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What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)


Ollie

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On 07/01/2022 at 6:46 PM, Bespin said:

An Howard Shore Party! :flameblob:

 

  • The Silence of the Lambs (OST program using the expanded versions)
  • Naked Lunch (Collector's Ed)
  • Crash (Collector's Ed)

 

Ok, so to day, let's continue in this "Thriller" mode!

  • Howard Shore - The Departed OST
  • Howard Shore - Se7en (Collector's Ed)
  • James Newton Howard - The Village OST
  • John Williams - Minority Report (expanded)

 

 

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Joe Pera Talks With You - Ryan Dann 

 

There are some seriously lovely cues written for this Adult Swim series, one of my favorite shows I’ve discovered over the past year.  I know nothing about Ryan Dann, but he does a great job on this series.

 

“Fall Loop” is my favorite (it’s also from my favorite episode)

 

 

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Pretty effective compilation!

 

And containing music from scores I didn't know, great discovery... and the fact that few tracks are mixed together for a better listening experience... that's sweet!

 

Danny Elfman - Music For A Darkened Theatre (Film & Television Music Volume One)

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Oh yea great album, one of the first film score CDs I ever got

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On a compilation, yes, why not?

 

I imagine Elfman saying: "A compilation? Oh, you not gonna put all the songs one after the others like that, aren't you? We'll mix them a bit...".

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Volume 2 is a bit less effective because the suites are so much longer, and the scores not always as condensable to any form of highlight assembly as his earlier scores were, but the end of the second discs with tons of odds and ends that would never get a release anywhere otherwise is pretty awesome to have

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I sold SCISSORHANDS because the suite is so good.

Same with MI.

I own BLACK BEAUTY but I could have easily lived happily with the suite. Same with CLAIBORNE.

I also love BATMAN: ten minutes sums up the film nicely!

UNTIL I bought the LLL , it was eenuf.

 

I love collections like this and GOLDSMITH AT FOX.

They allow fans to enjoy scores without having to own every single 😊one.

 

Plus, you great a greater variety of music listening to one disc of  a compilation than one disc of an ost.

 

2 hours ago, bruce marshall said:

 

 

 

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13 hours ago, bruce marshall said:

I sold SCISSORHANDS because the suite is so good.

 

I did that with Horner's Casper.

38 minutes ago, crocodile said:

Zulu

Spider-Man: No Way Home

 

In the notifications I read "Zulu Spider-Man". I want to see THAT movie now.

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The Perfect Storm by James Horner

 

Recall reading old posts about how this score is too schmaltzy, and now it seems as though folks are begging for these kinds of scores to come back. Suckers! 

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5 minutes ago, Kasey Kockroach said:

The Perfect Storm by James Horner

 

Recall reading old posts about how this score is too schmaltzy, and now it seems as though folks are begging for these kinds of scores to come back. Suckers! 

 

They won't, but schmaltzy and repetitive as it is, it's miles beyond what passes for dramatic film scores these days, construction-wise.

 

A trifle, but kinda entertaining.

 

 

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Saving Private Ryan (LLL) by John Williams

Perfect by every aspect...

 

Not with my Wife You Don't by John Williams

A really fun score, one of the best Williams of the 60's along with How to Steel a Million and The Reivers

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Two more physical CDs

 

Robert Ziegler conducts the Slovak National Symphony Orchestra - Music From The Star Wars Saga The Essential Collection

 

Album starts off pretty good but then gets very inconsistent; Some tracks are nicely played and others are not, and also the selections they chose and the order they present them in gets kinda weird.  But it's really nice to get a proper recording of the updated Han Solo and the Princess, and the original and prequel trilogy recordings are pretty good

 

 

Carter Burwell - The Alamo

 

Hey, this is nice music!  I think this might be the first Carter Burwell album I've ever heard.  I'd listen to it again!

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Three more!  Making real progress now!

 

James Horner - Southpaw

 

This has got to be one of the least-discussed scores of his entire career.  And I've never heard of anyone actually seeing the movie (I haven't).  I... actually really liked this?  I mean, it's synthy and subdued, and not really what you put on a Horner score for, but I liked hearing something unusual from him and it really kinda worked.  Plus there are some classic Horner-isms in here :)

 

 

John Powell and David Buckley - Jason Bourne

 

Woah, I liked this too.  It's way less action packed than I was expecting, but I was really digging the vibe.  I'm sure it's mostly similar to his previous Bourne scores, but I honestly haven't spent too much time on those, so to me this was all cool stuff.  And I really liked the Moby remix at the end!

 

 

Michael Giacchino - Bad Times At The El Royale

 

I also liked this!  Somehow I was in a mood for subdued scores today I guess.  Usually I enjoy Giacchino's big blockbuster style the most by far, but today this interesting score where he goes outside his comfort zone hit the right notes for me.  I barely even remember the movie but this album is nice, if quite long.

 

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Day of the Doctor (Murray Gold) - To my surprise, I'd only listened to this once. Perhaps not my favourite of the DW scores that have received a complete/one-off release, there's still plenty of good stuff here, as usual with Gold's DW music, especially 2.47 billion and the final few tracks. However, I think he saved his best stuff for Smith's regeneration episode, Time of the Doctor.

 

The Snowman and the Snow Dog (Ilan Eshkeri) - Delightful follow up to Howard Blake's classic original even if it's not nearly as memorable. Probably a wise choice not to try for another Walking in the Air, instead a opting for something closer to a Sigur Ros/Jonsi type effort (think the lower key HTTYD end credit songs).

 

A River Runs Through It (Mark Isham) - Charming folksy score that, in the best possible way, sounds exactly as you imagine. Strings, guitars and a few source songs that work alongside the underscore.

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49 minutes ago, Tom Guernsey said:

Day of the Doctor (Murray Gold) - To my surprise, I'd only listened to this once. Perhaps not my favourite of the DW scores that have received a complete/one-off release, there's still plenty of good stuff here, as usual with Gold's DW music, especially 2.47 billion and the final few tracks. However, I think he saved his best stuff for Smith's regeneration episode, Time of the Doctor.

 

I love Clara's theme but I really wish they had gone with Gold's original opening. Mr. Gold! Where is season 10?!?

 

Peter Pan (2003) James Newton Howard

A few things made me think of this this week. I haven't listened to it in ages. A delightful score. Some of the pirate stuff covers the same ground as Treasure Planet. But I love Treasure Planet so I don't care.

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6 minutes ago, Tallguy said:

 

I love Clara's theme but I really wish they had gone with Gold's original opening. Mr. Gold! Where is season 10?!?

 

 

What did you mean by the original opening? And totally agreed on Season 10! Maybe if he comes back with RTD he'll get his arse in gear for that final release of his original tenure.

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2 hours ago, GerateWohl said:

In the meantime, when I listen to this album, I start at track 2, for the simple reasons, I heard Hymn to the Fallen too often, there are better recordings of it, it gets repeated at the end of the album anyway and I realised, that it somehow distracts my attention for the other tracks.

 

Sorry for dragging out the other discussion again - but I've long thought that by far the biggest influence Orff's Carmina Burana had on Williams is his annoying tendency to duplicate the end credits/concert suite as the album's title track. It makes sense for Orff's work because of the wheel of fortune metaphor, but in Williams's case it doesn't. I suspect it's partly a remnant from the LP era where an "album" was typically comprised of two short suites (though mainly for music that was created *for* the album presentation, obviously not for "classical" works of independent length that were released on LP, and that's why I also dispute its validity for film scores), and partly a result of Williams disregarding the quality/integrity of his own underscore and wanting to give the spotlight to the "proper" concert suite. Even then I find the duplication of the track pointless and a waste of either space (in case other cues were dropped to make room for the duplicate track) or time (if it wasn't), and generally harmful to the listening experience. Especially with scores that have strong thematic development (i.e. most of Williams's longer narrative scores), where the "score proper" carefully balances when and how to present its theme(s) in the dramatic (and musical) narrative. You wouldn't open an album of Beethoven's 9th with the full Freude chorus - you wouldn't even open the final movement that way, because Beethoven gradually introduces and develops the theme before presenting the first "full" statement.

 

And it's not about me refusing to let the music stand alone without the film - I'm very much for that, but I also maintain that with narrative scores, the musical narrative is usually based on the film's narrative, so even though you can divorce the music (or most of it) from the film, you should retain its overall structure so as to preserve its inherent dramatic arc. And that goes both ways - hurting the musical narrative in the film can hurt the film. I'm still ambivalent about Shore playing each film's significant "main" theme over the LOTR EE titles when he originally carefully introduced each of them much later in the narrative.

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1 hour ago, May the Force be with You said:

Rosewood (LLL) by John Williams

Another masterpiece from the Maestro that I didn't listen to since a while. The gospel song are absolutely beautiful espacially Look Down Lord.

1997 will remain as one of the best year of John Williams just because of the high versatility of all his projects

 

This one is interesting to listen in C&C.

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37 minutes ago, Tom Guernsey said:

 

What did you mean by the original opening? And totally agreed on Season 10! Maybe if he comes back with RTD he'll get his arse in gear for that final release of his original tenure.

 

The track I.M. Foreman has the score Gold originally wrote for Clara riding to the TARDIS that was replaced with Clara's theme. It's Him (The Majestic Tale) also has unused score.

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41 minutes ago, Tallguy said:

 

The track I.M. Foreman has the score Gold originally wrote for Clara riding to the TARDIS that was replaced with Clara's theme. It's Him (The Majestic Tale) also has unused score.

Aha, gotcha. Will have to watch that episode again sometime. After my recent Capaldi re-watch I might do a Matt Smith re-watch...

 

And agreed on most of @Marian Schedenig's comments on JW's predilection for bookending albums with concert versions. Sometimes they can function as a kind of overture that introduces the main themes and as an end credit suite afterwards, but both isn't necessary. Also slightly annoying when he adds an extra 30 second solo (such as the Patriot) so you feel compelled to keep both versions in your library!

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1 hour ago, Tallguy said:

 

The track I.M. Foreman has the score Gold originally wrote for Clara riding to the TARDIS that was replaced with Clara's theme. It's Him (The Majestic Tale) also has unused score.

Fun fact: Foreman is misspelled as "Forman", in REMEMBRANCE OF THE DALEKS :lol:

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55 minutes ago, Marian Schedenig said:

 

Sorry for dragging out the other discussion again - but I've long thought that by far the biggest influence Orff's Carmina Burana had on Williams is his annoying tendency to duplicate the end credits/concert suite as the album's title track. It makes sense for Orff's work because of the wheel of fortune metaphor, but in Williams's case it doesn't. I suspect it's partly a remnant from the LP era where an "album" was typically comprised of two short suites (though mainly for music that was created *for* the album presentation, obviously not for "classical" works of independent length that were released on LP, and that's why I also dispute its validity for film scores), and partly a result of Williams disregarding the quality/integrity of his own underscore and wanting to give the spotlight to the "proper" concert suite. Even then I find the duplication of the track pointless and a waste of either space (in case other cues were dropped to make room for the duplicate track) or time (if it wasn't), and generally harmful to the listening experience. Especially with scores that have strong thematic development (i.e. most of Williams's longer narrative scores), where the "score proper" carefully balances when and how to present its theme(s) in the dramatic (and musical) narrative. You wouldn't open an album of Beethoven's 9th with the full Freude chorus - you wouldn't even open the final movement that way, because Beethoven gradually introduces and develops the theme before presenting the first "full" statement.

 

And it's not about me refusing to let the music stand alone without the film - I'm very much for that, but I also maintain that with narrative scores, the musical narrative is usually based on the film's narrative, so even though you can divorce the music (or most of it) from the film, you should retain its overall structure so as to preserve its inherent dramatic arc. And that goes both ways - hurting the musical narrative in the film can hurt the film. I'm still ambivalent about Shore playing each film's significant "main" theme over the LOTR EE titles when he originally carefully introduced each of them much later in the narrative.

This habit might also be related to the fashion in the 90s not to start the movie with a big main title credit and big opening music, that fashion that was revived by Williams with Star Wars from the golden Hollywood aera.

With the movies more and more having no main title suites and no ouvertures anymore, often score in the movie starting first after ten fifteen minutes after the movies beginning for an old fashioned composer like Williams this repetition of the end credits is probably an appropriate way to open a soundtrack album.

 

I never understood why on the Spacecamp soundtrack the second LP side started with the end credit suite. He could have put it at the beginning or the end of the album. Strange structuring of albums.  

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1 minute ago, GerateWohl said:

I never understood why on the Spacecamp soundtrack the second LP side started with the end credit suite. He could have put it at the beginning or the end of the album. Strange structuring of albums.  

It was a personal choice, I guess.

I am assuming that JW sequenced the record?

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Schindler's List (LLL) by John Williams

Final pick of the my Williams' rerun featuring previously Stanley & Iris and Rosewood.

This score is simply perfect! It's always a true pleasure to listen to it, Perlman's solos are absolutely gorgeous what a terrif duo they made

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On 12/01/2022 at 2:38 PM, badbu said:

Probably my favorite Thomas Newman Score :-)

 

 

 

Stunning opening cue, I just wish Newman had revisited some of these ideas later in the score.

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Dennis the Menace (Jerry Goldsmith) - my nephew is a massive Dennis the Menace fan, but the UK version (with Gnasher!) rather than the American comic, which were both (unbelievably) debuted on the same day. In the history of unlikely coincidences, that has to be perhaps one of the most unlikely. I think this can be added to the several projects where he ended up scoring movies that were made to cash in on a more high profile film that JW scored* namely Home Alone  but the discussion about the coincidental release of the comics reminded me to give Jerry's charming score a listen. From the composer of Planet of the Apes... it's Dennis the Menace. It might be a score for a throwaway kids movie but it's a lot of fun, with a memorable harmonica led main theme, a nicely understated piano theme and some expertly executed Mickey Mousing action scoring sure to delight anyone who enjoys his Joe Dante scores. I'm sure I'm not alone in wishing Jerry had scored some more highly regarded films with high profile directors more befitting his immense talents, but even on something this dire, he still gave it his all. Lovely stuff.

 

*to add to Raiders/King Solomon's Mines, Superman/Supergirl, Jurassic Park/Congo, and, arguably Star Wars/Star TrekThe Swarm/Other Irwin Allen Movies etc.

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Superman (LLL) by John Williams

Simply the greatest super-hero score of all time and one of the best Williams.

The LLL presentation is almost perfect (some of Williams materials have been left on the boxset of the two sequels). I really think that MM did a perfect restauration of this score, can't believe it was recorded more than 40 years ago...

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1 hour ago, May the Force be with You said:

Superman (LLL) by John Williams

Simply the greatest super-hero score of all time and one of the best Williams.

The LLL presentation is almost perfect (some of Williams materials have been left on the boxset of the two sequels). I really think that MM did a perfect restauration of this score, can't believe it was recorded more than 40 years ago...

 

The fanfare somehow sounds the worst but luckily the sound gets better after that. 

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1 hour ago, AC1 said:

The sound of CD 1 is better.

 

You must be mixing them up, because the sound of the LSO album has always been fine, and while I haven't listened to the LLL release, I'm pretty sure it still sounds better there than the film tracks on disc 1 - and your post shows the Varese cover, where the film tracks sound just bad.

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3 minutes ago, Marian Schedenig said:

 

You must be mixing them up, because the sound of the LSO album has always been fine, and while I haven't listened to the LLL release, I'm pretty sure it still sounds better there than the film tracks on disc 1 - and your post shows the Varese cover, where the film tracks sound just bad.

Yeah, the LSO version sounds better than the original tracks, a much richer and fuller presence. Funnily enough I gave it a listen myself yesterday. Such a great score and one of those JW efforts that’s probably virtually unknown outside his fan base. It’s a shame that Dracula doesn’t sounds as rich as The Fury given they are from the same era, orchestra and recording studio (I think). Same goes for Empire I guess… one day…

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I worry sometimes that The Fury might be my favorite John Williams score.
Yeah, yeah, I know, how predictable, his favorite is one of his few horror scores. 

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