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Mr. Manfrenjensenden

What Is The Last Score You Listened To?

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2 hours ago, publicist said:

 

It's a pop score and that was pretty much what they wanted out of it, musically (fearing it would be enough of a hard sell with ancient times and gladiators).

Plus Zimmer had his little lawsuit with the Holst Foundation for borrowing a bit too liberally from Mars Bringer of War. I wonder how did that end eventually. Did he have to pay them a settlement or was the case ruled in Zimmer's favour?

 

Star Wars: The Last Jedi by John Williams

 

The Golden Compass by Alexandre Desplat

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The Mummy (Intrada release) by Jerry Goldsmith: One of my favourite late career Goldsmith scores and such a fun, energetic and colorful action/adventure score. 

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5 hours ago, Incanus said:

this score pretty much started the trend of duduk and Middle Eastern wind instruments and an exotic female vocals featuring in every other film even remotely concerned with the Antiquity or that particular area of the world.

that's a mixed blessing, I'd say (although there are some great examples)

 

4 hours ago, publicist said:

(fearing it would be enough of a hard sell with ancient times and gladiators).

10 minutes ago, Incanus said:

The Mummy 

hmm

 

3 hours ago, Incanus said:

Plus Zimmer had his little lawsuit with the Holst Foundation for borrowing a bit too liberally from Mars Bringer of War.

Ironic

 

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Steven Price's Our Planet.

 

I noticed the series appear on Netflix and went looking for a score release on Spotify. In addition to a 2-Cd release I realised there were 8 individual albums, each a tad under the same length as an episode, which only means one thing - he's released the complete score! I've listened to bits of it and it's fantastic stuff.

 

The problem is that each album in mp3 is £8 which means to buy the entire series' music is £70 (to buy in lossless would cost £112!). It's 6 hours of music, but that's still a chunk of change...

 

(if you bought from HDTracks, the entire set would be an eye-watering £160 :o)

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8 minutes ago, Richard Penna said:

Steven Price's One Planet.

If you enjoyed this I'd highly recommend diving into some a of the other BBC Earth soundtracks, namely Planet Earth and Planet Earth II, Blue Planet and Blue Planet II, and Frozen Planet. PEII and BPII have main themes by Hans Zimmer and plenty of great music from Jacob Shea, Jasha Klebe and David Flemming. The originals of the documentary series' are by George Fenton, and they are also really good. It's amazing and surprising how much great music there is to find in these BBC Earth docs! I have yet to listen to this new Price addition.

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Oh I love Planet Earth and bits of Blue Planet. Zimmer & Co's recent ones not so much.

 

Price's is closer to Fenton's melodic style, and although his action material leans a bit the other way. It's still very good. I'll almost certainly fork out for the complete collection.

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Bernstein is certainly one of my favourite composers from that age. To Kill a Mockingbird is a great score and very well loved.

5 hours ago, Richard Penna said:

Oh I love Planet Earth and bits of Blue Planet. Zimmer & Co's recent ones not so much.

 

Price's is closer to Fenton's melodic style, and although his action material leans a bit the other way. It's still very good. I'll almost certainly fork out for the complete collection.

Yeah, Fenton's original music is really, really good and holds a very nice writing style all to itself. Nice to here that Price's work is near to that. I'm interested in this now.

 

As for Zimmer and Co.'s recent work, I understand that those are a bit different (more non-orchestral sound, RCP), but there are select moments that I really set aside as very good. Favourite excerpts I'd recommend are (from Planet Earth II) The Sloth, The Himalayas, Albatross Dance, Flight Over Alps, Roof of the World, Starlings, and Peaks of Horth America, as well as (from Blue Planet II) The Blue Planet, Surfing Dolphins, Race to Feed (my favourite), and Mobula Rays.

 

It's exciting that BBC has announced Planet Earth III, Blue Planet III, Frozen Planet II, and a slew of other BBC Earth documentary series'. I'd expect that the scores would continue to come from the composers at Bleeding Fingers Music, but I wouldn't mind seeing Price or Fenton get a few of these gigs.

 

EDIT: It looks as though Jacob Shea and Jasha Klebe have contributed to Our Planet. Just saw that. Cool! Will check it out!

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La Dolce Vita - Nino Rota

 

The remastered OST on disc 2 of the Quartet release.  A light, fun way to start a morning.

 

The music instantly relaxes me.

 

 

10 hours ago, The Illustrious Jerry said:

To Kill a Mockingbird is a great score and very well loved.

 

I've loved it for many years.  I'm trying to use less hyperbolic/declamatory language when I talk about music, but.... that is in the absolute most top tier of film scores in history. 

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The Death of Stalin by Christopher Willis

An unexpected pleasure. A Tchaikosvky/Shostakovich-esque string serenade of sorts, fairly-well rooted in the Russian symphonic style of the early 20th century. While being a short album (it's a 30 minute listen, rather brief and lovely) the quality of the score almost makes me want to see some sort of concert symphony come from Willis in a similar key. Best sampler track: A Comedy of Terrors (End Titles).

 

The Old Man and the Gun by Daniel Hart

Easy-going slow swing/jazzy album. Really nice, one of the best listens of 2018 really. Great little tunes. Reminiscent of those classic Guaraldi Trio Charlie Brown scores at times, if you get my meaning. Best sampler track: The Over the Hill Gang.

 

Mary Poppins Returns by Marc Shaiman

Just a run-through of Shaiman's score. It's charming, but it can feel a little too charming at times. I wouldn't say forced, but I get that impression in a sense. Best sampler track: Overture.

 

A is for...

Avengers: Infinity War by Alan Silvestri

Some top-notch action material, good thematic reprises, and new music for Thanos. Best sampler track: Infinity War.

 

Ant-Man by Christophe Beck

A decent theme as far as superheros go, but there's not much more to it than that. Still okay IMO. Best sampler track: Theme from Ant-Man.

 

Attack of the Clones by John Williams

A complete edit of the score arranged in the style of the '97 RCA Victor OT sets. I don't give enough credit to this score, because whenever I pick favourites out of Star Wars this one always ends up on the bottom, which isn't fair because it's still very, very good. I do prefer the other Prequel scores, but Attack of the Clones is a very curious addition, from the whimsical Chase Through Coruscant, to the sweeping love theme and the dark Separatist motif. It's aces, and it's a pity that it sits on a low throne. 

 

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Befitting the season, Alfred Newman's reverential Barber-cum-Handel variation of the 'Greatest Story Ever Told' (you wouldn't guess it from the music). Apart from the adagio dirge that is the famous main theme, there are many sparse solistic moments for woodwinds that are very un-Golden-Age-like, in case you feared. It is probably the most introspective, 'minimalist' score for that genre and era - Newman often was a surprisingly transparent composer, compared to the heavy breathing of Steiner or Tiomkin. Fun fact: a 9-note-phrase of the big journey theme from this score recalls the adventure theme from the LOTR films (listen at the 9 minute mark).

Just now, The Illustrious Jerry said:

The Death of Stalin by Christopher Willis

An unexpected pleasure. A Tchaikosvky/Shostakovich-esque string serenade of sorts, fairly-well rooted in the Russian symphonic style of the early 20th century. While being a short album (it's a 30 minute listen, rather brief and lovely) the quality of the score almost makes me want to see some sort of concert symphony come from Willis in a similar key. Best sampler track: A Comedy of Terrors (End Titles).

 

I hear a lot of Shostakovitch but no Tchaikovski.

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Once Upon a Time in the West by Ennio Morricone

I'm in a Western phase, so every time I watch a movie I listen to the score too. In this case, I started with the score and I'm watching the film now (I'll share thoughts on that too). Harmonica Man is just terrific, and no matter what it is Morricone finds a way to absolutely kill a melody. The main theme is absolutely beautiful, but on a grand scale I feel he was a bit more toned down for this compared to the Dollars Trilogy. Aces.

4 minutes ago, publicist said:

I hear a lot of Shostakovitch but no Tchaikovski.

Only really slight nuances, whereas the Shostakovich is quite up-front. I forgot the name of the cue, but there was one where the theme was played on piano that just felt so freakin' Shostakovich. It was pretty awesome.

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The Shadow - Jerry Goldsmith

 

It's undeniably a Goldsmith score through and through, but you can tell the director wanted it in the vein of Danny Elfman's Batman and Dick Tracy, like in the slower brass and woodwind sections. Great theme too.

 

 

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The day began with Mozart Requiem (Hogwood), then it was:

 

Revenge of the Sith (Demastered Edition)

Black Sunday

 

And I’m currently listening to Yo Yo Ma plays JW music.

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Rocky by Bill Conti

From the memorable main theme; through the nocturnesque Philadelphia Morning, groovy influences of the late 1970s pop & jazz especially eminent in Reflections, a random soul in the track Take it Back, then another ballad song, some naive-sounding fanfares and retro „sensationalist” music that nonetheless posesses quite a charm, it makes for a very pleasant variety show.

I like how vesperal is the overal tone of the album.

 

Company of Heroes 2 by Cris Velasco. The Eastern Front equivalent of Schindler's List.

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2 hours ago, Incanus said:

Ben-Hur (Tadlow re-recording) by Miklós Rózsa

 

Quo Vadis (Tadlow re-recording) by Miklós Rózsa

Perfect for Easter. I will listen to some Rózsa myself!

 

:music: The Gospel of John by Jeff Danna

 

Karol

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Star Trek:

 

The Motion Picture now that I finally have it

 

Now that is a certified GFC. (Great Fucking Score). Past that, on first glance, a real treasure trove of bonus material - though many of the Alternate Takes are not much different at all. The early cues are fascinating (what Mike gracefully puts as aquatic I'd call aimless, but very interesting), the OST is a very good album, portions of the raw tapes are interesting, the beam/synth material is as well, the two pop attempts sound like a terrible idea at first, but turn out to be really fun bits of silliness! My only gripe with the set is a simple matter of convenience - the presentation of the bonus stuff is a bit garbage dump-y, fit it wherever it fits, wouldn't it be so much easier to take out and put in Disc 3 for just listening to the OST and stopping it when it's over? And of course changing discs for exactly 3 tracks in the main presentation is not ideal either, but what can you do when the score is just barely too long?

 

Wrath of Khan now that I finally have it

 

On first listen, it's the same kind of experience as (uhh, should I say it? hmm, can't get much worse for me at this point in this topic) my first listen of Aliens - its highlights touch the sky but it's not without its fair share of filler, repetition (even at this length), and derivativity. I'm coming back more for bits and pieces than the whole so far. Not the biggest fan of the brass Main Title setting of the main "nautical" Kirk/Enterprise motif. Not as negative overall about it as these sentences sound at all, though.

 

Search for Spock because why not give it a fair chance?

 

Well, my initial film impression was incorrect - this takes pretty much all the best elements of Khan and molds them into a more refined and cohesive score that is a much better one to just listen to in whole than its predecessor - however I don't think it ever reaches quite as high as Khan at its best. Still got on my to-get list for sure!

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Two OSTs for my bike ride today

 

Gremlins 2

The Secret of NIMH

 

It was lovely :) 

 

1 hour ago, Faleel J.M. said:

Glad you saw the light on Trek 3 Hello, I definitely share the opinion that 3 is smoother listening experience than 2, especially with there being less atonal material.

 

Plus “Stealing the Enterprise” is Horner’s best Trek cue!

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7 hours ago, Faleel J.M. said:

Glad you saw the light on Trek 3 Holko, I definitely share the opinion that 3 is smoother listening experience than 2, especially with there being less atonal material.

What I find interesting is that the score explores the material that was on the fringes of the previous score. Spock and Spock/Kirk themes take center stage this time whereas Kirk/Enterprise stuff is somewhat less important. And it's the exact opposite with Khan. 3 is a more lush and exotic score which I really enjoy.

 

Karol

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Music from the Edge by John Corigliano: A beautiful album. I am glad Corigliano had an opportunity to release this unused score for The Edge of Darkness as it is a little gem that on album tells a very vivid l aural story of its own and feels very much like a concert work rather than a film score.

 

:music: The Red Violin by John Corigliano

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Metropolis Op. 29 (1927) by Gottfried Huppertz; Berlin Radio SO recording

 

Due to the topic of the film, the score is rich, majestic and beautiful. The thematic nature of Metropolis is recognizable already on the first listen, the action pieces are nothing short of amazing, and the quieter cues, panoramas and overtures are all sorts of marvelous. Every track proved interesting in some way. In tone it is a perfect blend of (even at the time) dated symphonic elements with early XXth century modernism, pleasant as a classical work and nimbly formal as a film score. And then it is somehow smarter about film music cliches that were still yet to come than were many later works.

 

All in all Metropolis possesses a kind of innocent competence that probably shouldn't surprise me at this point, and yet it still does, and the likes of it probably always will.

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Girl with a Pearl Earring by Alexandre Desplat: Still one of my favourite Desplat scores. Elegant and lyrical, a perfect accompaniment to the quiet film that leaves a lot of the emotion and subtext to come through in the score.

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