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What Is The Last Score You Listened To?

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2 hours ago, Stefancos said:

Soundtrack albums are too long! @Thor was right!

 

There, i said it!

Some scores are just not meant to be heard in their entirety. Too many notes.

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7 hours ago, crocodile said:

I like Desplat's dry effort. I like it very much in fact. I was listening to it this morning actually. :)

 

Will give this one a try later on.

 

Karol

 

 

If Desplat had referenced Ifukube’s themes, his score would have been perfect instead of good. 

 

But I was more impressed with Desplat’s effort than I have been with 🐻 effort. 

 

A rather generic sound sound mixed with Ifukube’s themes. 

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For everyone that agrees that there's never enough cheesy monster music, here's 'The Swarm', a prime example. The main motif, a fierce, characteristically jerky idea (if Goldsmith had composed Star Wars, his imperial motif probably would have been along those lines) and the derived-from-it heroic fanfare do great ping-pong and it's capped off with one of his best sport game fanfares...though it's applied here to a solemn Michael Caine speech about...? (i couldn't resist and linked it below).

 

 

 

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Psycho has been composed for a string orchestra instead of a full symphonic ensemble due to budget cuts. Which paradoxically is not that bad, because Herrmann was a master of constrained writing and the results he had gotten were always one-of-a-kind. See also: Journey to the Center of the Earth (the reverse---no strings) or compare to Haydn and the woodwind-less Nelson Mass.

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14 minutes ago, Stefancos said:

And for artistic reasons. Herrmann could have use a different sort of ensemble. He chose strings only because it was a black and white film.

Didn't know that. I thought that this was because Herrmann considered a string ensemble + percussion sufficient for most narrative contexts (he has had 500 radio episodes worth of experience with those at this point) and also because strings are just so versatile.

 

As for mixing, I don't hear anything peculiar (not enough experience?), but Herrmann loved to manipulate sound, so for example the shower scene has the strings doubled in post-production: what we hear at that moment is virtually a 120-piece string orchestra.

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On 5/26/2019 at 12:29 AM, Kasey Kockroach said:

It needed a big choir chanting "Aaaaahhhh" and maybe some "Ooooooo"! Otherwise, how am I supposed to know whether or not this is, in fact, a dramatic moment?

In fact there should have been a big choir in every scored scene to remind us of the drama. And it should have been loud!

 

All kidding aside Psycho is a textbook example of an effective film scoring that delves psychologically deeply into the main characters' minds, their motives and mental states. And it is also memorable music in its own right.

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2 minutes ago, Stefancos said:

TBH, the amped and doubled strings for the opening of The Murder are so ear shatteringly loud it would drown out even the Mormon Tabernacle Choir!

Heh it has been a while since I saw the film but I guess ol' Benny wanted people to REALLY feel the terror! Stab, stab, stab, slash, slash, slash, hack, hack, hack!

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On 5/26/2019 at 7:29 AM, Kasey Kockroach said:

It needed a big choir chanting "Aaaaahhhh" and maybe some "Ooooooo"! Otherwise, how am I supposed to know whether or not this is, in fact, a dramatic moment?

 

It needed modern epic church music!

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How to Train Your Dragon: Hidden World by John Powell

 

The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn by John Williams

 

Psycho (Varese re-recording) by Bernard Herrmann

 

Young Sherlock Holmes by Bruce Broughton

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Thanks, Intrada.

 

Amusing mix of Broughton, Broadway, Neal Hefti and generally what was 90's kiddie movie music (less emphasis on West Side Story this time). Desplat has this style mesh pat down, though it's of course all a bit slight (a far cry from Horner's through-composed cues). But it get's a B for sheer effort.

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Creed II by Ludwig Göransson

I've been absolutely hooked on this for the last few weeks, and I've assembled a great 40 minute or so playlist that is great for underscoring a great many things, as I've found out. From working out to mowing the lawn, it screams power and energy! Some absolutely delicious writing from Goransson, whose upcoming projects I've shared my enthusiasm about based on the potential I see in scores such as this. 

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He wrote one of the finest themes of this decade. It has many components and it develops! Terrific stuff.

 

:music: God of War. I'm not a biggest fan of Bear. He's talented and versatile but his sensibilities are rarely in tune with mine. Having said that, this is kind of neat. Now this is what Game of Thrones should have sounded like.

 

I just received an email my Godzilla: King of the Monsters has arrived. Will check it out once I'm back home. 

 

Karol

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Hostage by Alexandre Desplat

 

The Amazing Spider-man by James Horner

 

The Monuments Men by Alexandre Desplat

 

Drag Me to Hell by Christopher Young

 

Bless the Child by Christopher Young

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Godzilla: King of Monsters by Bear McCreary

 

Is it finally over? Thank God. Not that it's necessarily bad, but I clearly don't have the patience or tolerance for this kind of "wall-of-sound" blockbuster scoring anymore...and this was only with pub's abridged playlist, mind you. Some fun colours and clever Ifukube callbacks aside, it's just more of the same inane ostinato driven, big-drum pounding noise isn't it? At the end of the day, too much of it just comes across as anonymous support material/sound design for VFX. I'm glad some people are enjoying it though. There is more craftsmanship and production value here than your average RC score, sure. But is it really any better as music? McCreary just seems to lack a very interesting musical vision or voice, something I find myself feeling with a lot of his work. In that sense, it pales in comparison Desplat's leaner and bluntly ferocious work.

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