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Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows Part 1 by Alexandre Desplat


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Considering how the nature of this film is shaping up from reports - that the characters are on the run, unsure of each other and without the familiarity of Hogwarts and their friends - this seems an appropriate choice.

Yes, the characters are "on the run", so he decided to ... write no theme whatsoever.

Right.

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The closed minded-ness here is disgusting me. Having listened to it all, I like it very much. Desplat brought a new sound to the series and a new style of composition, and it works. A lot of you are just way to set in what you like, and many of you were prepared to hate this score before you heard a note of it. Open your minds a bit. Heck, I hated most of the Ron Jones box samples that I heard, yet I just bought it and plan to give it a fair shot. Ben-Hur bored me to death at first, to be honest, but after hearing El Cid and revisting Ben-Hur it suddenly clicked. Just give it a fair shot! One or two listens, out of context of the film no less, are sometimes not enough.

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There have been a lot of discussions of late where i have been shocked by how close-minded some people are on here... That 'Which JW scores should have been rejected' discussion being one of the most bizarre.

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After reading all these negative posts and listening to the samples on the official site I'm really looking forward to hearing this even more because that means it's probably better than I even expected.

It is Mark, trust me.

There have been a lot of discussions of late where i have been shocked by how close-minded some people are on here... That 'Which JW scores should have been rejected' discussion being one of the most bizarre.

I wouldn't be too concerned. Those who don't like it can not like it. No big deal. I'm sure Desplat is not losing any sleep over it. Those of us who do like what we hear can talk more about it in a separate thread once the score is officially released. I will say that some of the observations on this thread are laughable to me, but that's my POV. As I said before, I didn't expect this to win over a bunch of new Desplat lovers. It's his style through and through and I love it personally.

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Its not that the scores not good. and its not that the score won't work for the film.

I think the question was.. appropriateness...

You don't make a STAR WARS film and not open with the fox fanfare and [01:30] of 'Main Title'... Williams started the series with a credits selection and when he scored the credits for Episode III (the finale of the series) he retold that same selection.

Then again, William's knows how to tip his hat be it small moments of "monster movie" horns in war of the worlds, orchestrations ala Raymond scott in the source music to TOD, the VERY Aaron Copland americana in Superman and even the VERY Jazzy New York sound ala Leonard Bernstein in Home Alone II...

I do feel part of the magic that made the films...what they are... was williams. Who do they call when the park opens? Williams... who did they ask to make trailer music? Who did they keep around even though he could barely score the second film? That's because he did the films justice... and i think that the following composers, for whatever reasons, felt to travel so far away from the real Harry Potter... that its barely recognizeable anymore...and that i feel is the bigger tragedy...

I like the music. It shows talent... but its not what i feel HP7 needed... not completely... which is why i write my own score :-p

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I'd understand that mentality if Williams had firmly established that kind of continuity himself. But look at PoA. He broke all of that himself. There was no "Harry's Wondrous World" in the end credits, despite the previous two movies ending in that way. Comparing the Potter series with Star Wars for continuity just won't work; the films have been as different as each other ever since the third one. I just don't know why people are still complaining about it now when it's been a fact for 6 years now.

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Probably because we all had hope the series would find its way home again...

I'm all for development... but towards what? I don't see this as development.. it was being different for the sake of being different.

Now not to say its bad, although i hated GOF's score for the most part... but i just feel it wasn't.. controlled enough. It needed guidelines... it needed supervision. Instead it was "what can we place against this" and i think that's the bigger travesty. if fans could look at it and see the progression.. they'd be happier.. even if the scores weren't quite the same stylistically... they'd have a sense of...progression.

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It's not different for the sake of being different. It's each composer's own interpretation of the project they were working on. The different directors were given free reign to imagine the Potter universe they way they saw fit, and so too were the composers. What's the point in getting big-name composers like Doyle or Desplat if they're not allowed to interpret in their own way? Surely they were chosen for a reason.

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Exactly. The thing for me - and i know for a lot of other film goers out there - that has kept the series so alive and fresh is the way the producers have worked hard to hire directors who will bring a fresh take on the material so as not to bore audiences. I know the films have a lot of critics on these boards, but i think the series has maintained an extremely high level of quality, and even though every film does have its flaws the fact that not one of the films has fallen below 78% on the RottenTomato meter is a huge testament for a series of this length to maintain standards so high and keep re-inventing itself. Even though the last 3 (soon to be 4) films have had the same director, Yates has made sure that each feel feels very tonally different from the last: Something Columbus could not do between the first two films. If the series has constantly shifted tone visually and stylistically, why not musically? The score for DH seems to reflect a very mature film that is more about inner turmoil then anything outwardly presentational and if it suits the film it is made more then Desplat has done his job well.

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Its not that the scores not good. and its not that the score won't work for the film.

I think the question was.. appropriateness...

You don't make a STAR WARS film and not open with the fox fanfare and [01:30] of 'Main Title'... Williams started the series with a credits selection and when he scored the credits for Episode III (the finale of the series) he retold that same selection.

Then again, William's knows how to tip his hat be it small moments of "monster movie" horns in war of the worlds, orchestrations ala Raymond scott in the source music to TOD, the VERY Aaron Copland americana in Superman and even the VERY Jazzy New York sound ala Leonard Bernstein in Home Alone II...

I do feel part of the magic that made the films...what they are... was williams. Who do they call when the park opens? Williams... who did they ask to make trailer music? Who did they keep around even though he could barely score the second film? That's because he did the films justice... and i think that the following composers, for whatever reasons, felt to travel so far away from the real Harry Potter... that its barely recognizeable anymore...and that i feel is the bigger tragedy...

I like the music. It shows talent... but its not what i feel HP7 needed... not completely... which is why i write my own score :-p

If your score is like your logic, don't quit your day job. You failed at "not appropriate for the film" which no doubt less than 200 people have seen.

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I know...but I don't know. And if I knew, I wouldn't tell you. But I did tell you, a while ago, but it vanished, so now you can't know...unless it's buried in your memory. And if it is, then I have to kill you.

;)

Then there is the (usual) huge dissapointment in continuity. I'm not talking just about Williams themes. Why not use Doyle's Harry in Winter or even Hoopers "Flight of the Order of the Phoenix". As a composer you can't just completely ignore all the themes of a SIX movie franchise ( 50sec of the main theme is close to nothing).

For me that's an arrogant and creatively extremely poor decision, whichevers fault it was.

To be honest, i didnt know Alexandre Desplat before this score. So i can't compare his previous efforts but considered the chance this Potter movie provided for him, it is extremely dissapointing that he didnt deliver something more worthy in the end.

Alexandre Desplat definetly isnt the hope for near future score masterpieces. Maybe he will be 20 years from now but this Potter proves the opposite for the near future.

Potter isn't Bond. There is no definitive structure, especially with the ever changing cast and crew. Why would a composer in the most basic sense even want to reuse past themes? Like you said, it's a nice opportunity to do something different and exciting, so why would you not tackle it by yourself? The franchise's main theme is there, and I honestly wouldn't care if it wasn't. Maybe you (and others) should realize that this isn't The Deathly Hallows. It's The Deathly Hallows Part I. Maybe those underwhelming themes you called motifs, are not fully developed cause, y'know, there's still 2 and a half hours left to develop them. You say Desplat isn't the hope for future score masterpieces, yet no one is really saying that. You even said yourself you haven't heard anything else by him. Broaden your horizons, listen to some samples. He composed NINE scores last year. Probably the only composer besides Morricone to ever do that. Desplat has already composed two masterpieces as far as I'm concerned.

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For me, it's Home Alone = Home Alone 2.

They are equally great, but in different ways. Many people have a very low opinion of HA2, but I am not one of them.

Home Alone had a budget of around 18 mill, and Home Alone 2 probably five times that. So that's why they are very different movies... although the basic story idea is pretty much the same.

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I love Desplat. This score is almost exactly what I was hoping for. I am sure in the context of the film, it will seem even better. On a side Desplat note, I've been listening to "The Truth About Ruth" from The Ghost Writer non-stop today. Such an amazing cue.

Tim Curry is brilliant in Lost In New York

"A Limousine and piz-ZA. Compliments of the Plaza Hotel"

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To call the negative opinions about this score laughable is very strange as everybody is certainly entitled to their opinion and look at this score from their own perspective with respective hopes and expectations and tastes.

It is really not a question of being too closed minded or stupid or slow or dull witted or unanalytical if you do not like some piece of music or even an entire album. It just does not appeal to some people.

To accuse people of being too attached to Williams' "fluffy and sugary Disney style music" is equally strange. Williams scored his HP movies very appropriately and did what was required of him and if people found that style moving or appealing then that is it. If they expect the same from a mature and darker movie then they will and that is their stance for better or for worse for them and their expectations. If some do not like Williams' approach then that is just fine by me, not everybody can stomach his fantasy writing. But the hostility in some comments, judging people in so acerbic way for liking Williams' HP music, is really strange.

Some people wished for more easily identifiable thematic material and they get highbrowed replies that sound like the defenders are on some higher sophisticated plane of existence where they can hear these musical ideas as some kind of godly ambrosia when to mere mortals they sound too long lined and dispersed or too disjointed to offer a musical foundation or dramatic vehicle to carry them through the musical story. Of course enjoyment of music is an individual thing, one can be moved by a single chord, note thematic movement in 2 notes but where is the sin in wanting leitmotifs that are identifiable and powerful of their own right, instantly recognizable and iconic and that propel the drama. To each his own in this respect as well. Desplat did what was required of him with his own style, in his own musical language. If that does not appeal to people, it is really a closed minded thing to call them close minded or foolish for not liking this score.

I understand that this is a much more mature film than the first ones and do not expect the music to be all twinkling with magic and glittering enchantment of childhood. The story at this point is very dark. But what I do expect is a strong, dramatic score that actually says something. Desplat's music does that in places but its musical identity is to me vague. I am a thematic kind of guy who likes his drama coming through clearly and thematic in the music. You can't get that with every score and this to me is that kind of score. I know what I like and am open minded and love to analyze and ponder film music and its connections but if a piece of music does not excite and move me then the mere intellectual merits of how dense or sparse the orchestration and instrumentation is, or how you can throw a needle in a string section and hear it drop so clear is their voice, can't alone create enjoyment and satisfaction. And I can't seem to get hold of this score as it flits through these individual musical moments and to my ears the connecting material is weak.

In time my view on this score might change, especially when I hear it in context, but on its own this music has for me some moments of actual dramatic pull and excitement and the rest is left as half whispered musical statements that do not leave a lasting memory. Could someone please point out the main thematic ideas as they appear on each track so perhaps I could get inside this music.

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Can we quit the freaking "OMG Desplat is ignoring musical continuity by not using previous themes" crap until we've heard the full score?

It's like ROTS. In the film, the force theme plays like every two minutes. But (IIRC) outside of the middle of BOTH and A New Hope, it's barely heard on the OST.

I haven't heard the score yet, but am looking forward to doing so. It just seems crazy that people are going nuts about the themes when this often happens on OSTs, especially when a new composer comes on a series. He's going to want to show his work off, not spend much of the limited running time on new arrangements of other people's music.

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To accuse people of being too attached to Williams' "fluffy and sugary Disney style music" is equally strange. Williams scored his HP movies very appropriately and did what was required of him and if people found that style moving or appealing then that is it. If they expect the same from a mature and darker movie then they will and that is their stance for better or for worse for them and their expectations. If some do not like Williams' approach then that is just fine by me, not everybody can stomach his fantasy writing. But the hostility in some comments, judging people in so acerbic way for liking Williams' HP music, is really strange.

Ah, the voice of reason has returned! ;)

Do we at this point in the thread really need it, though? Hardcore Potter fans bitch at Desplat, others bite back, so what?

I'm not too thrilled about the Desplat at the moment, either, but we are dealing with a thread were people have anger attacks because the partly whimsical and partly sugary themes from movie I and II (and for the love of good, don't take this as a putdown, whimsical and sugary can be quite delicious) are not employed to the fullest in films which would be singlehandedly destroyed by it. So nobody is reprimanded for liking Potter music, just for acting like a jerk in the first place (and no, i do not talk about King Mark, whose dedication to fuill-blown old school adventure scoring i actually endorse).

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I agree with the above sentiments. And JW's scores rule the HP universe as far as i'm concerned, Philosopher's Stone was the score that started it all for me. And you'll never hear me refer to any of his scores as 'Fluffy Disney' as if all Disney work is bad anyway...

That being said, i don't have a problem with people not liking a piece of music which i do. The fact that we can all have a healthy debate about something is all in good fun i think anyway. Discussion is what makes this board great. BUT i do think that calling Desplat's score as 'mediocre as Hooper's' shows a very poorly formed opinion, from the mere technical stand point that a lot more complexity and specific musical construction takes place in this DH score than in its predecessor.

So agree that opinions are neither right or wrong, but i do think that there is such a thing as a very poorly formed opinion. Say that the music does nothing for you, that's fine. However, i don't think its right slag off a composer who clearly is a far more intelligent and thoughtful writer than those who some make the comparison too.

I like reading your opinions on the score Incanus, and i've also said that although i like Desplat's work here, that i wish there was a stronger thematic presence. I do think he got the texture of the score right though. The mood feels like the book to me.

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To call the negative opinions about this score laughable is very strange as everybody is certainly entitled to their opinion and look at this score from their own perspective with respective hopes and expectations and tastes.

It is really not a question of being too closed minded or stupid or slow or dull witted or unanalytical if you do not like some piece of music or even an entire album. It just does not appeal to some people.

To accuse people of being too attached to Williams' "fluffy and sugary Disney style music" is equally strange. Williams scored his HP movies very appropriately and did what was required of him and if people found that style moving or appealing then that is it. If they expect the same from a mature and darker movie then they will and that is their stance for better or for worse for them and their expectations. If some do not like Williams' approach then that is just fine by me, not everybody can stomach his fantasy writing. But the hostility in some comments, judging people in so acerbic way for liking Williams' HP music, is really strange.

Some people wished for more easily identifiable thematic material and they get highbrowed replies that sound like the defenders are on some higher sophisticated plane of existence where they can hear these musical ideas as some kind of godly ambrosia when to mere mortals they sound too long lined and dispersed or too disjointed to offer a musical foundation or dramatic vehicle to carry them through the musical story. Of course enjoyment of music is an individual thing, one can be moved by a single chord, note thematic movement in 2 notes but where is the sin in wanting leitmotifs that are identifiable and powerful of their own right, instantly recognizable and iconic and that propel the drama. To each his own in this respect as well. Desplat did what was required of him with his own style, in his own musical language. If that does not appeal to people, it is really a closed minded thing to call them close minded or foolish for not liking this score.

I understand that this is a much more mature film than the first ones and do not expect the music to be all twinkling with magic and glittering enchantment of childhood. The story at this point is very dark. But what I do expect is a strong, dramatic score that actually says something. Desplat's music does that in places but its musical identity is to me vague. I am a thematic kind of guy who likes his drama coming through clearly and thematic in the music. You can't get that with every score and this to me is that kind of score. I know what I like and am open minded and love to analyze and ponder film music and its connections but if a piece of music does not excite and move me then the mere intellectual merits of how dense or sparse the orchestration and instrumentation is, or how you can throw a needle in a string section and hear it drop so clear is their voice, can't alone create enjoyment and satisfaction. And I can't seem to get hold of this score as it flits through these individual musical moments and to my ears the connecting material is weak.

In time my view on this score might change, especially when I hear it in context, but on its own this music has for me some moments of actual dramatic pull and excitement and the rest is left as half whispered musical statements that do not leave a lasting memory. Could someone please point out the main thematic ideas as they appear on each track so perhaps I could get inside this music.

;)

Isn't he just precious, folks? Little Incanus thinks if he writes long posts with lots and lots of paragraphs, he can somehow make his opinion less laughable. In a way, you have to admire his fighting spirit, even if, in another sense, it's a little sad that he clings to his ignorance with such ferocity.

In the end, though, uninformed, lowbrow opinions like his make for great comic relief. :lol:

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;)

Isn't he just precious, folks? Little Incanus thinks if he writes long posts with lots and lots of paragraphs, he can somehow make his opinion less laughable. In a way, you have to admire his fighting spirit, even if, in another sense, it's a little sad that he clings to his ignorance with such ferocity.

In the end, though, uninformed, lowbrow opinions like his make for great comic relief. :lol:

I would appreciate if you would sometimes contribute more than one sentence or two of scorn, oh so witty and mocking comments, for once. It is nice to know that I am ignorant but please tell me of what am I ignorant or in what way. And wonderful that you think my opinions are lowbrow. Just wonderful. I was really hurt by your post, I really was.

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;)

Isn't he just precious, folks? Little Incanus thinks if he writes long posts with lots and lots of paragraphs, he can somehow make his opinion less laughable. In a way, you have to admire his fighting spirit, even if, in another sense, it's a little sad that he clings to his ignorance with such ferocity.

In the end, though, uninformed, lowbrow opinions like his make for great comic relief. :lol:

I would appreciate if you would sometimes contribute more than one sentence or two of scorn, oh so witty and mocking comments, for once. It is nice to know that I am ignorant but please tell me of what am I ignorant or in what way. And wonderful that you think my opinions are lowbrow. Just wonderful. I was really hurt by your post, I really was.

It's OK, Incanus, don't feel bad. After all, you're not alone. Not everyone can be graced with my appreciation of Desplat's messianic genius.

For the gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to life, and those who find it are few.

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Incanus, don't take him seriously, he's just messing around. :lol: He has a very...unique sense of humor. You should know that your eloquent posts are always appreciated here.

As for the personal jabs and the overreactions to differing musical tastes...I gave up on caring about that stuff around here long ago. ;) Right or wrong, these are part of JWfan's identity, and if you can just laugh it off, it's rather fun.

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David Arnold would be truly terrible.

Not only does his action stuff sound pretty much all the same, I also don't need electronics in this score.

As far as I know he doesn't use any electronic elements in some of his scores (Stargate, Last of the Dogmen, most of ID4, Stepford Wives, Amazing Grace...) and he isn't afraid of writing catchy melodies and quite discernible motifs. Actually, I expect his upcoming Narnia score to beat the s*** out of most of blockbuster scores from recent years.

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As for the personal jabs and the overreactions to differing musical tastes...I gave up on caring about that stuff around here long ago. :lol: Right or wrong, these are part of JWfan's identity, and if you can just laugh it off, it's rather fun.

No JWfanboard without the watchful guardians nursing the revered JW shrine of excellence...and those annoying creatures sneaking on from behind, trying to piss on it.

<_<

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Incanus, don't take him seriously, he's just messing around. <_< He has a very...unique sense of humor. You should know that your eloquent posts are always appreciated here.

Indeed, I always admire inquisitive, articulate writing on these boards, and I regard Incanus as highly as I did Frank Lehman and Scott Fields (Uni) when they were regulars in the community.

Sometimes I miss the mark, but, in general, when the tone of a post of mine is way over the top, it's usually a good sign that I'm trying to make some sort of point, even if, as in this case, it's more emotionally driven than it is substantively or logically driven.

If you're unsure as to how I actually feel about Desplat's work, I've commented more earnestly on him in the past, and you can dig up those posts if you care.

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I like reading your opinions on the score Incanus, and i've also said that although i like Desplat's work here, that i wish there was a stronger thematic presence. I do think he got the texture of the score right though. The mood feels like the book to me.

I agree on the texture. Desplat is certainly using his own compositional voice but I do feel that the music retains the mood and texture of Harry Potter which is a good thing. There is also a slight Williamsesque air to some of the tracks without the music being too underlining of that fact.

Strange..

I can hear subtle Variations of Hedwing's Theme ALL OVER THE PLACE!

It is certainly on several tracks in subtle and not so subtle variations. Desplat pulls that off with style, nodding to JWs direction but keeping the music completely his own.

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I like reading your opinions on the score Incanus, and i've also said that although i like Desplat's work here, that i wish there was a stronger thematic presence. I do think he got the texture of the score right though. The mood feels like the book to me.

I agree on the texture. Desplat is certainly using his own compositional voice but I do feel that the music retains the mood and texture of Harry Potter which is a good thing. There is also a slight Williamsesque air to some of the tracks without the music being too underlining of that fact.

Strange..

I can hear subtle Variations of Hedwing's Theme ALL OVER THE PLACE!

It is certainly on several tracks in subtle and not so subtle variations. Desplat pulls that off with style, nodding to JWs direction but keeping the music completely his own.

I completely share your opinion. I think he pulled that of with class! Congrats Mr. Desplat... looking forward to part 2 !!

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Soundtrack reviewer extraordinaire Jonathan Broxton has posted an exhaustive (and somewhat exhausting) review of the soundtrack album. As always, Broxton's track-by-track analyses are as literate as you'll find, but what caught my eye was his closing flourish:

But what this score has over others in his canon is emotion: unashamed, heart-on-sleeve emotion, which embraces the darkness of the story and runs with it, thrilling the listener with powerful action and forcing the listener to feel Harry’s pain with equal skill.

For me, the first composer that comes to mind when I think "unashamed, heart-on-sleeve emotion" is Basil Poledouris; I really don't think there's much of a contest. And Desplat is about as far away as you can get. (I've written elsewhere about the dearth of emotional content I've detected in Desplat's work.) So for Broxton to forcefully assert the emotionality of Desplat's score is enough to make me go back and revisit the album a few more times.

Granted, Broxton is a major Desplat groupie, but the last time he said something like this, he and I were in complete agreement:

Personally, I have always considered Nyman's work to be beautiful, but sterile. Clinically rendered, perfectly written, but lacking in dramatic and emotional potency. The balance was redressed somewhat with Nyman's last Winterbottom film, Wonderland, and has finally come to fruition here in a score [for The Claim] which virtually overflows with beautiful melodies and emotional power.
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Granted, Broxton is a major Desplat groupie, but the last time he said something like this, he and I were in complete agreement:

Personally, I have always considered Nyman's work to be beautiful, but sterile. Clinically rendered, perfectly written, but lacking in dramatic and emotional potency. The balance was redressed somewhat with Nyman's last Winterbottom film, Wonderland, and has finally come to fruition here in a score [for The Claim] which virtually overflows with beautiful melodies and emotional power.

THE CLAIM is a beaut.

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He's written a few themes actually, but - as was the point of my post - they are quite subtle. Once again, appropriate considering the unfamiliarity the characters themselves are facing.

I don't know. You can justify any decision without seeing the film.

One might very well argue that a repetitive theme would add to the asphyxiating, nowhere-is-safe tone of the film.

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The closed minded-ness here is disgusting me. Having listened to it all, I like it very much. Desplat brought a new sound to the series and a new style of composition, and it works. A lot of you are just way to set in what you like, and many of you were prepared to hate this score before you heard a note of it. Open your minds a bit. Heck, I hated most of the Ron Jones box samples that I heard, yet I just bought it and plan to give it a fair shot. Ben-Hur bored me to death at first, to be honest, but after hearing El Cid and revisting Ben-Hur it suddenly clicked. Just give it a fair shot! One or two listens, out of context of the film no less, are sometimes not enough.

I don't think you quite understood me.

I like the "new style of composition" very much, it's just that, without any more elaborate identity of the score, it leaves a very bitter aftertaste.

And would people please stop justifying the complete upside-down turning of the music by Hooper and Desplat by comparing it to Prisoner Of Azkaban?

Such a comparison is monstrously invalid, since PoA not only sounded like a Harry Potter score (which all that followed did not), it also filled the thematic void with a bagful of themes that are at least as vibrant as any that Williams wrote for Philosopher's Stone and Chamber Of Secrets.

So unless the six additional score tracks on the DH Special Edition reveal another Window To The Past or Double Trouble, stop the nonsense!

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The closed minded-ness here is disgusting me. Having listened to it all, I like it very much. Desplat brought a new sound to the series and a new style of composition, and it works. A lot of you are just way to set in what you like, and many of you were prepared to hate this score before you heard a note of it. Open your minds a bit. Heck, I hated most of the Ron Jones box samples that I heard, yet I just bought it and plan to give it a fair shot. Ben-Hur bored me to death at first, to be honest, but after hearing El Cid and revisting Ben-Hur it suddenly clicked. Just give it a fair shot! One or two listens, out of context of the film no less, are sometimes not enough.

I don't think you quite understood me.

I like the "new style of composition" very much, it's just that, without any more elaborate identity of the score, it leaves a very bitter aftertaste.

And would people please stop justifying the complete upside-down turning of the music by Hooper and Desplat by comparing it to Prisoner Of Azkaban?

Such a comparison is monstrously invalid, since PoA not only sounded like a Harry Potter score (which all that followed did not), it also filled the thematic void with a bagful of themes that are at least as vibrant as any that Williams wrote for Philosopher's Stone and Chamber Of Secrets.

So unless the six additional score tracks on the DH Special Edition reveal another Window To The Past or Double Trouble, stop the nonsense!

I agree 100 percent (i also like Desplat's technical effort and full orchestra treatment but they aren't worth much with scrapping continuity and themes).

These lame comparisons do nothing but weaken all Desplat lovers original arguments further. John Williams did not, in any way change the continuity with Prisoner of Azkaban. He kept the thematic structur with the same "franchise main theme" spread throughout the whole(!) score and two excellent new center point themes for the movie!

And they felt Harry Potter, they sounded like Harry Potter...

Where is this happening in Hoopers scores or Desplat's effort. They both more or less don't care about this huge franchise with its clearly established musical voice and approach and that is so lame and dissapointing. You cannot take this job and do completely your own stuff, that's not the way franchises work.

If you arent narrow minded you can do 90% own stuff and 10% of established "other peoples music" material and you will satisfy almost everyone. Obviously even 90 percent new stuff is not enough for these guys, they want 98 percent own stuff and because the studio requires Hedwig's theme they use it in 2% of the score.

(The percentage numbers are just my guess)

Why deliver some treats to the fans by rearranging some old themes if you can just scrap all, do as if the former films dont exist and just write new music? These composers or directors seem to be pure egoists!!!

You need the recognizability of established themes (and John Williams first three scores define this franchise). Franchises are always compared between themselves and Harry Potter is in that way in terms of music far below Star Wars, Lord of the Rings, Star Trek, Back to the Future, Jurassic Park, even Superman.

If Desplat, Hooper or Doyle only want to do their own stuff they should have stayed away from film franchises. Because there this approach won't work or let's better say it works somehow (for all Hooper and Desplat lovers but the simple Potter fan hasn't heard Desplat's name before and probably wonders where all the themes are) but always with a huge dissapointing aftertaste in the mouth if you see all the possibilities a continuous thematic identity would have provided.

Only Doyle in that way kept the thematic approach but he completely changed the musical style and lacked magic and medieval flare.

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I think the difference is that others here don't necessarily regard the franchise concept as sacrosanct. They might not necessarily care for Harry Potter as a franchise one way or another. Rather, they see it as a series of disparate, even self-contained, films that potentially afford talented composers large canvases upon which to apply their respective brushes.

I do wonder: given a scenario in which Hooper had "established" the "musical voice" for the franchise and Williams had been brought on later in the series, would we have been as insistent that he cleave to the path delineated by Hooper?

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Self contained films in a 8 movie franchise with ongoing story and characters -- except the first one thats not the case here

Not many people would be even interested in these films without the franchise and the books, as a reader you mainly just want to know how it ends and therefore you read through even

mediocre books

In reply to Hlao-roo:

Your scenario is so far fetched it's hard to discuss it... <_<

They would only get Williams after Hooper if the first two scores were so horrible that they would want John Williams to save what's left from these movies. He wouldn't have a choice other than recreate the horrible Hooper fallout then.

In another universe if Hooper in the first film had delivered a widely accepted, excellent main theme i shure as hell would expect Williams to use it.

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Anyways, this score is continuing growing on me, from the samples, of course. It has a very powerful identity, unspoken, but instantly recognizable. It's like Voldemort. It's not a Hollywood score. No. It's a quintessentially European score...and it makes it a perfect match for a European

What gobsmacks me is that people think Prisoner of Azkaban seems to retroactively belong in the soundscape of HP1 and HP2.

I remember when that came out, everyone bitched and moaned about how it didn't fit the established HP sound, that it was devoid of really truly memorable themes, that the new themes were not used well throughout the soundtrack, just in a couple of concert tracks. All this same bullshit.

You guys are really predictable. Two years later you'll be going "Oh yeah! Lovegood was one of my favorite themes from HP!"

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You guys are really predictable. Two years later you'll be going "Oh yeah! Lovegood was one of my favorite themes from HP!"

I dunno about that. It's not John Williams after all. <_< We have no obligation to lick Desplat's balls.

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I think we can all agree Sky Battle is the best action cue to grace Harry Potter since Quidditch, Third Year.

I love the uncomfortable descending woodwinds transitioning into strings that graces "Snape to Malfoy Manor" twice. Makes my hairs stand on end! You can clearly feel and see the dark and stormy night in that track.

I LOVE the twisted version of what I presume to be the main theme that plays near the end of Dobby. And what I'm referring to as the main theme you can hear in Death Eaters and Snape to Malfoy Manor, you can hear over the propulsive rhythms of the two tracks on different instruments. And again you hear it at the beginning of "Locket" in twisted form, and then in its normal variety without the twists.

It can also be heard gently playing near the end of Godric's Hollow Grave. I only refer to it as the main theme because it's the most appearing theme on the soundtrack.

It plays again over The Deathly Hallows, and you can hear it playing at the end of that track. At minimum it's about 4 notes, but the way it twists and turns throughout the soundtrack is remarkable.

You hear it again in "Rescuing Hermione" at the beginning and towards the end, and damn does it develop nicely there.

You hear it all over "The Burrow", and gets a positive development into a really pretty theme in that track. With high strings and even a pretty choir.

You hear it trying to break through in "Sky Battle" and then it plays on woodwinds right as the action winds down.

It's practically in every track. And its barest minimum statement it is 4 notes, but it has a lot of different things going on, and really transforms and moves in a variety of directions. It's about 9 note in full. It's a very close relative of Hedwig's Theme.

I think being at its bare minimum, 4 or 5 notes, people are going to draw comparison to Doyle's Goblet of Fire theme. But in this situation it is far more intricately developed than that theme.

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I haven't listened to the whole thing yet, but so far I generally like what I'm hearing. Strong writing is there, I'm not sure about the thematic identity though. It seems there are several great secondary themes but not a single good main theme. But then again The Golden Compass also seemed like this at first, but now I love it.

The thing that most people don't realize is that there is no coming back to JW's first two scores (or even Azkaban). There is less and less of Hedwig's theme with each score. I think if Williams was asked to do it there wouldn't be much of a difference in tone. Maybe more memorable themes. But it would have been declared as a major disappointment.

Karol

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Whether or not the single main theme is "good" or not, is subjective to your own taste and psychological profile. But there's definitely a main theme there.

I think if Williams was asked to do it there wouldn't be much of a difference in tone. Maybe more memorable themes. But it would have been declared as a major disappointment.

I agree.

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As I said I haven't listened to the whole thing yet. There is some thematic material that I've noticed, but nothing to strike me the way Williams' or Doyle's material did. That's what I meant. And I do like Desplat quite a bit.

But I like the Hedwig's theme-based theme quite a bit. A clever touch.

Karol

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I'm listening again in a more comfy environment (not at work IOW - I had to keep stopping it to talk to people) and it's much better this time round. He seems to be a composer who can maintain interest without quoting repeated melodies, and the score does project for me a feeling of hopelessness, and a feeling that the characters don't really know what they're doing.

However, thematically, I'm hearing absolutely nothing and I'm suspecting that this might be a Yates thing. Hooper's scores were both subtle, and very restrained and I suspect he's asked the same of Desplat. Doesn't mean it's not well crafted, just that it takes longer to get its meaning.

I have the same problem as many here - jumping to a conclusion waaaay too fast. Time will tell.

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