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SCORE: The Lost World Jurassic Park (John Williams) - A Complete Score Analysis


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Now here is a long post! I hope you enjoy it as much as I enjoyed writing it. And if there are any correction suggestions fire away, especially on the nuts and bolts of music theory of which I profes

You can be sure that this analysis will most certainly receive an update after the John Williams Jurassic Park Collection is released. Which is just one day away!   Looking forward to both m

I like it when the keep the original manuscript titles on expanded releases. Though I can see why they changed that one cue title in 1941

  • 2 weeks later...

No, it's not. I liked it the way it was. It's a product of its time and should stay that way.

And Han shot first.

Karol

Wait until you see the magnificent paragraphs I added willy nilly all over the analysis that were typed against a green screen in a backlot far away from the actual keyboard. You see I typed this analysis back in the day when modern keyboard technique wasn't advanced enough for some really cool things I can achieve with this new technology. In a way I had to wait for the technology to catch up to my original vision. This is in a way the version of the analysis I would have originally written had I had the means to do it.

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You know what I find really phenomenal about the entire musical sequence of Truck Stop? The moment when the two T-Rexs come out, that section of the music with the bells. It just captures a feeling of doom. On top of that, the moment they appear; their foot falls are signaled specifically by the music if you take away the sound effects. It is quoting both the Carnivore motif from the first film and the variation of it used in this film.

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You know what I find really phenomenal about the entire musical sequence of Truck Stop? The moment when the two T-Rexs come out, that section of the music with the bells. It just captures a feeling of doom. On top of that, the moment they appear; their foot falls are signaled specifically by the music if you take away the sound effects. It is quoting both the Carnivore motif from the first film and the variation of it used in this film.

It's amazing, isn't it? I think you're the first person to ever mention that.

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  • 4 weeks later...

A very interesting observation Johnny. Could you provide the time stamps for the Carnivore motifs in the section of the Truck Stop you mention?

And yes it is a brilliant bit of music most TLW score fans lament as missing from the OST. Since it was not an insert or added late in the scoring process it must be a conscious edit for the album which is a real head scratcher.

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In the cue, Truck Stop, a variation of the carnivore motif appears at 2:52-3:00, 2:59-3:06, and a build up with two extra notes at 3:07-3:18. Obviously, the full cue is unreleased, so I revisited the scene from the film itself for the exact timing in the cue.

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  • 1 year later...

You can be sure that this analysis will most certainly receive an update after the John Williams Jurassic Park Collection is released. Which is just one day away!

 

Looking forward to both musical revelations from all the unreleased music and from Mike Matessino in the liner notes.

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OK revisions done to the whole analysis bringing it up to date with info found on the LLL release of the score and taking in consideration the actual unreleased music (not just mock-ups).

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It's very much down to the beats of the scene what kind of dynamics such a single moment might have in the film. While the score does have specific textures that become thematic in themselves (e.g. the Compys) I am not quite convinced this San Diego moment counts as thematic per se.

 

EDIT: I made a small adjustment to the Neighbourhood Visitor as a concession just for you Mañuel. ;) 

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4 hours ago, Incanus said:

It's very much down to the beats of the scene what kind of dynamics such a single moment might have in the film. While the score does have specific textures that become thematic in themselves (e.g. the Compys) I am not quite convinced this San Diego moment counts as thematic per se.

 

EDIT: I made a small adjustment to the Neighbourhood Visitor as a concession just for you Mañuel. ;) 

Awesome!:up::banana:

 

 

:blush2:

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  • 2 years later...
39 minutes ago, bollemanneke said:

Hi Incannus, I'm slowly reading your (obviously) brilliant analysis and have a question about the hunt. You write that JW was dismayed that this marvellous cue went unused. Where did you hear that information? Can you elaborate/provide a quote?

Ah I forgot to mention the source in the analysis itself but it was Conrad Pope who mentioned this little bit of information on his Facebook page a number of years ago.

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