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What Is The Last Score You Listened To?

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2 minutes ago, bollemanneke said:

But I just stopped bothering with unofficial albums...

 

Four Your Consideration Albums are literally official albums in every sense of the word

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47 minutes ago, bollemanneke said:

But I just stopped bothering with unofficial albums...

 

I’ll make it official!

 

Indeed, the FYC albums are always listed on my discography.

 

🤩

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1 hour ago, bollemanneke said:

Okay, the final tracks are great, but the finale could have been much, much more and the album opens with downright dull material.

 

I think track #2 is my favourite for now...

 

I'm not bothering with the FYC and reedits; the eventual complete release will be that much more exciting without me being familiar with the FYC material. But I'm pretty sure the score will only really come together in (at least mostly) complete form. The OST album as it is is rather patchworky.

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The Emperor's Club

 

Small, intimate, Americana-inspired score by JNH. The proeminence of guitars on this score reminded me of some Thomas Newman Americana scores, like The Horse Whisperer, as well as some parts of JNH's own The Postman. Even still, there's some beautiful tracks, specially from Hundert Quits onwards, that have some touching writing from strings, oboes and French horns.

 

A lovely score that I really like rediscovering once in a while. As much as I like his blockbuster scores, he should do movies like this one, Water for Elephants and A Hidden Life more often.

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WWII

 

John Williams - None but the brave (1965)
John Williams - Goodbye, Mr, Chips (1969) (the score)
John Williams - Midway (1976)
John Williams - 1941 (1979) (the score)

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I'm slowly working my way through all of the CDs I own but haven't listened to yet, with a current focus on Oscar winning scores.  Last night was The Hateful 8 and E.T.

 

The Hateful 8 was enjoyable, but I could have done without all of the dialogue tracks.  Those are going to get phased out of my regularly listening very quickly.

 

E.T. is a score that I don't know as well (although I suppose that's something that just improves over time as I listen more), but it'll always hold a special place in my heart because I went to see the Boston Pops play the score with the movie on a screen in the background.  I only had enough time to listen to the first disc of the La La Land 35th anniversary release, so I'll need to listen to disc 2 at a later date.

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Stargate (LLL release) by David Arnold: I really like this expansion. Sure the added unreleased music doesn't fill too many minutes but the film versions and alternates with more choral chanting and whispering are a welcome addition to my personal playlist of this score. Considering that this was only Arnold's second big film scores makes it all the more impressive.

 

The Disaster Movie Soundtrack Collection box:

The Poseidon Adventure by John Williams: A grim, claustrophobic and mostly moody and suspenseful outing from Williams. Very much establishes the recipe for the two following scores dealing with these disasters and humans caught up in them. An attention calling dramatic main title piece, a whole slew of pop music inflected writing for source music and character moments in the establishing half of the film and then a lot of dark, mournful and moody underscore for the survival half of the movie ending with another bookending rendition of the main theme for the finale and end credits. Despite its grim and dark nature I actually appreciate this score a lot. It strikes a good balance between the dark atmosphere and a subtle thematic throughline which keeps it afloat its brief running time.

 

The Towering Inferno by John Williams: My favourite of the three. Has great orchestral writing mixed with the 1970's pop music source music and love theme material. The score is obviously afforded more opportunities to support the action (a lot of it was dialed out of the film though) and it is the longest and I feel the most ambitious of the three in terms of scope and thematic development. The main title is such a terrific busy piece of music that is afforded magnificent 5 minutes to develop and Williams really makes most of it and the Planting the Charges is first rate musical build-up before the relief and release of the optimistic finale.

 

Earthquake by John Williams: This is a score that either on album or in actual film score form feels most disjointed of the three. Williams' excellent busy and fateful sounding main title music is followed by what is a series of individual character themes that are all mostly self-contained in their tracks and are very much 1970's in their style which isn't exactly my cup of tea for the most part. Then this pre-earthquake material is followed by the other half of the score which is sparsely scored, terse, gloomy and suspenseful music for the subsequent survival part of the film ending in the almost elegiac aftermath music. It is great to hear the original film score for the first time but on the whole to my mind this is the least of the three disaster movie score JW did.

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Agreed, on all aspects, Inky, but...as it was only the second JW OST that I purchased, I have a continuing soft spot, for EARTHQUAKE, on which subject...it must have been very hard for JW to score these two films. Because of recent events, both scores almost seem cathartic. There's an almost stoic determination to be heard to heard in both, and, at the end, a sense of relief that it's all over, and that people can get back to some sort of normality. In that respect, they could be the two most autobiographical scores he's ever written. Although I like both scores, very much (THE TOWERING INFERNO currently resides at #3 on my all-time top-ten JW list), I hear an immense amount of sadness, in them.

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Little women (Alexandre Desplat) ****

 

At first listen didn't liked it so much, but I revisited it after watching the movie and grew on me. A lot of the moments of the film had their own theme (Telegram, Father's come home, The beach), and I like a lot the resemblance of The Ghost Writer in the cue Jo Writes. 

The cue Dance on the porch in the movie was replaced by Dvorak's String Quartet n 12 (The american), probably because the scene just doesn't work, and they blamed the music, but it's a very interesting cue, almost like an orquestral arrangement of a pop song. 

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The Personal History of David Copperfield by Christopher Willis

 

So turns out this Willis fella is no one-hit wonder. There's a lot of sophisticated writing here. This time he's moved from Shostakovich mostly to John Adams for his modus operandi (lots of Shaker Loops all over the score). The whole thing has a bit of an identity crisis, stylistically, but nice to hear some uncompromised writing for film again.

 

EDIT: Haha only seeing your post now @publicist! Total coincidence! :lol:

 

 

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Jurassic Park III — Don Davis (complete)

I remember despising this soundtrack when I was a kid, probably because it was not by JW.
I recently realized it's not half bad. It's pretty good, actually.

Returned to this after re-listening to Davis' Matrix complete scores, 'cause I love how he orchestrates brass,

and his work in this score is a nice and respectful addition to the JW/JP soundtracks.

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Travelling back from Vienna after an exciting and emotional weekend. ☺️

 

Close Encounters of the Third Kind (LLL CD 1 "album version")

War Horse

Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back (OST)

 

:music:Superman: The Movie (OST)

 

Karol

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TRON: Legacy

 

This is a cool score. Just the right mix of electronica and traditional orchestral elements. Obviously exactly what the movie needed and it really adds a great deal to it. Detached from the images, it mostly works. It's not a perfect album, but it's damn solid, even without trimming. I didn't know who Daft Punk was before they were hired for this one and I'm not sure I've heard anything else by them, but this is still one of the most refreshing, interesting and flat out cool scores of (fairly) recent years.

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11 hours ago, publicist said:

The releases were a nightmare. I had to buy extra stuff from Amazon, iTunes and Nokia, if I remember it right. All differently tagged. 

 

The extra tracks weren't that important though, if I remember correctly.

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I actually knew Daft Punk prior to any score listening I did, and I do credit them for leading me down this rabbit hole. That being said: I never did bother with the OST as a result of my purist nature with them. Why go with the incomplete thing when I can listen to the raw set? As such, I have a hard time being convinced to throw out any tracks, even if there is trimming one can do.

 

17 hours ago, publicist said:

The releases were a nightmare. I had to buy extra stuff from Amazon, iTunes and Nokia, if I remember it right. All differently tagged. 

 

They actually eventually released an EP that collects most of the extra tracks. However, the iTunes stuff isn't included, so you'd have to still buy those in their AAC form (or FLAC if you have Tidal in a small foreign country). Doesn't excuse the initial shoddy management, though.

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The Book Thief by John Williams

Unquestionably a masterpiece- one of the great dark horses in Williams' repertoire! The suite of the same name is one of his best of this decade. 

 

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Alexandre Desplat

Four times now, with multiple individual repeats also going to Mr. Moustafa, The Family Desgoffe und Taxis, J.G. Jopling - Private Inquiry Agent, The Cold Blooded Murder of Deputy Vilmos Kovacs, No Safe-House, Canto at Gabelmeister's Peak (at least ten times), and A Troops Barracks. The OST is pleasantly coherent beyond measure.

 

Phantom Thread by Jonny Greenwood (OST and FYC on separate occasions)

Delicate and lovely! The End Credits, House of Woodcock and Phantom Thread IV (going by FYC cues and titles which are fresh in my memory) are all keepers for future muse playlists. 

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