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What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)


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The Adventures of Tintin and War Horse. 2011 was an excellent year for John Williams fans. Both albums are hugely enjoyable.   Karol

LOTR: The Fellowship of the Ring (CR) by Howard Shore   Damn, is this shit good. I've waxed enough poetic about these scores, but this time, I'm especially struck by how FOTR works as a mood

Elmer Bernstein - The Unused Scores   This set spans three Bernstein rejections, starting in 1985 - probably his first - to 1995, when he already became notorious for being thrown off as muc

55 minutes ago, May the Force be with You said:

I've seen the movie recently and found that there were terrific action cues and a really nice love theme so I've give this score a try and it turns out to be really good.

The highlights:

  • Septimus is an absolutly terrific action cue which appears a lot more in the movie than in the OST with more variations to it. It's IMO the best highlights of the score
  • Three Witches track is quite anxieting and a really nice touch
  • Flying Vessel is a really vibrant cue of call to adventure
  • Pirate Fight is a really nice and fun orchestration of the Can Can
  • Really liked the title Coronation which is a great way to end the album although the title is followed by a less interesting epilogue.

 

It's sometimes a bit simplistic and the temp track comes through more than twice, but it's a lovely score that fits the film perfectly - and like (and probably because of) the film, it's got a big heart, which makes it all work. I like that the Septimus music is written in 7/8.

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Morris. It's got a great theme.

 

4 hours ago, Marian Schedenig said:

It's sometimes a bit simplistic and the temp track comes through more than twice, but it's a lovely score that fits the film perfectly - and like (and probably because of) the film, it's got a big heart, which makes it all work. I like that the Septimus music is written in 7/8.

 

It's a score that's not without charm, but ultimately, I found it too generic.

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ab67616d0000b273645714c72da7de5ad142994e

 

A bit uneven, but the good parts are really good. Gaute continues to be one of best orchestral film composers in Norway. Solid and experienced grasp of melodies and full-bodied orchestrations.

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This is a short era of Thomas Newman’s career that I absolutely adore. After his 80’s efforts but pre-Shawshank. It’s a great time. Thor will agree, I’m sure.

 

B88AC8F9-A72F-4FE7-A85B-214C784C8B12.jpeg

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1 hour ago, LSH said:

This is a short era of Thomas Newman’s career that I absolutely adore. After his 80’s efforts but pre-Shawshank. It’s a great time. Thor will agree, I’m sure.

 

Absolutely. JOSH & SAM is excellent!

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ab67616d0000b273e30a1c06da2a3d3d09543f7c

 

A latter-day gem from Poledouris. The ethnically tinged, epic orchestral music is fine, but I actually prefer the electronic New Age vibe of the opening track "Legend of the Touch".

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4 hours ago, Thor said:

A latter-day gem from Poledouris. The ethnically tinged, epic orchestral music is fine, but I actually prefer the electronic New Age vibe of the opening track "Legend of the Touch".

 

The synth/percussion blend is very nice, something Poledouris was really skilled at.

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:music:The Rendezvous by Austin Wintory. Definitely one of the finest film scores of the 2010s. Unique colours and orchestration, it's a nice cross between arthouse drama and thriller. And a terrific album as well. Delicious.

 

Karol

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It's one of those that nobody knows, and from a film no one has seen. For once, I don't feel like this is intended to be an homage or even specific genre. The score feels to me like its own beast and taking advantage of its composer's personal voice. You have a handful of recognisable themes and some nice development throughout. It's grown-up and confident music with nice orchestrations and colours that you don't really see these days. Way above what you hear in Hollywood. The album is just about the right length and the recording is terrific. It's as good and imaginative as film music gets these days, just the right balance between high-brow sophistication and crowd-pleasing melody. It has this timeless sound that I love. Judging by the film's trailer, you can tell he Jerry Goldsmith-ed the shit out of this movie.

 

Given that they printed something like 500 copies and it still hasn't sold out after so many years just breaks my heart.

 

I'm pretty sure people like @publicistwill back me up on this. 

 

Karol

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R-2539801-1321281971.jpeg.jpg

 

Slow, dark and beautiful score from 2005 for this war drama, broken up with some dissonance towards the end - as usual with many Morricone albums.

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mbid-cb37a0dc-f736-41d7-94be-6492025336f

 

This 2011 score was my first discovery of Gaigne (I've since acquired many of his albums) -- it's all very European, rather stark, bleak and with a relatively small acoustic ensemble. But he always plays around with haunting chords and melodies. In the "Preisner tradition", so to speak.

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ab67616d0000b2739147c538cba7c9a3c327562b

 

Perhaps about 20 minutes too long, but I love Metheny's soft-strumming guitars for this 1999 movie -- occasionally augmented by strings or piano. Santaolalla before there was Santaolalla.

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Ooof, I haven't posted in this thread in a while.  Let me see if I can remember what I've been listening to for the past few weeks that I can talk about

 

 

John Powell - How To Train Your Dragon (Varese Deluxe, just some highlights)

 

I think this is a score that I fall more in love with every time I hear it!  I swear every time I notice a new theme variation somewhere I hadn't picked up on previously

 

 

John Powell - Solo (a fun playlist of just all the big action tracks)

 

What an action powerhouse!

 

 

John Williams - Images (Quartet remaster)

 

Weird, spooky score. The new remaster sounds great!

 

 

Various - Final Fantasy VII Remake Intergrade Digital Mini OST

 

Eh.  The two "Descendant of Shinobi" tracks are really great and some of the cutscene music is interesting, but a lot of the rest is really bad.  Retreads of Remake cues with awful new electronics over them or something.  What a bummer.  Hopefully the 3CD OST is better than this....

 

 

Monomer - The Mummy Demastered (OST)

 

Hmm. I heard some cues from this on a podcast and really liked them, then listened to the OST and wasn't impressed.  Maybe I just wasn't in the right mood.

 

 

Nobuo Uematsu & Yasonori Mitsuda - Front Mission: Gun Hazard (OST)

One of my favorite scores of all time.  Super great, was a pleasure to listen to after many months of not hearing it.

 

 

Yasunori Mitsuda / ACE(TOMOri KUDO, CHiCO) / Kenji Hiramatsu / Manami Kiyota - Xenoblade Chronicles 2 (OST)

 

Great!

 

 

John Williams - Sleepers (OST)

 

A gem in Williams' 90s output I wasn't really familiar with before.  After finally seeing the movie I checked out the OST, and loved it.  Powerful stuff!

 

 

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ab67616d0000b27399c3dc9ca03e6e58ad09c31e

 

Always been a sucker for elegant, sweeping British scores with melancholic strings and cautious piano flurries. Cantelon is sorta another Christopher Gunning.

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1 hour ago, Thor said:

ab67616d0000b27399c3dc9ca03e6e58ad09c31e

 

Always been a sucker for elegant, sweeping British scores with melancholic strings and cautious piano flurries. Cantelon is sorta another Christopher Gunning.

 

Sounds like this would have been a job for Richard Robbins, if he was still around. 

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Yes, except he would probably have given it a more minimalistic slant. Cantelon is more "classical", if you will. More traditional and neoromantic.

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R-6721809-1425320754-9586.jpeg.jpg

 

Small cover always means rare score. But this is a gem - Zimmer's 90s drama scores have this kind of airy quality with a pop-infused flavour that I just love.

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50 minutes ago, Thor said:

R-6721809-1425320754-9586.jpeg.jpg

 

Small cover always means rare score. But this is a gem - Zimmer's 90s drama scores have this kind of airy quality with a pop-infused flavour that I just love.

That cover is super sinister alongside that title. 

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Ha, ha. Never thought of that.

 

eaec145f-ccd1-457d-820e-c4e4b1024aa26491

 

This was a neat surprise, a recent reissue from BSX of the 1996 score.  I've always loved Frank's work on those Steven Seagal movies, but that's about my only exposure to him. This is more "John Williamsey", if you will, and he nails it. Nothing groundbreaking, but it's excellent pastiche. All very 90s, in a good sense. And perfect album sequencing/length at 38 minutes!

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ab67616d0000b27334a1793e3e3def890bb8ad1f

 

A highlight from 2018. Quaeschning - currently the lead man in Tangerine Dream after Edgar's passing - scores this relatively obscure thriller (not to be confused with the Martin Freeman movie), and it's all very much in TD's spirit, like in the sequencer-driven, 16-minute track "Wanderbaustelle".

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I never met Quaeschning, but in the 90s I practiced shortly with a band with three guys, drummer and two guitar players, who before had him as keyboarder in their band.

 

But both bands split quickly. The first band was not good enough for Quaeschning, and I was not good enough for the second one.

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I started at the guitar, then switched to the bass, which suited me much better.

I wrote most of the songs with a lot of complicated guitar chords. But the singer always asked us to transpose everything to her voice range. So, I was happy with the bass. There it was easier.

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25 minutes ago, GerateWohl said:

I never met Quaeschning, but in the 90s I practiced shortly with a band with three guys, drummer and two guitar players, who before had him as keyboarder in their band.

 

But both bands split quickly. The first band was not good enough for Quaeschning, and I was not good enough for the second one.

 

At least you're good enough for JWFan.

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Ba, last year in your competition you had to listen to my piano skills. 

So, you can imagine, I was never good at performing live.

That's luckily not a requirement here.

I can listen to John Williams music hands-free, even two pieces at a time.

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