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What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)


Mr. Breathmask

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I really love all three of the original movies and look forward to revisiting them again when the new remasters come out

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Oh yeah, I left out that the blu looks fantastic.

 

 

I have no way of playing 4k discs and ToD looks amazing on blu too, so I'd only want to buy Raiders separately if they put the new masters out on blu. They did it with Schindler, I have that one, so I'm hopeful.

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I'd imagine their new 4K remasters will come to 4K disc, Blu Ray disc, and DVD disc - and streaming services

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On 5/25/2021 at 8:01 AM, Naïve Old Fart said:

OK, coffee's been drunk.

KK doesn't like DUNE???!!!

:kaboom:

Bring. It. On!!!!

 

Speaking of which:

 

 

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@Naïve Old Fart ... welllll, I was MOSTLY mentioning actors making early or debut appearances and Mirren had been doing movies for over a decade when she appeared in Excalibur. 

And @AC1, the photography was what I meant when I called the film 'stylish'. 

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On 5/27/2021 at 2:09 PM, Sweeping Strings said:

it's muddy, bloody and has some of the cast in the nuddy

 

Only in fits-and-stops. A lot of the movie has this gleaming, tin-foil feel to it: the shiny armour, the gleaming Camelot, the gauzy photography and some over-the-top performances, be it the eccentric Merlin or all the shouting that happens in the first 30-40 minutes. Kinda feels incongrous.

 

A very uneven film, ultimately. The story is certainly very fractured - it plays almost like an anthology film.

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Midnight in Paris. 

 

Should, should I, write this the way, the way Owen, Owen Wilson spent, spent the whole, whole movie talking? No, better not, right? The opening sequence was great and it’s quite something to hear Americans say ‘Sorbonne’. Most of the actors are great, but I still don’t like Cotillard (and no one says Paris in French in an English sentence with a theatrical pause). This was my first Carla Bruni movie too and Kathy bates is always great. Sadly, however, the second half was pure garbage. Dalí was the guy who made it go all downhill, really. Also, how did the two leads end up together in the first place? They have nothing in common! I’m sure marriages of convenience were a thing in the 20s, but in 2010? And why did he not just stay with those people from the past? Nobody was forcing him to leave. Okay, I’ll just say it: Even Moulin Rouge was way better. There. How did this get good reviews?!

Most of the music is inexplicably moved to the left channel and one period song has vinyl clicks and pops over it, which doesn’t really contribute to the ‘authentic’ experience. Some of those songs were really fun, but I can only stand so many romantic cues for accordion. What did stand out were two pieces that are also used in titanic, which I’ll be re-watching tomorrow. Now, where’s my vintage car? I’d like to return to 23 November 2018, or to my holidays in Bath or Ireland.

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The Beguiled (2017) 

 

image-w1280.jpg

 

Was searching for something to watch on Netflix and decided on The Beguiled without even knowing it's a Sofia Coppola movieAnyway, I ended up liking it and I'm pretty sure Lars von Trier (remember him?) would have loved to have made this movie as well for it has his kind of psychological underpinnings. 7/10

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Internal Affairs - moody cop thriller with IAD colleagues Andy Garcia and Laurie Metcalf investigating corrupt officer Richard Gere. Gere is great as a manipulative womanizing bastard.

Pet Sematary (2019) - reasonably creepy and unsettling second adaptation of the Stephen King novel. Admittedly I haven't seen the late 80s one.

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Minority Report (2002)

 

Another gem that's currently 'free' on youtube. (enjoy all the ads)

 

Still as fun as ever.  The spiders scene and cue has no business being that well shot and scored.

 

The hardest thing to believe in this film is that PreCrime wouldn't have shut off Anderton's access to the building and temple.  Maybe it was a miss, maybe they didn't so they could trap him, or maybe it's to highlight that PreCrime wasn't perfect.  Not a dealbreaker, but always made me kind of shake my head when he enters and the security voice says something like "access for John Anderton" :rolleyes:

 

Colin Farrell is still my favorite in this film.

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2 hours ago, Bellosh said:

The hardest thing to believe in this film is that PreCrime wouldn't have shut off Anderton's access to the building and temple.  Maybe it was a miss, maybe they didn't so they could trap him, or maybe it's to highlight that PreCrime wasn't perfect.  Not a dealbreaker, but always made me kind of shake my head when he enters and the security voice says something like "access for John Anderton" :rolleyes:

 

Ha!  I caught a bit of this on Pluto the other night and had similar thoughts at that same exact point!

 

2 hours ago, Bellosh said:

Colin Farrell is still my favorite in this film.

 

He's great in this!

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11 hours ago, Bellosh said:

The hardest thing to believe in this film is that PreCrime wouldn't have shut off Anderton's access to the building and temple.  Maybe it was a miss, maybe they didn't so they could trap him, or maybe it's to highlight that PreCrime wasn't perfect.  Not a dealbreaker, but always made me kind of shake my head when he enters and the security voice says something like "access for John Anderton"

Yeah, that's a significant weak point.  But it is a well put together flick still.  

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Terminator 2: Judgement Day

 

This is pretty much the perfect blockbuster movie. It has amazing special effects and stunts (which look great until this day), but it also has memorable characters and a nice script. Edward Furlong delivers one of the best performances by a child actor in an action film. The score isn't something I'd listen outside of the movie, but it works great with the pictures. 

 

Happy 30th birthday!

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15 hours ago, Bellosh said:

The hardest thing to believe in this film is that PreCrime wouldn't have shut off Anderton's access to the building and temple.  Maybe it was a miss, maybe they didn't so they could trap him, or maybe it's to highlight that PreCrime wasn't perfect.  Not a dealbreaker, but always made me kind of shake my head when he enters and the security voice says something like "access for John Anderton" :rolleyes:

 

True. But's it's basically Hollywood IT security 101. Security clearances are only revoked if the hero can short the security circuits via two wires in a wall panel.

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The Conversation - 'enjoyed' is maybe not the right word for a movie so bleakly paranoid (there's stuff in it that wouldn't shame a horror film), but there's no denying Gene Hackman's excellence as for-hire surveillance expert Harry Caul (a man who lives as impersonal a life as possible) who fears that the audio tapes he has submitted to his client are going to result in murder and attempts to prevent it. Also features a pre-Han Solo Harrison Ford.

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3 hours ago, Sweeping Strings said:

The Conversation - 'enjoyed' is maybe not the right word for a movie so bleakly paranoid (there's stuff in it that wouldn't shame a horror film), but there's no denying Gene Hackman's excellence as for-hire surveillance expert Harry Caul (a man who lives as impersonal a life as possible) who fears that the audio tapes he has submitted to his client are going to result in murder and attempts to prevent it. Also features a pre-Han Solo Harrison Ford.

Hackman is utterly incredible in that.  One of the great playing against type performances. And he was not even nominated for an Oscar.  For shame.  

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On 5/31/2021 at 3:30 PM, Edmilson said:

Terminator 2: Judgement Day

 

This is pretty much the perfect blockbuster movie. It has amazing special effects and stunts (which look great until this day), but it also has memorable characters and a nice script. Edward Furlong delivers one of the best performances by a child actor in an action film. The score isn't something I'd listen outside of the movie, but it works great with the pictures. 

 

Happy 30th birthday!


Textbook example of how to make an action film.

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Tremors

 

Good Jaws-inspired horror movie with great pratical effects and fun characters. The score, which apparently was composed by Police Academy's Robert Folk, was pretty good.

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2 hours ago, Edmilson said:

Tremors

 

Good Jaws-inspired horror movie with great pratical effects and fun characters. The score, which apparently was composed by Police Academy's Robert Folk, was pretty good.

The sequel is the best direct-to-video sequel ever!

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11 hours ago, JoeinAR said:

Im on vacation next week but decided to stay home. Will be watching lots of black and white filmz

 

Which ones are on your list?

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Hey! Granted I do like a good action thriller, but there's always room for 'quieter' stuff too ... it's just that during the pandemic I've tended towards the likes of the former, because escapism has become preferable as a result IMO. 
 

20 hours ago, AC1 said:

Sweepers probably expected some kind of Popeye Doyle movie. You know how he is!

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13 hours ago, Edmilson said:

Tremors

 

Good Jaws-inspired horror movie with great pratical effects and fun characters. The score, which apparently was composed by Police Academy's Robert Folk, was pretty good.

 

Not really my thing, but I have a friend who loves these movies and does a marathon of them every year.  First one is a cult classic, and the rest are all entertaining sequels to one degree or another if you're willing to switch off your brain and go with it. Burt Gummer is a great character.

 

The original recently had a 4K HDR release with a new transfer and restored print which looks beautiful.

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Scorpio (1973). Solid cold war cat and mouse spy thriller with Burt Lancaster and Alain Delon (and a charming Paul Scofield), lots of bad looping, and a middle half set in Vienna. The USP for people familiar with Vienna is an extended kinetic (with funky score by Jerry Fielding) chase sequence across the construction site of Vienna's first subway (which opened 5 years later) on Karlsplatz, now one of the city's main subway hubs.

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Goodbye Christopher Robin. 

 

That was pretty good. Stephen Campbell sounded oddly familiar, I still don’t like talkative kids, but I did finally watch a Domhnall Gleeson movie in which I liked him. And speaking of liking people, I need to re-watch Brave, need more Kelly Macdonald.

The score was equally good. I can’t believe how versatile Carter Burwell is (and that I was introduced to him through Twilight, urgh). One cue in particular stood out, the one where the score suddenly ‘joined in’ with the bullies. Huh, that’s the second time I’ve heard an old train whistling tonight, the other instance coming from Schindler’s List in another room.

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4 minutes ago, JoeinAR said:

Haven't really decided yet. Saboteur for one.

 

Good one. Is the similarly titled Hitchcock film Sabotage as good?

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I like both but Saboteur is edgier and very much like the way things are going today.

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The Exorcist

 

I didn't liked it very much when I first watched it, but now seeing it again I can see why this movie is considered a classic. It has better characters, screenplay and direction than most horror movies, specially blockbusters.

 

I like how Friedkin's direction is very realistic, almost like he was shooting a documentary.

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2 hours ago, Edmilson said:

It has better characters, screenplay and direction than most horror movies, specially blockbusters.

 

It succeeds more (extraordinarily well, actually) as the character story of father Karras than as the horror story of MacNeil family.

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My cousin Rachel. 

 

That’s funny, this is the third 20th Century Fox film I’ve turned on this weekend. Everyone minus, Sam Claflin was great. I really need to watch some Strike episodes because I want to see more of Holliday Grainger. The guy was weird, though, and it all went a little too quickly as well. I think if they had added 20 more minutes, he might have seemed less deranged, or the story might have been a little more coherent? The ending was really great, but Even Rachel Weisz had weak moments. Also, was it so hard to add a caption saying this was set in the 1830s?

The score, on the other hand, was a great discovery. It might have been a tad repetitive, but this one could easily have been written by James Horner. No OST, how typical.

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Dumb and Dumber

 

First time watched since it came out.

Not as funny as I remember esp. the pre- Aspen section.

The product placement was shocking !

 

 

 

 

 

 

12 hours ago, Edmilson said:

Exorcist

 

I like how Friedkin's direction is very realistic, almost like he was shooting a documentary.

That's what was so innovative.

At the time it came out, it was totally unique!

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Saving Private Ryan

 

I vastly prefer The Thin Red Line from the same year, and its melodramatic score to the more discreet Williams score.

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On 10/4/2017 at 5:43 AM, BloodBoal said:

7OCAgq8.jpg

 

Week-End À Zuydcoote (a.k.a. Weekend At Dunkirk) - Henri Verneuil (1964)

 

To anyone who hasn't watched Dunkirk yet: you'd be better off watching Week-End À Zuydcoote than wasting your time with Nolan's latest flick. It's a superior film in every way: technically and visually more impressive (if you thought Dunkirk made the whole operation feel too small-scale, this film will leave you much more satisfied), musically much more enjoyable, and storywise more engaging. The film also has more interesting things to say about that particular operation as well as war in general, and it does so via many memorable scenes (with a great balance of seriousness and irony). It comes highly recommended (people like @publicist and @Muad'Dib would probably like it, methinks)!

 

8/10

 

http://pics.imcdb.org/0is48/chevroletcanadard9.6996.jpg

http://i.imgur.com/NEzzxX5.jpg

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http://www.imcdb.org/i042768.jpg

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P.S.: Found this rather funny video, in which a guy recreated the Dunkirk trailer with footage from Week-End À Zuydcoote and which shows how much of an unabashed plagiarist Nolan is!

 

 

 

Charles Aznavour wrote a song for this movie (music by Maurice Jarre): "Le monde est sous nos pas".

 

I saw that the score by Maurice Jarre was recently expanded.

 

Maurice Jarre – Bande Originale Du Film Week-End A Zuydcoote (1964, Vinyl)  - Discogs

 

 

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One more thought that struck me: In today's media world, Gattaca would probably be a Black Mirror story. And as per Charlie Brooker's M.O. (modus operandi), that would probably focus its criticism on the social consequences of eugenic birth control rather than the technology for its own sake.

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I agree with Marian. Even since I first watched it in school (because it was a trendy thing for science teachers to play), I always found its science and philosophy grossly over-simplified. But aesthetically, it touched on a visual and sonic language that I think was a compelling way to dive into thoughtful scientific query in film. An aesthetic that neither Niccol nor many directors/film since have managed to effectively capitalize on since.

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The Predator ... 

Shane Black - I know, this time the military guys will all have PTSD to *hilarious* effect! And there'll be a cute kid with Asperger's! And a beautiful yet feistily kickass female scientist! And the Predators will have badly-CGIed dog things! 

A saner world than ours - Oh Shane. We liked The Nice Guys .. why would you do this to us, Shane? WHY?!? 

The world we actually live in - biggest hit of the franchise to date.  

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Yea, what a disappointment that turned out to be.

 

From 1979-1990 both the Aliens and Predator franchises were amazing and the mind brimmed with the possibilities each could go in.  And I've been disapointed in every single theatrical entry in each ever since.  We're now in a world where those were good for 11 years and crap for 31 and counting...

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19 hours ago, KK said:

I agree with Marian. Even since I first watched it in school (because it was a trendy thing for science teachers to play), I always found its science and philosophy grossly over-simplified. But aesthetically, it touched on a visual and sonic language that I think was a compelling way to dive into thoughtful scientific query in film. An aesthetic that neither Niccol nor many directors/film since have managed to effectively capitalize on since.

 

It's interesting, because despite this, I have a lot of respect for the film. Perhaps it's its anachronistic nature that makes it easier to forgive its seemingly anachronistic core views. It's also worth noting that they did cut some of them, perhaps because they thought they were taking them too far - or perhaps just making them too on the nose; after all, they did keep some of the stuff.

 

Your comment also made me realise that I haven't seen anything Niccol has done post Lord of War.

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21 hours ago, Jay said:

Yea, what a disappointment that turned out to be.

 

From 1979-1990 both the Aliens and Predator franchises were amazing and the mind brimmed with the possibilities each could go in.  And I've been disapointed in every single theatrical entry in each ever since.  We're now in a world where those were good for 11 years and crap for 31 and counting...


I haven't minded some of the other entries in the Alien franchise (the third was an interesting experiment, and I'm not a hater of either Prometheus or Covenant) and Predator 2 was a fairly decent sequel ... but yeah, Resurrection and Alien Vs. Predator disappointed (didn't even bother with the second one) as did Predators.  

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Nocturnal animals. 

 

Not really sure how to summarise my feelings. Okay, I’ll never watch it again because I’m too emotional to cope with this sort of kidnapping scenes. The second half was a little muddled too and I have no idea how the detective got his job. Unprofessional through and through. Also, I’m not really a symbolism/metaphor person. Actors were great.

This was my first Abel Korzeniowski score as well. The opening cue sounded really promising, but apart from the detailed mix and one very effective cue for violins, it unexpectedly degenerated into repetitive ostinatos. He reminds me of Craig Armstrong: very talented, but possibly being forced to stay in the background. Tell him, Tony.

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