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What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)


Mr. Breathmask

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8 minutes ago, crocodile said:

I did not like the first movie at all.

 

Well, at least we can agree on that. 

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4 hours ago, AC1 said:

Well, at least we can agree on that. 

 

Its just about the only superhero film in recent memory that's actually played straight!

 

I loved that about it.

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14 hours ago, crocodile said:

Wonder Woman 1984. Call me crazy but I quite liked it. It is bit silly and the pacing is on the slow side but I definitely didn't expect to enjoy it as much as I did. Perhaps it's low expectations but definitely not a disaster and better than the first one. 

 

Karol

Zimmer's score is so good and effective, it makes the movie seem better than it actually is.

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I didn't like either Wonder Woman movie

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48 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

 

Its just about the only superhero film in recent memory that's actually played straight!

 

I loved that about it.

 

Aren't you forgetting ... The Snyder Cut?

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10 minutes ago, May the Force be with You said:

Me neither. Although I found the second worst because it raises so many messed up questions.

I agree what the wish stone thingy is a can of worms and the resurrection of Steve Trevor is, shall we say, problematic. It hasn't actually occurred to me until this morning. :lol:

 

And yes @Edmilsonit is probably largely because of Hans Zimmer's score that I enjoyed this film. And Gal Gadot.

 

Karol

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Wonder Woman. Decided to revisit it for the first time since the cinema release. OK, I might have been bit harsh as it is better than I remember. Having said that, there's something tasteless about setting this story against a real world catastrophic event. Doesn't feel right and makes you wonder what was she up to during WWII. And it is annoyed you have to sit through 2.5 hours through a movie where you're essentially several steps of the main character. It's likeable enough but feels way too drawn out. 

 

Karol - who tends to comfuse some of the plot elements and characters between this and The First Avenger

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Rust Creek (2018)

 

rust_creek_1280.jpg

 

Pretty city girl runs into trouble with some rural locals and the Draxian sherriff isn't really helpful. Will she survive?

 

 

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4 hours ago, crocodile said:

And it is annoyed you have to sit through 2.5 hours through a movie where you're essentially several steps of the main character

 

What does this sentence mean?

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That's not the only faulty part of that confusing sentence!

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5 hours ago, crocodile said:

And it is annoyed you

 

5 hours ago, crocodile said:

sit through 2.5 hours through

 

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Swiftkey used to be a good Android keyboard but ever since Microsoft bought them it's been slowly declining

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I only saw this movie once and don't remember many details.  In what way is the audience ahead of the main character?

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The Intruder (2019)

 

MV5BNTczMzc4NDY0MF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwMjI3

 

While not particularly a good movie, it's an easy watch. Dennis Quaid's over-the-top performance is good fun. 

 

The-Intruder-Dennis-Quaid.png

 

Looks familiar?

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On 7/20/2021 at 4:08 AM, crocodile said:

Wonder Woman. Decided to revisit it for the first time since the cinema release. OK, I might have been bit harsh as it is better than I remember. Having said that, there's something tasteless about setting this story against a real world catastrophic event. Doesn't feel right and makes you wonder what was she up to during WWII. And it is annoyed you have to sit through 2.5 hours through a movie where you're essentially several steps of the main character. It's likeable enough but feels way too drawn out. 

 

Karol - who tends to comfuse some of the plot elements and characters between this and The First Avenger

There is nothing wrong with setting it against the great war as a backdrop. It may not have provided accurate WWI history but it likely planted a seed of thought. Since there were none of her enemies in WWII she left it in ghe capable hands of Cap't American and Wolverine.

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Plus, we see World War II as the setting for so many movies, it was nice to set it in World War I for a change.

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On 7/20/2021 at 10:08 AM, crocodile said:

 there's something tasteless about setting this story against a real world catastrophic event.

 

Hmmmm. You eliminate either of the World Wars (or any war or "catastrophic event" for that matter) as a backdrop, even setting aside the "war film" genre itself, you get rid of a huge chunk of great cinema.

 

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4 hours ago, Nick1Ø66 said:

 

Hmmmm. You eliminate either of the World Wars (or any war or "catastrophic event" for that matter) as a backdrop, even setting aside the "war film" genre itself, you get rid of a huge chunk of great cinema.

 

You do realise I am talking about this specific film, right? 

 

Karol

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Hmm, you answered Nick's question but ignored mine :(

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10 minutes ago, Jay said:

Hmm, you answered Nick's question but ignored mine :(

Ah sorry. Missed it. I just sort of knew from the outset that she will have to both learn the lesson about real world but also find the literal Ares. And these two things sort of cancel each other out. It trivialises the real world complexity and simultaneously takes the silly mythological elements way too seriously. But this is the only the story could have gone. But you also already know, what kind of lessons she is going to learn. Which makes the film really long as you need to wait for Diana to catch up. This is simply dull storytelling. 

 

And yes, the second one is just as heavy-handed. But at least it doesn't drag mass genocide into its silly premise.

 

Karol

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You're saying we the viewer already know about wars and that mankind is inherently war-driven, and she has to learn that?  Or something else?

Sorry, you're not really fully explaining what you said and like I said, I barely remember the film, so don't have the details fresh in my mind like you do

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42 minutes ago, crocodile said:

You do realise I am talking about this specific film, right? 

 

Karol

 

I do. But my point remains. Your suggestion (at least a far as I can tell) seems to be because it's a superhero movie, the subject matter is too frivolous to have such a horrific event as WWI as the backdrop. And again, this happens all the time in cinema, not just with war, but natural disasters, plagues, etc. Real people die in those kinds of events, but we still make comedies, sci-fi, mindless action films, and yes, superhero movies using these catastrophes as a backdrop. Even the most serious subjects, like the Holocaust, appear in all kinds of genre films. Look at Magneto's background in X-Men.

 

The same goes true for the use of Nazi's as villains, and I suppose you could argue that it was in bad taste to use them as the villains in Indiana Jones, but I'm glad they did.

 

 

 

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52 minutes ago, Jay said:

You're saying we the viewer already know about wars and that mankind is inherently war-driven, and she has to learn that?  Or something else?

Sorry, you're not really fully explaining what you said and like I said, I barely remember the film, so don't have the details fresh in my mind like you do

My point is there are no surprises or discoveries for the viewer. You're being treated like a child. 

 

46 minutes ago, Nick1Ø66 said:

 

I do. But my point remains. Your suggestion (at least a far as I can tell) seems to be because it's a superhero movie, the subject matter is too frivolous to have such a horrific event as WWI as the backdrop. And again, this happens all the time in cinema, not just with war, but natural disasters, plagues, etc. Real people die in those kinds of events, but we still make comedies, sci-fi, mindless action films, and yes, superhero movies using these catastrophes as a backdrop. Even the most serious subjects, like the Holocaust, appear in all kinds of genre films. Look at Magneto's background in X-Men.

 

The same goes true for the use of Nazi's as villains, and I suppose you could argue that it was in bad taste to use them as the villains in Indiana Jones, but I'm glad they did.

Not the same thing. Indiana Jones films don't moralise and therefore don't simplify. But when you attempt to tell something more profound you're in the shit. It is neither helpful nor insightful. In X:Men films sthere is an attempt at least to explore different philosophies and there's bit more substance to it. Not so with WW.

 

Again, it's not the idea itself that bothers me. It's how it plays out in this particular movie. 

 

Karol

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I actually heard someone who's opinions I usually respect who objected to the beginning of X-men. He didn't feel a Nazi death camp should be in a superhero movie. 

 

I'm sure there are exceptions, but I disagree. Holocaust survivors have been used in any number of fictional settings. (And this was a person who loved To Be Or Not To Be.) 

 

Heck, I object more to Captain America talking the Nazis out of WWII just so they could market the movie overseas. 

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6 hours ago, Tallguy said:

I actually heard someone who's opinions I usually respect who objected to the beginning of X-men. He didn't feel a Nazi death camp should be in a superhero movie. 

It instantly gives Magneto more depth and makes the audience more confused about rooting for him or not!

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10 hours ago, crocodile said:

Again, it's not the idea itself that bothers me. It's how it plays out in this particular movie. 

 

Karol

 

Fair enough. :up:

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12 hours ago, crocodile said:

I just sort of knew from the outset that she will have to both learn the lesson about real world but also find the literal Ares. And these two things sort of cancel each other out. It trivialises the real world complexity and simultaneously takes the silly mythological elements way too seriously.

 

Even big fans of that movie tend to not like the Ares reveal at the end, although to be fair I don't think it entirely negates the film's themes because it is made clear in Ares' dialogue that humans have the capacity for needless in-fighting regardless of his prodding.

 

And I've been craving for a half-decent superhero film that takes its mythological elements seriously for a change, so...

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Minority report. 

 

I tried to watch this years ago, but had to give up because the audio-describer was really bad. Now that an official description has come out, I decided to try again and this time I didn’t turn it off. The actors were all great, but most especially Tom Cruise and Samantha Morton. I didn’t really like John’s first chase sequence, though, and found both Hineman and that guy who changed his eyes unnecessarily scary. Or rather, I suddenly felt as though this was Temple of Doom for five minutes. Weird. Also, there’s a huge plot hole: if John hasn’t got a minority report, how come he managed to alter his future? Or was he never going to commit the crime in the first place because Agatha would always be there to guide him? But if that’s the case, why did she predict the crime to begin with? Or did she just want him to bring down the system? The twist at the end was nice and I will now finally remember who Max von Sydow is, but both Agatha’s story about Sean (whose ending I still don’t get) and especially the rushed epilogue were overly sentimental and felt out of place too.

The DreamWorks logo has great music and I loved the classical music, but am a bit confused as to why it needs to accompany pre-crime preparations. I will track down the piece, though. The action cues are predictable, but the celesta (and organ?) at the beginning of the score was great and I loved the more futuristic material, some of which reminded me of James Horner. Is this JW’s first use of a wailing woman? Did MM ever give an interview about the LLL release?

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18 minutes ago, bollemanneke said:

Also, there’s a huge plot hole: if John hasn’t got a minority report, how come he managed to alter his future? Or was he never going to commit the crime in the first place because Agatha would always be there to guide him? But if that’s the case, why did she predict the crime to begin with? Or did she just want him to bring down the system?

 

Normally, the the future is "altered" when the pre-cogs see a murder that "will" happen, and the Pre-Crime unit figures it out properly and gets there in time to stop it.

 

This time, the pre-cogs saw a murder that also "will" happen (Anderton killing Leo Crow), but Anderton became aware that it was all a setup, so didn't do it.  Either way, it's sort of the same thing; knowing about a thing before it happens enables a changing of the thing.

 

And yea, Agatha is special, and knew that Sydow had killed her mom but couldn't exactly explain it but could somehow lead Anderton to figure it out... I think

 

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Agatha’s story about Sean (whose ending I still don’t get) and especially the rushed epilogue were overly sentimental and felt out of place too.

 

Overly sentimental endings and rushed endings are a Spielberg trademark, especially in this era of his career (see also: War of the Worlds)

 

Sean's story is simply that he was abducted as a child from the public pool and that's it.  Sydow hired Leo Crow to fake that he was behind it.

 

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I loved the classical music, but am a bit confused as to why it needs to accompany pre-crime preparations.

 

Maybe the audio descriptor didn't make it clear, but it's Anderton's personal choice.  He puts it on in the room to listen to while he is doing his thing; It's not necessarily something anyone else doing the same job would do

 

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I will track down the piece, though.

 

The first one is Symphony No 8 Mvt I by Schubert

 

The second one is Symphony No 6 Mvt II by Tchaikovsky

 

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 Is this JW’s first use of a wailing woman?

 

I think so

 

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Did MM ever give an interview about the LLL release?

 

Yea https://thelegacyofjohnwilliams.com/2019/12/11/mike-matessino-podcast-disaster-soundtrack-collection/

 

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Thanks!

 

No, the describer didn't mention that that was his music, probably because the characters were nearly always talking and there was little time to give extra info.

 

As for Sean's story, I was referring to what Agatha was telling them: something about how he gets married, but then still can't catch up to his dad running or something? It didn't make much sense.

 

Very excited to hear MM talk about this now.

 

 

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3 minutes ago, bollemanneke said:

No, the describer didn't mention that that was his music, probably because the characters were nearly always talking and there was little time to give extra info.

 

If I remember correctly, the first time there's a quick shot of him putting some sort of future mini-CD looking thing into a player to make it clear it's music he's putting on in the room to listen to.

 

Williams tailored the score cue "Creating The Red Balls" to end just before the first classical piece, and "Stopping The Crime" (aka "Pre-Crime To The Rescue") to pick up right after.  The second time there's not real interplay between the classical piece and the surround score cues, possibly due to Spielberg re-editing the film and moving the scene of Witwer in Anderton's apartment to a different spot, and deleting a whole scene of Anderton running into another roadblock on his way to the elevator

 

Quote

As for Sean's story, I was referring to what Agatha was telling them: something about how he gets married, but then still can't catch up to his dad running or something? It didn't make much sense.

 

She was like imaging what his life could have been like if he wasn't abducted, if I remember correctly.  Basically giving Anderton a happy memory to cling on to or something like that

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MV5BNDg1NjYyMTEyOF5BMl5BanBnXkFtZTgwNzY4

 

Gosh, I seem to be immune to anything 'Nordic'. The raw and dreary tone is so forced and artificial. It's like everyone does exactly what Nordic recipe book dictates. But worst of all is the The Snowman's predictability. I immediately knew who the killer was and that can't be a good thing for a detective movie. 3/10

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Gotta wonder how bad the names for Jo Nesbo's protagonist that he came up with then rejected were before he settled on 'Harry Hole'  :eh: .  

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2 hours ago, Sweeping Strings said:

Harry Hole

lol

 

This is almost as bad as naming the character "Dick Johnson" or "Woody Schlongenstein"

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Then there's Rafto, played by Val kilmer, or what's left of him. They even had his voice dubbed by a different actor.

 

image.jpg

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The How Did This Get Made where they ripped into this movie was pretty good

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