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SCORE: Suite from Memoirs of a Geisha for Cello and Orchestra


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The Suite from Memoirs of a Geisha is a concert work based on John Williams’ 2005 film score of the same name. The piece is written for a symphony orchestra and a cello soloist. Williams wrote it spec

Excellent analysis, for which I thank you. I love the cohesiveness of the suite as a whole, the intricate beauty of the cello lines, and the orchestration. This suite, in my mind, represents the perfect synthesis of William's approaches to film writing and his straight concert works. It is engaging, complex, and original but speaks with a very universal musical voice.

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Excellent analysis, for which I thank you. I love the cohesiveness of the suite as a whole, the intricate beauty of the cello lines, and the orchestration. This suite, in my mind, represents the perfect synthesis of William's approaches to film writing and his straight concert works. It is engaging, complex, and original but speaks with a very universal musical voice.

Thank you guys! :)

I agree with you whole heartedly. This piece does indeed represent a great balance of Williams' film and concert work traits. For me the joy of hearing new variations on the older material is equal to hearing a cohesive self contained work for orchestra that shows all the great qualities of John Williams' music.

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I've been obsessed with this score in the past few days (listening to the soundtrack, watching scenes from the movie to listen to the unreleased cues, taking notes etc.), and all this due to this suite that I heard for the first time now.

What I loved about it most is that Sayuri's theme (in the first movement) is FINALLY harmonized (at 2.56 and 3.06 it changes chords) , while in all its statements in the film, ost and the signature edition recording is backed up in its entirety by a tonic pedal.

 

I guess it's the spot that Incanus describes as:

Quote

pushes the melody further, opening it into a more emotional statement than any heard in the film

 

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