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What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)


Ollie

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3 hours ago, GerateWohl said:

I can connect to that. 

And here my confession: I am usually not a fan of when Williams uses the celeste. I know, it is somehow an expression of innocence and childhood. But it is one of my least favourite stylistic devices in his music. 

He rarely uses it these days (2001-2024).

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7 hours ago, The Great Gonzales said:

He rarely uses it these days (2001-2024).

But he did prominently in The Fabelmanns.

And doesn't the Dial of Destiny OST directly start off with it?

I mean, it is not something I hate or so. And I actually like it at the beginning of Hedwig's Theme. Even though I probably would have prefered a piano. I am just more a piano fan than a celeste fan.

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4 hours ago, GerateWohl said:

But he did prominently in The Fabelmanns.

And doesn't the Dial of Destiny OST directly start off with it?

I mean, it is not something I hate or so. And I actually like it at the beginning of Hedwig's Theme. Even though I probably would have prefered a piano. I am just more a piano fan than a celeste fan.

I was being facetious, as he uses a keyboard patch for celeste a lot.

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On 11/06/2024 at 6:45 AM, Bespin said:

In the last few months, I was very busy with Aznavour's centenary, so I almost didn't listen to any film scores.

 

This morning, I returned to some recent classics (the "J" team!).

  • John Williams - Indiana Jones and TDOD
  • John Barry - Chaplin (Expanded)
  • JNH - Night After Night
  • John Williams - Hook (Expanded)

 

Part II of my recap.

John Williams - The Fabelmans
JNH - The Secrets of Dumbledore
John Williams - Amistad (Expanded)
Nino Rota - The Godfather (Expanded)
Jerry Goldsmith - L.A. Confidential (Expanded)
John Barry - Mary, Queen of Scots (Expanded)
James Horner - Willow (Expanded)

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19 minutes ago, Bespin said:

Part II of my recap.

Has anyone told you, Bes that you have a fricking great taste in film music? Just asking.

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Sky Captain and the World Tomorrow. Might be bit overcooked in a couple of places but, for my money, one of the most fun throwback scores of the 21st century. For all its references, it still feels quite memorable. Hard to believe it is now 20 years old!

 

Karol

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55 minutes ago, Bespin said:

 

Part II of my recap.

John Williams - The Fabelmans
JNH - The Secrets of Dumbledore
John Williams - Amistad (Expanded)
Nino Rota - The Godfather (Expanded)
Jerry Goldsmith - L.A. Confidential (Expanded)
John Barry - Mary, Queen of Scots (Expanded)
James Horner - Willow (Expanded)

All of those scores are great. Some more, others less, but overall I like them all.

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55 minutes ago, Edmilson said:

All of those scores are great. Some more, others less, but overall I like them all.

 

It's funny, but it's like your posts! :lol:

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On 12/6/2024 at 5:45 PM, crocodile said:

Two excellent Christopher Gordon scores for me tonight - Moby Dick and Daybreakers. Delicious, full-bodied music. 

 

Karol


Daybreakers should’ve been that Gordon score that Hollywood should taken notice. The action music is so dynamic and wonderfully composed— and the Australian session players blew me away.

 

He should be the next Benjamin Wallfisch IMO.

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The field. Why do only the strings have reverb and are the uillean pipes seemingly recorded in a separate room far from the other one?

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14 hours ago, Edmilson said:

Judge Dreed (2015 Intrada) by Alan Silvestri

 

Book 01.jpg

 

Film scores doesn't get manlier than this. Silvestri extracts every last drop of testosterone with his theme. His orchestra of over 100 musicians (actually, two orchestras in London and LA) plays the typical Silvestrian action music, and I pity those poor brass players. Just listen to 3:57 at "Council Chaos - Revised" to get a sense of what the brass musicians had to do. Lots and lots of percussion as well, making me wish I was at the recording sessions.

 

Excellent recording as well, you get to listen with clarity to the different sections of the orchestra(s).

 

It's interesting that, among the Silvestri canon, Dredd is part of his most military-driven action scores, a direct descendant from Predator and a clear precursor of G.I. Joe, Captain America and The Avengers. It's a somewhat different style than when he wants to be more swashbuckling (BTTF, The Mummy Returns, Ready Player One) or epic (Van Helsing, Beowulf).

 

 

I am always feeling like I'm unfairly evaluating Silvestri as an overall B minus composer.  But I think it's because there are a lot of his scores I simply haven't heard.  This is one of them.  Wish it wasn't OOP.  And I know, I can find a way to sample it, but weirdly I avoid that because then I will want to spend a stupid amount on an OOP disc if I like it.

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19 hours ago, Edmilson said:

Book 01.jpg

 

One of my favourite Silvestri scores. I'm not generally big on Silvestri, but this one I like a lot. Block War was my favourite track on the original album, so New Order Montage alone was worth the price of the expansion. And the Goldsmith trailer, of course.

 

19 hours ago, Edmilson said:

Excellent recording as well, you get to listen with clarity to the different sections of the orchestra(s).

 

Recorded by Dennis Sands, like many Silvestri scores. Always a plus.

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8 hours ago, bollemanneke said:

The field. Why do only the strings have reverb and are the uillean pipes seemingly recorded in a separate room far from the other one?

Maybe they were so loud, like how the wind instrument used for Sauron's theme in LOTR was ear splittingly loud..

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There's still plenty of harp in the BFG, and On Willow and Birches wasn't that long ago. He's always liked the celeste, but they have very different colors.

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13 hours ago, Andy said:

I am always feeling like I'm unfairly evaluating Silvestri as an overall B minus composer.  But I think it's because there are a lot of his scores I simply haven't heard.  This is one of them.  Wish it wasn't OOP.  And I know, I can find a way to sample it, but weirdly I avoid that because then I will want to spend a stupid amount on an OOP disc if I like it.

But the OST is still available very cheaply. It has eight score tracks and really nice songs. I recommend that.

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To be honest, the OST offers a nice trim selection. Silvestri tends to work better on curated programs for the most part.

 

Karol

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On 8/6/2024 at 4:02 PM, Andy said:


image.jpeg

 

 

I wonder if the Varese re-recording has a better flow.  This seems to me a case where the score got a reputation because of scarcity and Disney. 
 

There are lots of good Bernstein moments. It’s not a slog.   But there are plenty of fantasy films of that era with more staying power and substance. 
 

This makes me want to get ahold of the old Varese and compare. 


The Varese re-recording has a better flow and incorporates the highlights well, which prunes out the fat. It sounds bigger than the original recording too.

 

 

Death Becomes Her - Alan Silvestri 

 

It’s a delightful little score but Silvestri tended to mickey mouse the more comedic scenes of the film which can get overbearing (with the scratchy violins, brass hits and timpani rolls). Love the sensual theme for Isabella Rossellini’s character. 

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I always find the moment at 2:41 fascinating:

 

On the one hand, that switch to minor is so musically fitting that you almost wouldn't notice it. On the other hand, the mood of the music changes so completely and suddenly, that listening to it immediately puts that fight scene into my head, even when I otherwise don't think of the film at all.

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IMG_0452.jpeg

This tiny score is one of Alan Silvestri’s finest work. Basically one gentle theme and its variations, romantic, sad, simple, emotional, powerful. Beautiful.

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33 minutes ago, Davis said:

IMG_0452.jpeg

This tiny score is one of Alan Silvestri’s finest work. Basically one gentle theme and its variations, romantic, sad, simple, emotional, powerful. Beautiful.

And later clearly temp tracked into Avengers: Endgame.

 

 

 

Karol

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Could be, or maybe Silvestri just thought he wrote something original and it’s similar to his previous theme. Composers sometimes subconsciously, unintentionally copy themselves. 

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I've been reading a lot in the past few weeks and had some music to accompany that (pretty much all of these were the main programmes from the expansions):

 

Dances With Wolves

Seance On a Wet Afternoon

Far and Away

Minority Report

Empire of the Sun

Jaws

Jaws 2

Jaws 3-D

Jaws: The Revenge

The Acolyte

The Orville

Oppenheimer

Casper

Windtalkers

Amistad

Marco Beltrami: Music For Film

The Golden Compass

Jumanji

Heavy Metal

Torn Curtain

The Sand Pebbles

Nightbreed

Something Wicked This Way Comes

Final Symphony - Music from Final Fantasy VI, VII and X

Final Symphony II - Music from Final Fantasy V, VIII, IX and XIII

Predator

Predator 2

Predators

The Predator

 

Karol

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You read a lot indeed, that’s a lot of scores. Were you reading sci-fi and horror? 

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6 minutes ago, filmmusic said:

I at least, can't..

Me, neither. If I’m listening to music, I’m concentrating on it, even someone talking next to me distracts me. Same thing while reading: I can’t concentrate on the music. I need silence to read. But I guess others  don’t.

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6 minutes ago, Edmilson said:

Legends of the Fall (Expanded) by :james:

 

cover.jpg

 

My favorite James Horner score and one of my very favorite scores of all time. It's just magnificent. There isn't a single second of music that is "bad" or uninteresting. From the majestic epic moments to the darker or more intimate ones, it all flows effortlessly. 

 

The old OST has a wonderful and satifying listening experience, but the expanded edition contains so much wonderful unreleased cues and, as I said, it's never less than great.

 

Happy 20th anniversary!

 

Flesh + Blood by Basil Poledouris

 

Flesh + Blood.jpg

 

Someone mentioned this score in another thread, don't know which, a few days ago and I decided to revisit it (also, it's been years since I've last heard a BP score).

 

It's kinda like Conan where the whole score sounds so authentically medieval and classical music-like, but it's never boring. Poledouris manages to make all very satisfying and emotionally engaging.

 

Makes me wish to hear what he could do for Game of Thrones for example (a medieval-inspired saga that, like this forgotten Paul Verhoeven movie, also have lots of sex, violence, amoral characters...). A collaboration with Ridley Scott in one of his epics could've been nice as well (sorry HGW).

Legends of the Fall is indeed superb but mostly commenting on Flesh + Blood which I’m currently listening to and was going to post about. I still think i slightly prefer it to Conan even though I know that Conan is the more sophisticated and varied score. I do wonder if a lot of that has to do with the performance. Obviously the original recording has its issues and the more recent recording rectified many of them but neither can really compete with the LSO who performed F+B. The recording is top notch too. 

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35 minutes ago, filmmusic said:

How can you read AND listen to scores at the same time?

It seems to me, that you can't pay attention to one of them.

I at least, can't..

I mean it's background music....

29 minutes ago, Davis said:

Me, neither. If I’m listening to music, I’m concentrating on it, even someone talking next to me distracts me. Same thing while reading: I can’t concentrate on the music. I need silence to read. But I guess others  don’t.

Personally, I am the other way around, I need something to do, to distract me from focusing on the music too much, in a way that it becomes "unnatural"

 

0f745458-b755-4710-96e9-1fd4d2959595_tex

 

or else I end up falling asleep (due to enjoyment).

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9 minutes ago, The Great Gonzales said:

I mean it's background music....

Background music?

Well, I agree that it depends on the composer or the kind of music, but I would hardly call most of the scores he listed, as mere background music.

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1 minute ago, filmmusic said:

Background music?

Well, I agree that it depends on the composer or the kind of music, but I would hardly call most of the scores he listed, as mere background music.

They play in the background of a film. I was attempting to be slightly humorous anyway.

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2 hours ago, filmmusic said:

How can you read AND listen to scores at the same time?

It seems to me, that you can't pay attention to one of them.

I at least, can't..

 

I can - I like to listen to music while working (even if it means not paying too much attention to the music), and when reading non-fiction. But I don't *want* to listen to music when reading fiction, because it can radically change the mood of whatever I'm reading (and it's unlikely that the music's mood will fit the narrative at any specific point). It's like temp tracking a film with selections that are not tailored to the film.

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2 hours ago, Davis said:

IMG_0465.jpeg

Danny Elfman in badass Terminator mode. 

I actually really like this one. Very nice succinct album as well. 

 

And yes @filmmusic I can read with music on. It helps me "separate" from the outside world. 

 

@Davis I was reading a mix of stuff. Anansi Boys by Neil Gaiman, Jurassic Park by Michael Crichton, Moby Dick by Herman Melleville, and Paul Hirsch film editing memoir. Currently reading The Lost World and The Northern Lights (aka The Golden Compass).

 

Karol

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Just now, Edmilson said:

I never tried but I don't think I could read when music is playing. Especially if it is fiction. If the music doesn't match exactly what is happening on page my brain will hurt trying to differentiate two different mediums telling different stories.

I can understand that. And it doesn't work all the time. I suppose for my non-neurotypical brain, film scores are part of the inner world. They always helped me to recharge and get some rest from the outside world. It's like a trance almost. It's everything outside that distracts me. Does that make sense?

 

Karol

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51 minutes ago, crocodile said:

They always helped me to recharge and get some rest from the outside world. It's like a trance almost.

My thoughts exactly. And not just film music but classical music as well. 
 

Great books, I’ve only read Melville’s Moby Dick which I loved, and started Jurassic Park, but having seen the film countless times has always made

me lose interest after a while. I know the book is somewhat different from the film, and I will read it once I’m determined enough. 
 

I just finished Dogs of War by Adrian Tchaikovsky and now reading 

Darkest Hour: How Churchill Brought England Back from the Brink by Anthony McCarten. 

 

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Bombshell. What is it with 2019 and scores that are so vile that their creators should pay fines for inflicting them upon us?

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IMG_0469.jpeg

What a fantastic score. Not as good as The Mummy, but very close. There will never be another JG.

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I used to listen to music while reading until the third Harry Potter grabbed me so much I had to turn off the music and read the rest of the book in one sitting. But I remember when I first read LOTR at around ~13, The Beatles' Here Comes the Sun was playing when Frodo and Sam climbed Mt. Doom, and that's a connection that will never entirely leave my brain.

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8 hours ago, crocodile said:

I can understand that. And it doesn't work all the time. I suppose for my non-neurotypical brain, film scores are part of the inner world. They always helped me to recharge and get some rest from the outside world. It's like a trance almost. It's everything outside that distracts me. Does that make sense?

 

Karol


That is so freakin cool.  Your brain is awesome!  I can barely read a book in complete silence without having to re-read passages.  Remarkable. 

 

6 hours ago, Davis said:

IMG_0469.jpeg

What a fantastic score. Not as good as The Mummy, but very close. There will never be another JG.


First time listen for me last week. I liked it better than the Mummy actually. 

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11 hours ago, Marian Schedenig said:

I used to listen to music while reading until the third Harry Potter grabbed me so much I had to turn off the music and read the rest of the book in one sitting. But I remember when I first read LOTR at around ~13, The Beatles' Here Comes the Sun was playing when Frodo and Sam climbed Mt. Doom, and that's a connection that will never entirely leave my brain.

 

I have a bunch of those examples from my teenage years. For example, reading Stephen King and listening to things like Santana's GREATEST HITS and Electric Light Orchestra's GREATEST HITS, and when I listen to these albums now, I have this weird cognitive connection -- they're somehow imbued with the unease I felt while reading Stephen King.

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3 minutes ago, Thor said:

For example, reading Stephen King and listening to things like Satan's GREATEST HITS

Fixed.

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A quite original and interesting score by Mikis Theodorakis for a Greek tragedy film!

Heavy on percussion and what it seems like a santur or something.

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:music: Knowing by Marco Beltrami. It’s one of his very best scores, something rooted in his fantasy and horror sound, but applied to a more Close Encounters-like structure. The original album never truly satisfied me and neither does the DE, thanks to its odd structure. So I just created my own 75-minute playlist. It's only 10 minutes longer than the 2009 album but I nixed some stuff from that. 

 

 

Karol

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