sore - as much as I do the first two entries. That isn't to say I don't like them, I just don't like them AS MUCH as the first two. This album is an enjoyable listen, with nice new versions of the Journey There and Gandalf The White themes, and of course wonderful performances of the Gondor, Rohan, Nature, and Fellowship themes. The Into The West theme is one of the best in the trilogy too, and even though it isn't used much, all its uses are perfect. The final song is wonderful.

I think that ROTK is really a score you have to hear in its complete form to really "get" it. That is mainly because there are so many setpieces in the full score that slowly unfold, that cutting them down to 3 minute tracks almost kills them.

The invasion of Osgiliath for example, a 9 minute piece.

Shelob's Lair, basically 12-15 minutes long.

The Paths Of The Dead, a 10 minute suite basically.

Siege Of Gondor, at least 8-10 minutes of continuous material.

The destruction of Mordor, 7, 8 minutes of choral splendor.

It's like taking a fairy tale, and removing the ornamentations, so that it just reads "Witch poisons princess. Prince kisses her to life. And they happily lived ever after."

You get the plot, but you miss the joy.

I feel this way about Fellowship, too.

Two Towers was more fragmented, so you had more, shorter, self-contained pieces. That worked better on one disc.

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Howard Shore - The Return Of The King (OST)

I dunno what it is....for some reason I just don't connect with ROTK - the film or the sore - as much as I do the first two entries. That isn't to say I don't like them, I just don't like them AS MUCH as the first two. This album is an enjoyable listen, with nice new versions of the Journey There and Gandalf The White themes, and of course wonderful performances of the Gondor, Rohan, Nature, and Fellowship themes. The Into The West theme is one of the best in the trilogy too, and even though it isn't used much, all its uses are perfect. The final song is wonderful.

I think that ROTK is really a score you have to hear in its complete form to really "get" it. That is mainly because there are so many setpieces in the full score that slowly unfold, that cutting them down to 3 minute tracks almost kills them.

The invasion of Osgiliath for example, a 9 minute piece.

Shelob's Lair, basically 12-15 minutes long.

The Paths Of The Dead, a 10 minute suite basically.

Siege Of Gondor, at least 8-10 minutes of continuous material.

The destruction of Mordor, 7, 8 minutes of choral splendor.

It's like taking a fairy tale, and removing the ornamentations, so that it just reads "Witch poisons princess. Prince kisses her to life. And they happily lived ever after."

You get the plot, but you miss the joy.

I feel this way about Fellowship, too.

Two Towers was more fragmented, so you had more, shorter, self-contained pieces. That worked better on one disc.

I very much agree. RotK is just too large a score for a 70 minute condensation to do it full justice.
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I've said it before, I'll say it again: I think ROTK OST is the best assembled of the three. It's the one I was the most satisfied with. With the first two, there were tracks I sometimes skipped because they never did much for me (such as The Forbidden Pool in TTT or At The Sign Of The Prancing Pony in FOTR), but with this one, I loved every bit they decided to include. And it should be said that Minas Tirith is one the best edited tracks I ever listened on any soundtrack. The transition are for the most part flawless. Love it!

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See I think the ROTK OST is a better listening experience than TTT. It has all kinds of great performances of themes and not a lot of filler stuff.

I am working my way through the Complete Recordings right now and will post my thoughts when done.

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"The Grace Of Undomiel" is such an awesome piece of music that I just don't find the words.

It has statements, and variations, of five different themes, thrown together with such drive and force that blows your brain away. For me, that is almost too much grandeur to take all at once.

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Actually, I think TTT is the best OST album of the three. The most diverse. ROTK misses too much important parts and FOTR is a bit tiring with all this Nazgul material in every track.

Karol

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Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull by John Williams

Munich by John Williams

Star Wars Episode II Attack of the Clones by John Williams

A Streetcar Named Desire by Alex North

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Howard Shore - The Lord Of The Rings (The Rarities Archive)

Overall a mixed bag. Personally I can do without the synth demos entirely - it was nice to hear them once but there just isn't much about them for me to want to listen repeatedly. I also am not a fan of how they were sequenced in between the rest of the real orchestral music, it would have made more sense to me to group them together at the end of the disc after the interview. But regardless of that, the orchestral music on the CD is quite a treat. I much appreciated having so many original versions of Fellowship cues. I had always known that the "Fighting Urak-hai" cue came in mid-cue in the film and it is wonderful to finally hear the full composition. Similarly it is nice to hear what would have been the first performance of hte Isengard material in the movie before it got replaced. Overall it is interesting to see how much choir is here among all these tracks - clearly Shore originally envisioned a lot more choir being used than was ultimate used in the final cuts, between re-writing cues, dropping parts of cues, or dialing out choir in cues. An interesting CD that I am quite grateful got released, as I will use much of it for my personal edit of the scores if I ever get around to working on them again :)

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Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull by John Williams

Me too. I don't know why this score gets a bad rap sometimes. I actually Enjoy it very much! I admit that the new themes aren't all that amazing for me outside of the Russians motive (which is great). It took me a while to like Mutt's theme. At first I found it too slap stick/ goofy to fit with mutts character, but it grew on me more and more with each listen. I like irenas theme but as for the crystal motif ...not so much. It captures the other-worldly-ness of the skull well but its just not interesting to listen to imho.

I think Williams was rocking it with the action writing in this score, jungle chase and the warehouse scenes being outstanding examples of what action music and playfully integrating themes should be. Its a rush to listen to.

And it's cool that the end when the spaceship powers on, it sounds like he's referencing the same pulsating, relentless sounds from War of the Worlds. Not sure if intentional or not.

Anyway, I think its a great score and great effort by Williams.

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The Others by Alejandro Amenabar

What a lovely score this is. Very old-fashioned and rather more sophisticated from what we usually get from one-man-director-composers. The usual horror stabs might feel generic to some degree, but the music definitely exceeds with quieter drama pieces. And I love those Herrmannesque low woodwinds. Works great in the film as well.

Karol

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James Newton Howard - Signs (OST)

For some reason, I never got into this score until last year or so! I think this is mostly due to the fact that i hated the movie and haven't seen it its original theatrical run. But I kept seeing it recommended on this board, as well as the Hand of Fate cues mentioned in the Favorite cues of the 00s thread, so I gave it a shot and loved it, and quickly went out and bought the OST. I enjoy the whole CD quite a bit, the main theme is so catchy I find myself humming it long after each listen. Just listening to this again as I type this and am noticing instruments in the Main Title I hadn't noticed before. I love scores that still have new ways to impress you on repeated listens!

Side note: Do parts of this score remind anyone else of Jerry's Total Recall score?

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Agreed with everything you said! I wish the parts they talked over had played out before/after they started talking. There was room!

I also forgot to mention how this disc makes it clear the Gondor theme was a huge part of the overall score from the beginning, originally meant to appear in both the prologue and the path through the Argonath statues. I love listening to those 2 alternates, but they clearly made the right choice replacing them in the final film.

The super-long all-choral destruction of the ring alternate gets pretty tiresome after a while. But the all-choir alternate Flight To The Ford is so cool!

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Listened to this CD only once, but I remember liking the extended Emyn Muil choral segment. I like this one. Shore's vocal writing is so cool.

Currently listening to this (the whole album, not just this track):

Karol

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You just listen again! Skip the interview and synth mockups, enjoy the wonderful additional FOTR and TTT music!

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Howard must have loved that choral version of Emyn Muil too, since he included a bit of it it on both the OST and the TTT Complete Recordings - a decision I never understood considering no other cue has both the final version and an alternate present on the CRs, and he had to of known something like the Rarities Archive would be coming.

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Howard Shore - The Return Of The King (OST)

I dunno what it is....for some reason I just don't connect with ROTK - the film or the sore - as much as I do the first two entries. That isn't to say I don't like them, I just don't like them AS MUCH as the first two. This album is an enjoyable listen, with nice new versions of the Journey There and Gandalf The White themes, and of course wonderful performances of the Gondor, Rohan, Nature, and Fellowship themes. The Into The West theme is one of the best in the trilogy too, and even though it isn't used much, all its uses are perfect. The final song is wonderful.

I think that ROTK is really a score you have to hear in its complete form to really "get" it. That is mainly because there are so many setpieces in the full score that slowly unfold, that cutting them down to 3 minute tracks almost kills them.

The invasion of Osgiliath for example, a 9 minute piece.

Shelob's Lair, basically 12-15 minutes long.

The Paths Of The Dead, a 10 minute suite basically.

Siege Of Gondor, at least 8-10 minutes of continuous material.

The destruction of Mordor, 7, 8 minutes of choral splendor.

It's like taking a fairy tale, and removing the ornamentations, so that it just reads "Witch poisons princess. Prince kisses her to life. And they happily lived ever after."

You get the plot, but you miss the joy.

I feel this way about Fellowship, too.

Two Towers was more fragmented, so you had more, shorter, self-contained pieces. That worked better on one disc.

I know I'm a bit late to the party, but just wanted to add in that I also think RotK is a score that you need to fully appreciate in complete form. Out of all 3 OSTs, the RotK one is the best, but its also the score that needs its complete form the most. Having said that, I believe RotK is the strongest LotR score with fantastic highlights and a wonderfully well-thought combination of all the themes. Although the material for the Army of the Dead has its shortcomings.

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