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2011 Academy Awards Thread


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Umm... The Lord of the Rings trilogy? Didn't they record and re-record this music like 70 times over these four-something years?

I mean, John Williams hardly ever did any adjustments to his scores.

Karol

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Umm... The Lord of the Rings trilogy? Didn't they record and re-record this music like 70 times over these four-something years?

Considering the scale of this particular project, and the fact that Shore was involved with the whole process during 4 years, I would not say that this is unreasonable.

Far better then doing it the Lucas way and edit the score to hell after the Composer left.

I mean, John Williams hardly ever did any adjustments to his scores.

Karol

I'm sure John Williams has had to many many adjustments to his scores because of either a change in the edit or a request from the director/producer.

It's a pretty normal thing in film scoring

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Yes, but not to this extent. Howard Shore must have been completely exhausted at the end.

Considering the scale of this particular project, and the fact that Shore was involved with the whole process during 4 years, I would not say that this is unreasonable.

Far better then doing it the Lucas way and edit the score to hell after the Composer left.

I'm not saying this is reasonable or not. Or that it's good or not. You said that it's the future where director has input into this previously restricted area. And it also happened in that case. I'm not talking about the result, but rather the process itself.

Karol

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I'm talking about the director meticulously creating his version of a score, without the composers involvement.

With LOTR, Shore was definitely involved throughout the whole process, and the end product is certainly the result of his work, despite the input of Jackson.

The fact that Jackson and Shore could not see eye to eye on King Kong proves that Shore was not willing to bow to every one of PJ's wishes.

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It'll be interesting to see them working on The Hobbit. I always like it when directors return to their collaborators. I'm still waiting for Fincher to get back with Shore, but seems like Reznor and Ross are his new go-to men. Scorsese is also going back to Shore for Hugo Cabaret.

Woah, all of them deal with Howard Shore :lol:

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Woah, all of them deal with Howard Shore :lol:

Howard Shore is an interesting composer, for sure. But I'd like him to do something else apart from brooding thriller scores. Don't get me wrong, I liked Edge of Darkness, but whenever someone pushes him a bit farther, it's pure gold. We don't need to look any further than his score for Scorsese.

Karol

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I think the interesting in this decade so far is that...everything is fashionable in almost every industry, music, clothing, writing. Strange. In the past it's generally been one or the other with few exceptions. These last 3-4 years in film/TV music minimalism, pop, romantic/orchestral are all popular.

Just look at the nominees this year. There's a huge amount of range. Social Network (Eccentric electronics), How to Train Your Dragon (Orchestral Bombast), The King's Speech (Subdued Orchestral), 127 Hours (Pop/Compilation), Inception (Modern Bombast)

Compare with say...1999:

American Beauty (Subdued orchestral), Angela's Ashes (Subdued orchestral), The Cider House Rules (Subdued Orchestral), The Talented Mr. Ripley (Subdued Orchestral/Compilation), The Red Violin (Subdued Orchestral).

I would actually have to say the Academy actually made pretty good nominations this year.

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So you're saying they didn't even do what they were awarded for?

Karol

See how ridiculous the entire thing is. I guess the Academy even didn't know this.

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I wonder if there is a message board for cinematography fans bemoaning Roger Deakins' ninth loss, and if they are saying Wally Pfister is a hack who didn't really do much for "Inception" other than know how to work his light meter. I have seen fan pages for the Coen brothers, and I am sure those are on fire now.

I was surprised by the score win, because I thought Desplat would win in an awards sweep for "The King's Speech." But that sweep didn't happen.

I do agree that film music has not been the same in the past five years. Such scores as "Up" and "Atonement" aside, the Academy has not had much to work with in choosing five viable nominees. I am glad the Academy made the score to "Black Swan" ineligible, because I fear the Academy would have voted for it, in the same way they voted for "Babel." What needs to be done to get back to the glory years of the 1980s and 1990s? I have no clue. The living composers we all seem to agree on as the best aren't doing much work these days, leaving the newbies (and Desplat) to fill in the gaps with Media Ventures-inspired stuff.

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Whilst I am not a massive fan of the score, Reznor has a lot of talent and I hope this can potentially be a springboard for him to bring his more traditional musical abilities to film scoring. Even if it just means we'll get another song like 'Hurt'.

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The score nominations this year were fairly spot on. I wouldn't have objected to any of them winning. They got it right with 2007 (nominations-wise at least, Atonement was the least deserving) and 2009 as well.

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Ratatouille and 3:10 To Yuma were infinitely better. The score was nice, but it was applauded for it's original use of the typewriter within the music, which was done like two years before with Ramin Djawadi and Heitor Pereira's score for Ask The Dust.

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The score nominations this year were fairly spot on.

I would rather have nominated Desplat for Potter than for King's Speech, which was nice enough, but didn't make that much of an impact on me, partly because the primary scenes were (excellently) tracked with classical music. I wouldn't have minded to see Burwell nominated though. True Grit, while not a great score (were there any this year?), seemed quite wonderful.

Ah well. At least Newman won.

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I would have replaced The King's Speech with The Ghost Writer, but like you said, it's still a nice score. I'm not a fan of Randy Newman, but I thought his speech was one of the best of the night. He pointed out a glaring issue with the Academy.

Burwell's score was mostly adaptations of classic hymns, and was thus disqualified. Worked well in the movie, but he's done much much better IMO.

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I wonder if there is a message board for cinematography fans bemoaning Roger Deakins' ninth loss, and if they are saying Wally Pfister is a hack who didn't really do much for "Inception" other than know how to work his light meter. I have seen fan pages for the Coen brothers, and I am sure those are on fire now.

Deakins actually runs his own message board on his official site, and things got so out of hand on there when he lost to There Will Be Blood a few years ago that he declared he would delete every thread related to the Oscars in the future. So I think they know better, by now :P

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Oops I meant the memorium, you know the williamsy sounding one.

I don;t remember

But the kids was Over the Rainbow right?

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Oops I meant the memorium, you know the williamsy sounding one.

Are you sure? I know for sure Conrad Pope did some arranging and orchestrations for this year's show, but I don't know about Williams being involved--he's quite busy scoring War Horse right now (score will be recorded in late March/early April).

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I'm not a big fan of drama scores, but this one is fantastic. Not only because of the interplay between music and sound effects throughout the film (the typewriter, piano, lighter, organ, chorus, harmonica and other stuff), but it is such beautifully constructed and performed piece of music. There are many recurring themes, among them a very bittersweet love theme. I love the score both in the film and on album. It's a terrific listen.

BTW did it win anything?

Karol

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Hardly surprising.

It brings to mind a quote I heard on an FSM podcast just before Santaollala got his 2nd oscar, and Morricone was receiving an honorary award; something along the lines of:

Do you realise, that depending on the order of the ceremony, Gustavo Santaollala could have two oscars before Ennio Morricone has one?

Quiet (almost awed) voice in the background: My god....

Even Doug and the team have seemingly been in disbelief at oscar choices :)

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Wait, what? Roger Deakins has no Oscar?

Blasphemy!

(I mean seriously, wtf?)

He definitely deserves one, but True Grit is not his best work.

Deakins should have won for Jesse James though, but the double nomination probably split the vote and There Will Be Blood took the gold.

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I don't know who arranged it for the Oscars, but the "In Memoriam" song was "Smile," written by Charlie Chaplin for Modern Times. It was performed by Celine Dion.

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I don't know who arranged it for the Oscars, but the "In Memoriam" song was "Smile," written by Charlie Chaplin for Modern Times. It was performed by Celine Dion.

FYI, I have it confirmed that the arrangement was done by William Ross.

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