Jump to content

What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 42.7k
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • crocodile

    4178

  • Incanus

    3776

  • Jay

    2332

  • #SnowyVernalSpringsEternal

    2300

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

The Adventures of Tintin and War Horse. 2011 was an excellent year for John Williams fans. Both albums are hugely enjoyable.   Karol

Elmer Bernstein - The Unused Scores   This set spans three Bernstein rejections, starting in 1985 - probably his first - to 1995, when he already became notorious for being thrown off as muc

LOTR: The Fellowship of the Ring (CR) by Howard Shore   Damn, is this shit good. I've waxed enough poetic about these scores, but this time, I'm especially struck by how FOTR works as a mood

6 minutes ago, Falco said:

Pop album programming 101: put your best material first.

 

That's exactly the mentality that went into this album and I'm glad it didn't persist in film score OSTs. For AVPR, it seems like a product of its time when they had those listening stations at Borders where they selected about a dozen albums as demos for prospective customers and an album producer was aware of the mentality that people would only skip through the first few tracks and move on to the next album, so they had to make an impact in tracks 1-4.

Link to post
Share on other sites
53 minutes ago, Unlucky Bastard said:

 

That's exactly the mentality that went into this album and I'm glad it didn't persist in film score OSTs. For AVPR, it seems like a product of its time when they had those listening stations at Borders where they selected about a dozen albums as demos for prospective customers and an album producer was aware of the mentality that people would only skip through the first few tracks and move on to the next album, so they had to make an impact in tracks 1-4.

It's how most Tyler OST's are arranged.

Link to post
Share on other sites
13 hours ago, bruce marshall said:

Alot of folks love this score.

I didn't notice it in the film - which was pretty bad- so can't comment.

 

 

Quality of the film aside, it doesn't help that portions of Young's score was either dropped in favor of re-using Elfman's material from the first two films or re-recordings of his motifs.

 

But the action scenes are pretty much intact, save for one bit during the construction site finale.

Link to post
Share on other sites
14 minutes ago, Matt C said:

 

Quality of the film aside, it doesn't help that portions of Young's score was either dropped in favor of re-using Elfman's material from the first two films or re-recordings of his motifs.

 

But the action scenes are pretty much intact, save for one bit during the construction site finale.

I do quite enjoy Young’s take although I didn’t find that it meshed that well with the Elfman material. Particularly prominent when the opening titles go off at a tangent and then just as abruptly dives straight back into the Elfman. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

It meshes fine for me. (I know some Elfman material was shoved in later by additional composers through rewrites and inserts though)

3 hours ago, Matt C said:

it doesn't help that portions of Young's score was either dropped in favor of re-using Elfman's material from the first two films or re-recordings of his motifs.

 

But the action scenes are pretty much intact, save for one bit during the construction site finale.

It was cool that the Editor's Cut restored a lot of Young's score

 

Don't forget the Peter Vs. Harry Goblin fight has an insert of the Elfman theme.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Fierce Creatures is a 1997 British-American farcical comedy film. While not literally a sequel, Fierce Creatures is a spiritual successor to the 1988 film A Fish Called Wanda. Both films star John Cleese, Jamie Lee Curtis, Kevin Kline and Michael Palin. Fierce Creatures was written by John Cleese and directed by Robert Young and Fred Schepisi.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fierce_Creatures

Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, Jay said:

Fierce Creatures is a 1997 British-American farcical comedy film. While not literally a sequel, Fierce Creatures is a spiritual successor to the 1988 film A Fish Called Wanda. Both films star John Cleese, Jamie Lee Curtis, Kevin Kline and Michael Palin. Fierce Creatures was written by John Cleese and directed by Robert Young and Fred Schepisi.

 

I've never understood how it's supposed to be a "spiritual successor". Both share the same core cast, are partly written by John Cleese, and involve animals in some capacity, but beyond that, Fierce Creatures couldn't be less related to Wanda. The story has nothing to do with Wanda, the characters (or even stereotypes) have nothing to do with Wanda, the animals has nothing to do with Wanda - and the humour has very little to do with Wanda, either.

 

The score, however, is a Goldsmith gem.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think sharing the same 4 core cast members and a writer is enough to make one thing a "spiritual successor" to another thing, even if that term is more often used for other ways two things are related.

Link to post
Share on other sites
58 minutes ago, Disco Stu said:

Fierce Creatures is a terrible movie that isn't fit to lick A Fish Called Wanda's boots

Duly noted

57 minutes ago, Jay said:

John Williams - Hook

 

Amazing

I hope by the end of the year we'll all be able to replace this by John Williams - Hook (LLL MM Edition)

Link to post
Share on other sites

Christopher Young’s The Fly II

 

Gorgeous horror scoring and perfect album arrangement/length. I got used to listening to other albums for horror scores that feel like a collection of jumpscare stingers, which made coming back to this one all the more refreshing for being honest-to-god actual music. I’m not sure where I’d rank it as far as Young’s works go, yet I oddly put this one on pretty often, especially for how soothing the second track is. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, Matt C said:

Spider-Man 3 -- Christopher Young

 

Still bummed that this doesn't have a proper release. He deconstructs and plays around with Elfman's thematic material more -- but still in that musical family. It's amazing how many themes Young composed for the film (that got cut out) -- and it's all wonderful. The lack of electronic percussion doesn't hurt the score.

 

I actually prefer his arrangement of Elfman's opening titles theme over Elfman's original two.

 

Which set did you listen to? There's so many boots out there that it's hard to find a particularly solid presentation that isn't fan made or a rarer promo. I suppose the 16 track Young set is the closest we'll have to a proper album, even if I find some track placement and edit choices questionable.

 

I like where Young had decided to take the characters sound wise, even if it's partly just speculation on my part. Given Peter would be in a different place with MJ and May, it makes a lot of sense that they would all have new identities. Pete in particular now getting his own theme separate from Spidey, and this love theme that varies depending on which character he talks to. While the loss of the latter is a shame, the way they went about editing the score in the theatrical cut heavily diminishes the former as well. It essentially means nothing when you last hear it in the film.

 

The lack of any prevalent electronics is an interesting aspect, given it makes it a unique entry among every other Spidey score that incorporates them in some manner. Raimi really pushed Young to be his classic self to the fullest.

 

5 hours ago, Matt C said:

Quality of the film aside, it doesn't help that portions of Young's score was either dropped in favor of re-using Elfman's material from the first two films or re-recordings of his motifs.

 

But the action scenes are pretty much intact, save for one bit during the construction site finale.

 

Yeah. As much as using the Symbiote dissonance during Peter facing the separated monstrosity makes more sense, I really do miss the full blown statement of the Venom theme that was in Final Battle Pt. 5. It's an underrated part of the score that would've been nice to hear more of in film.

 

5 hours ago, Tom Guernsey said:

I do quite enjoy Young’s take although I didn’t find that it meshed that well with the Elfman material. Particularly prominent when the opening titles go off at a tangent and then just as abruptly dives straight back into the Elfman. 

 

The arrangement of the main titles still leave me a bit conflicted. While I do love the additions of the Black Suit and Sandman themes, and can appreciate the subtle arrangement changes in the Spidey theme, I can't help but get slight cheap re-recording vibes with it. A lot of the nice little flourishes and touches Elfman has just aren't here, and as such lack a bit of the color of the two previous arrangements. But given that, I still think there's plenty to like about it, and my love of the score prevents me from really judging it much.

 

As for the rest of the score integrating Elfman's material, I think it greatly depends on what presentation you go with. It's definitely a lot more cohesive in CY's unaltered score, where a lot of the newer stuff gets more focus, so usually he is more careful about his uses of past themes. There's not too many moments where he simply copy and pastes notes (which does happen), so I'd say it's balanced tastefully. The theatrical edit is more conflicting, given that the Lurie and Denney material do stick out a lot, in spite of their effort to blend things together better. Not to mention the rather odd places where they decide to keep the temp track (presumably for budget reasons). So hearing Aunt May's theme from 1&2 as a transition cue for instance just leaves me scratching my head. And yet, I don't think it works too badly when listening to it like that, so it's definitely a "your mileage may vary" thing.

 

5 hours ago, Falco said:

It meshes fine for me. (I know some Elfman material was shoved in later by additional composers through rewrites and inserts though)

It was cool that the Editor's Cut restored a lot of Young's score

 

Don't forget the Peter Vs. Harry Goblin fight has an insert of the Elfman theme.

 

Yup! The Editor's Cut and the 4K alt audio were great in finally giving us Young's (mostly) original vision, even if some of it could've afforded to be a bit louder in the mix. I even used them for my edit to get some of the still missing cues (for which we would only be hearing for the first time with these releases).

 

That insert was actually done by Young himself. The only track to do so, as the other additions (which the film does credit) are usually either whole cue replacements for the quieter scenes or parts in larger cues that'd be less busy, and thus easy to throw in an insert.

 

(My least favorite choice remains Debney doing a full blown re-recording of the "Alone" track from SM1, yet the film sticks with the original recording. Probably could've saved some money there if they weren't gonna put him in another scene instead.)

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, HunterTech said:

 

Which set did you listen to? There's so many boots out there that it's hard to find a particularly solid presentation that isn't fan made or a rarer promo. I suppose the 16 track Young set is the closest we'll have to a proper album, even if I find some track placement and edit choices questionable.


I just listened to a YT playlist. Not lossless, I know, but I’m holding out for a proper release with Elfman’s themes and Young’s full score intact.

Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Kasey Kockroach said:

Christopher Young’s The Fly II

 

Gorgeous horror scoring and perfect album arrangement/length. I got used to listening to other albums for horror scores that feel like a collection of jumpscare stingers, which made coming back to this one all the more refreshing for being honest-to-god actual music. I’m not sure where I’d rank it as far as Young’s works go, yet I oddly put this one on pretty often, especially for how soothing the second track is. 

 

As much as I love some of the itty bits from Shore's score, I return to Young's entry way more often. Very good album.

Link to post
Share on other sites
20 minutes ago, Unlucky Bastard said:

 

As much as I love some of the itty bits from Shore's score, I return to Young's entry way more often. Very good album.

 

Indeed. Perfect assembly. I love the set with both scores, but like you said, there's a lot more repeat value in Young's score, for some reason

Link to post
Share on other sites
36 minutes ago, Matt C said:

I just listened to a YT playlist. Not lossless, I know, but I’m holding out for a proper release with Elfman’s themes and Young’s full score intact.

 

I should probably upload my custom set there at some point. Partly because the content ID system has been interesting when it comes to detecting SM3 material (read: it actually gives you the raw cue numbers for some tracks). But also because with how disorganized and mislabeled many tracks are, it'd be nice to have a copy that addressed those issues, plus some neat edits and unique variants that would be new to there.

 

Alternatively, you could probably find it on that website tied to some random Ninty franchise (though I really need to post the update first).

Link to post
Share on other sites
Quote

Elfman’s themes and Young’s full score intact.

 

That's something I never fully thought about, in terms of what an official release would actually look like. It always was rumored that Elfman himself personally barred there being such, though there was also some writings that suggested Sony simply didn't think there'd be enough interest in it. While a proper expansion would likely have the full score + the additional material, the amount of alts and film versions of cues would make for a seriously hefty set if it wanted to display everything noteworthy. And for condensed OSTs, I tried making one that removed Elfman, but he ultimately still stuck by in two tracks, so that shouldn't be too hard to make a solid presentation. I'd buy it even if it was poorly handled.

Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Kasey Kockroach said:

Christopher Young’s The Fly II

 

Gorgeous horror scoring and perfect album arrangement/length. I got used to listening to other albums for horror scores that feel like a collection of jumpscare stingers, which made coming back to this one all the more refreshing for being honest-to-god actual music. I’m not sure where I’d rank it as far as Young’s works go, yet I oddly put this one on pretty often, especially for how soothing the second track is. 

As ever, this heartbreaking scoring from Young is astonishing>

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

R-15198936-1588600561-7083.jpeg.jpg

 

Another Lai favourite while I was it. From 1969, and pointing towards the jazzy stylings of the New Wave films at the time, even if it's more 'popular' in tone than those. Love the baroque jazz melancholy of "Concerto pour la fin d'un amour".

Link to post
Share on other sites

No trek through early 90s family comedy and adventure scores would be complete without Randy Edelman's Kindergarten Cop, long a favorite of mine.

 

"Rain Ride" remains a bop

 

On 8/17/2018 at 11:53 AM, Disco Stu said:

I prefer "Rain Ride" from Maestro Edelman

 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Secret of NIMH - .jpg

Lovely score from Goldsmith. I remember this movie to be one of my favourites when I was young and listening back to this score just gave me goosebumps

 

4 minutes ago, Bespin said:

The Amazing Spider Bulge OST

Charlie and the Chocolate Factory OST

The Lost World OST

Batman Forever OST

 

20210429_123827.jpg

Nice Horner's score.

Meh Elfman's one is one of my arch enemies, I never succeed to get into that one outside of the movie (besides the Main Title)

TLW: :love2: (although wrong edition but one can't be perfect :P)

Forever was surprisingly good even though the movie was terrible

Link to post
Share on other sites

The Phantom Menace OST

 

81Vl2RQrZkL._SL1500_.jpg

 

It has been while since I last listened to the OST presentation, always resorting to fan edits of the complete thing whenever I want my fix of this music.

 

I find TPM to be an absolutely terrific score in its complete presentation, with a huge variety of colors, moods and dynamics, a great narrative flow (conveying a much, much better execution of the story than we were given in the film), at least a dozen highlights. It is simply one of the greatest fantasy/adventure scores ever written  and probably the single score with the biggest display of JW's command of the orchestra and its potential.

 

Some of this is lost when listening to the OST. But you know what? If one ignores all the missing music and disregards the proper narrative flow, this album is actually a really great listening experience. And some of the combined tracks still remain my favorite presentation of those very same tracks, namely:

 

The Sith Spacecraft and the Droid Battle

Panaka and the Queen's Protectors

 

And I would always want to see them included in the defnitive edition of this score.

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites

R-2165239-1267536625.jpeg.jpg

 

Just a bit of lovely morning Morricone to start the day. Although slightly ruined by noisy construction work outside. The soundtrack cover is very confusing, though. The four movies contained are 1943: UN INCONTRO, LA SCIANTOSA, CORREVA L'ANNO DI GRAZIA and L'AUTOMOBILE. LA SCIANTOSA is an alternative name for TRE DONNE (or part of a film series called TRE DONNE), and CORREVA sometimes appears without '1870' in the title. And the other two movies aren't mentioned on the cover at all.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.