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What Is The Last Score You Listened To?

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25 minutes ago, Holko said:

And what's worse, what is on there is so bafflingly randomly ordered and edited.

Agreed.

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7 hours ago, Naïve Old Fart said:

Not bad, Croc. Now, try:

KRULL

BRAINSTORM

GORKY PARK

COCOON

STAR TREK III

All great scores. I might have listened to one or two of them today.

 

:music: Enemy at the Gates. Strange thing but I'm sort of starting to like this one. I used to hate it save for a few notable moments. Perhaps it is just me going soft or maybe the fact film music tends to be mostly lame these days (in comparison). Yes, it is derivative as hell in places but there you just don't get that kind of a sprawling melodrama in film music anymore. If anything, it makes for a very pleasant evening listen.

 

Karol

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I wouldn't call it pleasant - it's rather heavy and cloudy - but at least it does stuff musically, and doesn't lumber around within two chords doing nothing. It's Horner's love letter to Russian music and he's moving effortlessly in this idiom. Album's 20 minutes too long, of course.

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All I know is that I love the string theme that opens The River Crossing to Stalingrad and the movie itself. So sad, yet mysterious and evocative... Sure, he opened Braveheart similarly, but I prefer its rendition here over the Mel Gibson movie.

 

Also, the end titles track is one of my personal favorites by Horner.

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2 hours ago, publicist said:

I wouldn't call it pleasant - it's rather heavy and cloudy - but at least it does stuff musically, and doesn't lumber around within two chords doing nothing. It's Horner's love letter to Russian music and he's moving effortlessly in this idiom. Album's 20 minutes too long, of course.

When I say pleasant I mostly mean it flows from one piece to another. Horner knew a thing or two about creating coherent story through music. And his albums, while often overlong, "make sense".

 

:music:Black Gold. This is much more reasonably assembled album.

 

Karol

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Another FSM expansion found its way to Spotify. Having not listened to this particular score for a long time makes it doubly remarkable how much development Goldsmith put into a regular *underscore* cue like 'On The Circuit': elaborating on and deconstructing his main theme with modernist writing techniques (Bartok and Stravinsky, naturally)  during a 4-minute cue is just the tip of the iceberg, the rising three-note motif is put through so many guises in the score proper it almost becomes nauseating and puts modern scoring approaches to shame (musically). The purely electronic cues remain a challenge for the ear but even barring those you still sit on a healthy 50-minute album, one of the best sci-fi scores ever. It's modernist, yes, but still immensely digestible with one brilliant balletic action cue (You're Renewed) that rocks the house. 

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:music: Titanic. There are bits in this score that are amazing but it is so frustrating in its entirety. Still, it is very memorable... I'm just not sure whether it is for the right reasons all the time. Having said that, I'm glad the LLL came out. At least I get to create my own playlist

 

Karol

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Most of the money went to the cutting edge CGI, so the music budget was tiny. Because of that, they had to do substantial parts of the score electronic.

 

No wonder Back to Titanic was recorded with the LSO. If believe that, if it was up to Horner, he'd have recorded Titanic with the LSO normally.

 

But then again, neither of his Cameron collabs went easily:

 

-Aliens: Horner and Cameron almost fought on the recording stage.

-Titanic: Small music budget, orchestra only during the sinking action scenes, Cameron didn't want a song and demanded lots and lots and lots of rewrites.

-Avatar: That one apparently came out without fights, but Horner recorded hours and hours of music, and had to do lots of research on musical traditions of indigenous people to create Pandora's musical tradition.

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1 hour ago, Edmilson said:

-Avatar: That one apparently came out without fights, but Horner recorded hours and hours of music, and had to do lots of research on musical traditions of indigenous people to create Pandora's musical tradition.

He then in a rather typical fashion just repurposed a lot of his music from Apocalypto for the people and jungles of Pandora, almost wholesale. The choral vocals were something more unique though.

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1 hour ago, Edmilson said:

Most of the money went to the cutting edge CGI, so the music budget was tiny. Because of that, they had to do substantial parts of the score electronic.

 

Is that really the reason? I always assumed it was a stylistic choice, albeit not a very good one.

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14 minutes ago, Incanus said:

He then in a rather typical fashion just repurposed a lot of his music from Apocalypto for the people and jungles of Pandora, almost wholesale. The choral vocals were something more unique though.

 

Well, most of the musical research was already done for Apocalypto, no need to do it twice... lol

 

4 minutes ago, KK said:

Is that really the reason? I always assumed it was a stylistic choice, albeit not a very good one.

 

Not only that, on certain cues they thought the synths worked better. One JWFanner once asked Simon Franglen about Titanic, and posted the answer on this thread:

 

 

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On 2/28/2020 at 10:18 AM, publicist said:

 

Another FSM expansion found its way to Spotify. Having not listened to this particular score for a long time makes it doubly remarkable how much development Goldsmith put into a regular *underscore* cue like 'On The Circuit': elaborating on and deconstructing his main theme with modernist writing techniques (Bartok and Stravinsky, naturally)  during a 4-minute cue is just the tip of the iceberg, the rising three-note motif is put through so many guises in the score proper it almost becomes nauseating and puts modern scoring approaches to shame (musically). The purely electronic cues remain a challenge for the ear but even barring those you still sit on a healthy 50-minute album, one of the best sci-fi scores ever. It's modernist, yes, but still immensely digestible with one brilliant balletic action cue (You're Renewed) that rocks the house. 

I find that three-note-motif and its many variations much more impressive than. let's say Jaws three-note-motif. I've heard Mr. Goldsmith had a little less than a year to compose the score?

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The Nightmare Before Christmas – Danny Elfman (25th Anniversary Complete Edition)

Can't help it. I absolutely adore this one: it brings back tons of great memories from my childhood, plus DIES IRÆ OVERLOAD

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Kingdom of the Crystal Skull OST

 

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Gave it a go after the world's mildest push by Nick...

 

and I loved it. Best Indy album by far in terms of assembly (though the other 3... things are not hard to overtake). I don't think I've ever listened to it outside of repeating a couple tracks 10 years ago, and I never bothered with the sessions. Well, it's no Temple of Doom, but sign me up as pumped as hell for an MM assembly with better mixing!

Personal highlights I can think of quickly are Adventures of Mutt (though I may prefer the S/W III version), Irina's material, I love Call of the Crystal, Ants, the inexplicable cimbalom, Jungle Chase! Not sure what the celeste from Hogwarts Forever (vocal version) was doing here and there but it wasn't unwelcome.

 

I saved it on Spotify, it'll be the only Indy thing I listen to until we get an MM box (since the other OSTs suck balls and I'm doing my stupid protest thing like with Star Wars), except maybe Indy 5 if it's JW and we get it first.

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Well, yeah, that's part of the stupid protest thing like Star Wars. I could be listening to the ESB SE too instead of the randomised mess but I'm waiting for it to be done as properly as possible, and when it's done it'll be all the more sweet, finally hearing it again after a long time, without having filled that time with not quite perfect or adequate middle form substitutes.

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I've been busy on a RCP roll over the last few days. Mostly HZ and JP.

 

Winter's Tale - Hans Zimmer and Rupert Gregson-Williams

 

That's a pretty bad entry on both composers' curriculum. It's a warm, romantic score that lacks the sophisticated touch of someone like, say, James Horner, Thomas Newman or James Newton Howard. In RGW's hands (Zimmer apparently only did the main piano theme, according to info on HZ.com), it becomes one hour of wandering, meaningless, directionless and almost pedestrian melodrama, with a piano lullaby theme that reminded me of drama music in South Park of all things and some action/suspense material that seems like early demos rejected from Inception.

 

Pretty bland. Seems like the kind of work written by someone very early on his career, trying to emulate his influences, but sounding like a childish copy of them. Thankfully, some years later than this score, RGW's dramatic music got a little better, with the early parts of Hacksaw Ridge, the Diana and Steve love theme from Wonder Woman and Queen Atlanna's theme from Aquaman.

 

Kung Fu Panda - Hans Zimmer and John Powell (recording sessions)

 

Despite Oogway's theme being great (Hans is always good when writing asiatic music), I never connected that much with the score. It's not as dramatic and touching as Zimmer's best animated scores (Lion King, Prince of Egypt, Spirit), not as fun and energetic as Powell's. Just okay in my opinion. Maybe a situation of "too many cooks"? I guess these KFP scores would've been better as Powell's solo efforts.

 

Hancock - John Powell

 

Fun score. I love how Powell tried to get more groovy with this one. And the finale is one of his all time best musical moments.

 

Mars Needs Moms - John Powell

 

Pretty funny as well, and it has some great themes. Powell fans around here should get to know this score, it's really well done.

 

Agent Cody Banks - John Powell

 

It has some good action moments, but overall, very childish and repetitive. It's like a dumbed down version of the much better Paycheck, that came out on that same year.

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Alien

Masterpiece.

 

Aliens

's alright. I really should cut down on the boring middle cues which are not up to the level of Goldsmith's underscory ones at all.

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On 2/29/2020 at 8:51 PM, Holko said:

Not sure what the celeste from Hogwarts Forever (vocal version) was doing here and there but it wasn't unwelcome.


Where exactly was it?

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Znalezione obrazy dla zapytania: korngold the two worldsZnalezione obrazy dla zapytania: flame and arrow steiner

 

and a couple others

 

Of note is especially Steiner's score for the film Ice Palace. I think it might well be one of his greatest.

 

The most interesting little gem, however, I found on the Youtube channel of the author of Korngold's first professional biography -  Brendan Carroll:

 

An otherwise unreleased [high quality] recording of five minutes of Korngold conducting his favourite film score, straight from a studio acetate disc.

 

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Snow Falling on Cedars by James Newton Howard: Despite this being mostly a supreme showcase of atmosphere building apart from a few moments of grand orchestral and choral histrionics, I have to say I would rank this among JNH's best. There is just something so captivating about the combination of subtle Japanese instrumental touches and the ethereal orchestral scoring that builds a very coherent musical whole, its own musical world that is so very effective and even affecting.

 

The Da Vinci Code by Hans Zimmer: One of the rare Zimmer scores I can stomach from start to finish. While nothing absolutely new it is a very engaging and at times simply beautiful album with wonderful choral and soloist work and melodies.

 

The Village by James Newton Howard: Another perennial JNH favourite of mine.  Beauty, love, horror, mystery all wrapped in one, this is a score that also builds its own musical world with strong central ideas and moods. While the OST is sufficient, the complete score offers even more of the same goodness and extends the experience, strengthening some of the recurring musical ideas further and offering new variations on the established ones. 

 

Final Fantasy the Spirits Within by Elliot Goldenthal: I certainly wouldn't mind a complete score release of this sci-fi/fantasy outing from Goldenthal as it is just massive roaring piece of gothically grand (or should I say Straussian) orchestral and choral writing mixed with his usual aggressive avant garde ideas and tenderly lyrical love music. The 50 minute album flies by and while there is a definite musical arc to it, it left me wanting even more of this great music. Actually I would just like Goldenthal to write something this big for films again but it is a long shot at this point.

 

 

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Taking a break from my Horner marathon.

 

:music: Final Symphony: Music From Final Fantasy VI, VII and X. A most wonderful adaptation of classic gane music performed with gusto by the LSO. It's a shame they never released the follow up album.

 

Karol

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6 hours ago, Incanus said:

Snow Falling on Cedars by James Newton Howard: Despite this being mostly a supreme showcase of atmosphere building apart from a few moments of grand orchestral and choral histrionics, I have to say I would rank this among JNH's best. There is just something so captivating about the combination of subtle Japanese instrumental touches and the ethereal orchestral scoring that builds a very coherent musical whole, its own musical world that is so very effective and even affecting.

 

The Da Vinci Code by Hans Zimmer: One of the rare Zimmer scores I can stomach from start to finish. While nothing absolutely new it is a very engaging and at times simply beautiful album with wonderful choral and soloist work and melodies.

 

The Village by James Newton Howard: Another perennial JNH favourite of mine.  Beauty, love, horror, mystery all wrapped in one, this is a score that also builds its own musical world with strong central ideas and moods. While the OST is sufficient, the complete score offers even more of the same goodness and extends the experience, strengthening some of the recurring musical ideas further and offering new variations on the established ones. 

 

Final Fantasy the Spirits Within by Elliot Goldenthal: I certainly wouldn't mind a complete score release of this sci-fi/fantasy outing from Goldenthal as it is just massive roaring piece of gothically grand (or should I say Straussian) orchestral and choral writing mixed with his usual aggressive avant garde ideas and tenderly lyrical love music. The 50 minute album flies by and while there is a definite musical arc to it, it left me wanting even more of this great music. Actually I would just like Goldenthal to write something this big for films again but it is a long shot at this point.

 

 

 

 

All 4 are terrific scores, among the respective composers best works

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7 hours ago, Incanus said:

The Village by James Newton Howard: Another perennial JNH favourite of mine.  Beauty, love, horror, mystery all wrapped in one, this is a score that also builds its own musical world with strong central ideas and moods. While the OST is sufficient, the complete score offers even more of the same goodness and extends the experience, strengthening some of the recurring musical ideas further and offering new variations on the established ones. 

 

 

I love The Village as well. However, most of my favorite tracks, aside from The Vote, are unreleased and only available on the bootleg. Someone should really expand this score to a proper, chronological presentation.

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32 minutes ago, Edmilson said:

 

I love The Village as well. However, most of my favorite tracks, aside from The Vote, are unreleased and only available on the bootleg. Someone should really expand this score to a proper, chronological presentation.

They should do that to all Shyamalan/JNH collaborations!

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Indeed, although I think there isn't that much missing from the OSTs of Sixth Sense, Unbreakable and Signs (I know post-Lady in the Water scores are unavailable by now). All the highlights are there. 

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Sinister (2012) - Christopher Young

This was a rather conflicting one. It has more going for it than Pet Semetery, in that it manages to do quite a bit with its synth driven sound. There's 3-4 solid tracks that feel like they manage to capture what I personally find appealing about Reznor/Ross scores. However, too much of it is reliant on being SFX showcases with your standard horror music cliches in-between, which earlier Chris Young scores managed to avoid. There's not much of a narrative here that you can easily follow, and thus more feels like a collection of musical ideas than a full fledged piece. That's the one thing I will give PS over it, in that it does have some recognizable motifs (even if it takes a bit to find them). However, it lacks anything as compelling as Sinister's own "Never Go In Dad’s Office" and "Millimeter Music." Ultimately, I wouldn't say it's particularly great or even good overall, but there's compelling moments that make it ultimately worthwhile. If anything, it has the novelty of CY doing dubstep, something I never thought was possible.

Also, here's other random crap I heard that I got too lazy to write full fledged things for:

Gladiator (2000) Hans Zimmer - I see why this mode of Zimmer is missed by people and it does admittedly have some excellent pieces. However, I just couldn't find myself getting too into it, likely because of how long the complete is. Might need to try the OST down the road. Also, I expected Gerrard to have more of a presence for being the supposed co-composer and how talked up her role in the score is. Honestly makes more of an impact in M:I-2.

Bad Boys (1995) Mark Mancina - A perfectly serviceable listen with a fun main theme and one excellent action cue ("Escape From Club Hell / Ether Chase"). The style is all it really has going for it, and while it does lead to fun moments, there's little I'd call really substantive.

Bad Boys II (2003) Trevor Rabin - Complete mess of a score that still manages to have 20 minutes of guilty pleasure material. It feels like it should be the absolute worse of what makes a MV/RCP score, but I didn't loathe it like I did BB3. I guess because I'm less familiar with Rabin, whose voice from NT definitely doesn't appear at all. If nothing else, it's probably fine enough study music.

Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen (2009) Steve Jablonsky - Still my favorite of the series, plus the best assembled OST. Just the right balance of being self-aware of its cheese while still being able to be earnest in its more serious moments. Very fleshed out in its motifs before the remaining sequels were made even more simplistic in their approach.

Point Break (2015) Junkie XL - A similar dealio with BBII, though definitely more focused in its approach. The best moments were the quieter parts, which were few and far between. I can see why the record label didn't release an OST and stuck with just the end credits suite on the VA album, since it sums up the score very well. Just listen to that if you're curious.

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:music: Patriot Games. A very underrated work. It is one of the few Horner scores where I actually like how he does the Celtic sound. And I also like how he combines synthetic elements with live instruments. The score has a stark ghostly sound which I think works quite well.

 

Karol

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The Lion in Winter by Richard Hartley

 

The Lion in Winter by John Barry

 

The Hobbit: The Desolation of Smaug by Howard Shore

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5 minutes ago, Naïve Old Fart said:

Hartley? Is that the score to the Close/Stewart adaptation?

Yup. I have a fondness for the movie thanks to that dynamic duo and the score is not half bad either. You can really hear the difference of 35 years of developing trends in the film music industry compared to Barry's thunderous approach for the 1968 film. While Barry's is an attention grabber, Hartley's music slowly but surely works its way to your heart (knowing the film adds to the impact of the score). Interestingly some of their scoring approaches are identical with Barry undoubtedly influencing Hartley's in the grander orchestral and choral moments. Hartley's score is also more concerned with the source music than Barry's (it had its Christmas carols though) and is very much music supporting the dialogue and mood and not making itself too intrusive.

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