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What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)


Mr. Breathmask
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The spotting is really weird. The first act is scored wall to wall and after that the film becomes quite sparse, music-wise. It wasn't really as "pushy" as many reviews stated.

I think the spotting was really well done. It is definitely partial to the mundane day-to-day action over the supposed glory of war. It's eery how little music there is during the war scenes relative to the rest of the film.

I agree. The spotting is certainly unusual, but I think that is what makes it the more effective.

Yes and you really notice how the music just disappears after the first act and in a way takes away the comforting feel of safety and home with it. It is constantly lilting so warmly and lyrically during the first act of the film that when it suddenly is pulled out it reinforced the fact that we were moving to a new and darker place in the story. The homecoming at the end is more powerful because the music and safety returns, the score coming a full circle as it were.
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The film is a huge success with audiences, apparently. A future classic, even. I was listening to some commercial radio station and they were talking about the month's movies and War Horse was (surprisingly) voted best on release. They had people, teenagers in particular, calling in to say how "brilliant" and "amazing" it was. Girls were falling over themselves to say how "sad" it was, how much they "cried". I was genuinely shocked to hear the enthusiasm for this oh so old fashioned breed of film, and pleased. Judged against that reaction at least, Spielberg has definitely still got his finger on the pulse.

I'll watch it on Blu-ray.

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War Horse. Can't say I was with the movie for the most part, but It is strangely inoffensive in its simplicity. So direct and old-fashioned that you have to admire Spielberg's audacity to release something like this in these cynical times.

I enjoyed it as sunday afternoon-turn-your-brain-off kind of stuff. But it's a rather daft movie, with a headscratcher of a storyline plus a bland main character (and i'm not talking about the horse) and when it's over you ask yourself how the Spielberg of MUNICH and WOTW could even think of pulpy scenes like the reunion scene in this WWI context without blushing with shame every shooting day.

Basically it's Spielberg playing Lean/Ford/Fleming in his shots (which are great) but doing so in aid of a story which seems not to understand what it is about...and desperatley turns to Hollywood mush. As such, it's a very entertaining film, though.

Girls were falling over themselves to say how "sad" it was, how much they "cried". I was genuinely shocked to hear the enthusiasm for this oh so old fashioned breed of film, and pleased. Judged against that reaction at least, Spielberg has definitely still got his finger on the pulse.

With TINTIN and WH, i think a point can be made he hasn't (at least box-office-wise). And while teenage girls may cry at the very obvious sadness machinations (think of the pencil scene in BEAUTIFUL MIND), it may become one of those undemanding holiday favourites, but a classic....forget it.

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Maybe. I haven't seen it, but time will tell.

My theory is its most mean spirited critics are perhaps the ones most 'out of touch' - with audiences - with the demand for comfort food in these miserable times. I reckon Spielberg hoped his 'uncool' approach might be embraced - he took a gamble and it paid off. Maybe he kept Shawshank close to mind when making it.

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Maybe. I haven't seen it, but time will tell.

Watch it, it is a great feast for the eyes (mine at least). But when it's over, you know it's more ALWAYS then E. T. (the freewheeling TINTIN feels much more genuine, somehow).

Maybe he kept Shawshank close to mind when making it.

Just watch it and then think again of ever mentioning WH and SHAWSHANK in the same sentence again.

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Looking only at the box office numbers in The States, The Shawshank Redemption wasn't a huge success ($28 million). War Horse ($78 million) isn't either, relatively speaking, of course.

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Oh I'm not suggesting it's as accomplished as Shawshank, but as far as I can tell there's a similar Capra-esque tone to War Horse.

Disclaimer: speculation on my part for the sake of discussion.

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The Color Purple

All I kept thinking the whole time is what a great score Williams would have composed for this. Jones and the 15 or so adaptors and orchestrators did some great work with the songs in the film, but the score is very generic. No theme, it sounds too upbeat when it shouldn't, and it just doesn't work. It's a great film, if a bit slow to start, and finally one that doesn't look overexposed and all warm and fuzzy. The shot of the African tribe going up the hill is amazing. Saving Private Ryan is the last Spielberg on Blu that I need to watch. I may revisit Close Encounters first, though. I want Catch Me If You Can, Munich, and Schindler's List. I think Empire Of The Sun is coming out soon.

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War Horse. Can't say I was with the movie for the most part, but It is strangely inoffensive in its simplicity. So direct and old-fashioned that you have to admire Spielberg's audacity to release something like this in these cynical times.

I enjoyed it as sunday afternoon-turn-your-brain-off kind of stuff. But it's a rather daft movie, with a headscratcher of a storyline plus a bland main character (and i'm not talking about the horse) and when it's over you ask yourself how the Spielberg of MUNICH and WOTW could even think of pulpy scenes like the reunion scene in this WWI context without blushing with shame every shooting day.

Basically it's Spielberg playing Lean/Ford/Fleming in his shots (which are great) but doing so in aid of a story which seems not to understand what it is about...and desperatley turns to Hollywood mush. As such, it's a very entertaining film, though.

That's a good way of putting it.

Karol

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I need to listen to The Color Purple. Quincy Jones has done some great work with the Count Basie Orchestra, but beyond that I'm not very familiar with him.

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If Williams was on board... imagine some like Amistad and Rosewood combined. :john:

My two least favorite Williams scores.

That is a shallow and racist comment Alex!
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If Williams was on board... imagine some like Amistad and Rosewood combined. :john:

My two least favorite Williams scores.

That is a shallow and racist comment Alex!

That is a shallow and racist comment Incy!

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If Williams was on board... imagine some like Amistad and Rosewood combined. :john:

My two least favorite Williams scores.

That is a shallow and racist comment Alex!

That is a shallow and racist comment Incy!

That is a shallow and particularly racist comment, Quincy!

Karol

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Not at all. Now if Williams was black ... then maybe you have a point.

So you hate blacks? And would hate JW if he were one of them?

"One of them"? Is that how you refer to black people?

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Not at all. Now if Williams was black ... then maybe you have a point.

So you hate blacks? And would hate JW if he were one of them?

"One of them"? Is that how you refer to black people?

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The Ghost Writer: Now that was a satisfying thriller. Nice slow burning mystery and a wonderful ending to boot. Great performances from the whole cast with a lot of subtle work from all involved. Polanski got a really great ensemble for this one. Eli Wallach was a nice surprise in his small role. The whole viewing was an immersive experience and Desplat's music added quite sophisticated unease and suspence to it all.

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I thought The Ghost Writer was okay, but I didn't feel like it was exceptional in any way. The ending was kind of dumb.

Why wouldn't he have gone to the police instead of confronting her directly?

It seemed anticlimactic.

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I thought The Ghost Writer was okay, but I didn't feel like it was exceptional in any way. The ending was kind of dumb.

Why wouldn't he have gone to the police instead of confronting her directly?

It seemed anticlimactic.

I thought the film was several notches better than some of the thriller fare we have had in the recent years.

And I think he knew he was over his head trying to bring her down. He wanted to let her know he knew before he tried to get away. Perhaps he would have tried to do something about Ruth and her CIA connections but he was literally hit by a car before he could do anything. Showing the police a couple of photos and the first word of each chapter would have accomplished nothing.

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Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close

I think the critics are being unfair to this one and the best picture nomination is deserved. Bullock, Sydow, and the kid actor all give remarkable performances. While hardly the most original idea, it's nicely executed and made me care about the characters.

Desplat's score was perfect and was definitely overlooked.

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Weekend. As someone described it already, it's a gay take on Linklater's Before Sunrise/Before Sunset. But probably even more natural and free-form. A really genuine, moving film with great acting and writing. That's as much as you can expect from micro-budget production. I was surprised by how much I liked it.

Karol

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Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close

I think the critics are being unfair to this one and the best picture nomination is deserved. Bullock, Sydow, and the kid actor all give remarkable performances. While hardly the most original idea, it's nicely executed and made me care about the characters.

Desplat's score was perfect and was definitely overlooked.

Desplat and Von Sydow are great, the boy is atrocious and the film is a typical american tearjerker without any restraint or subtlety. Blech, sadly.

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Yes, it is average ... but it's the kind of average that I can dig. It feels like an adaptation of one of them cheap western magazines. Renée Zellweger didn't even bother me that much. Now if this film had a heavy or bloated tone to it and still turned out to be average, then I wouldn't be so forgiving. ;)

appaloosa-3.jpg

Alex

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