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What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)


Mr. Breathmask
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Rear Window - nice to finally see this Hitchcock classic. Interesting to note that whereas 60 years ago you needed a pair of binoculars and neighbours who conducted their domestic business with their blinds/curtains open to the world to be a voyeur, nowadays all you need is an account on a social network.

And wow, isn't the set amazing?

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Rear Window - nice to finally see this Hitchcock classic. Interesting to note that whereas 60 years ago you needed a pair of binoculars and neighbours who conducted their domestic business with their blinds/curtains open to the world to be a voyeur, nowadays all you need is an account on a social network.

And wow, isn't the set amazing?

next to Rope's set (or at least the set-up with the skyline) it's pretty damn impressive.

Imagine, nowadays to get Burr Stewart could've videoed it on his smartphone, texted it or something. No need to risk dear Gracie.

(and how about Miss Torso? I say)

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Yes, she was quite something Hilly. Also amusing was how although the restrictions of the time would never have allowed Hitch to show the grim aftermath of Burr's actions, there was nothing to stop Stewart's 'home help' from the insurance company speculating on the likes of on how long it would've taken him to wash the blood off the bathroom walls.

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Been trying to watch BASIC INSTINCT for over a week. Had to stop the movie two times, once because I was too tired to continue and the other I had errands. On paper this should be my kind of flick. Verhoeven directing, Jan de Bont's photography, Goldsmith score, Douglas as the lead, Sharon Stone flashing her pussy, ect. Still, this isn't really engaging me all that much so I never feel arsed to try finishing it. I'll finish it soon, but so far I'm not totally into it.

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madding1.jpg

FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD (1967; dir. by John Schlesinger)

One of my favourite films all time, with one of my favourite scores of all time, courtesy of Sir Richard Rodney Bennett. Hats off to Nicolas Roeg, Julie Christie, Peter Finch, Terence Stamp and Alan Bates, and of course, Thomas Hardy.

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It's easily Bay's best film, though I suspect that is only so because as his second feature he didn't have enough reign to really assert himself and his sensibilities. So it's more of a Bruckheimer production than a Bay film. Of those kind of films from the 90s, I like that and CRIMSON TIDE.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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Unknown: I was hoping for some kind of Taken, but alas, this one just sucks badly and with such extremely poor direction that it makes even Liam Neeson look like a bad actor. 1/10 (for Bruno Ganz)

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Alex

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Yes, it is.

E.T. is on TV and the image quality is really gorgeous in HD. My ordinary DVD looks bad in comparison. It's like it shot yesterday.

Alex

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Moonrise Kingdom

This is my second Wes Anderson film (the first being Fantastic Mr. Fox), so I'm hardly what you call an expert. But I really like this film. I love the camera-work, the well-crafted/well-shot sets, and the witty script. It really is a charming film. The music was of particular note! To credit Desplat with all that success would be unfair I think, considering he basically wrote one cue with variations that are littered in parts here and there. The bits of music he wrote were certainly effective, but the real hero of the music is Benjamin Britten, whose choral works among others are used intelligently to great effect by Wes Anderson. It helps create this world of its own for the film. Acting was top-notch from evreyone as well, with the exception of perhaps the girl, who sometimes just appeared to be a bit too lifeless.

I'm not sure if this is typical Wes Anderson, because if it is, call me a fan, one that is looking forward to seeingn Grand Budapest Hotel.

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I don't know about fake-looking, but I really loved the sets, the way he played with the colours and the way they're filmed. They look as if works of art are coming to life, which was the intention.

And the acting was great. I especially thought Edward Norton shined in the film.

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Are his older films like his new ones? I want to try The Royal Tenenbaums soon.

Not necessarily. I've been showing them to my girlfriend in reverse order since we both saw The Grand Budapest Hotel last weekend. Had to skip The Life Aquatic as Criterion's blu isn't out for 2 more months.

While Moonrise Kingdom and Grand Budapest are both fantastic films, I feel like they aren't entirely true to his style. Don't get me wrong they are 100% Anderson but the scale seems to be growing exponentially in that his characters are becoming diluted. Particularly with Budapest, none of the characters are fleshed out aside from the two leads. Stuff like The Royal Tenenbaums and The Darjeeling Limited have a more natural pace and feel to them that I relate to more. Each has its own identity while his last two films are more of a giant melting pot of everything that came before.

I was also bummed that it didn't have a slow mo shot.

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I've never seen a Wes Anderson movie.

Rich

I've tried, but his films put me off. Bottle Rocket was pretty decent, but a lot of his films nowadays -- which tend to revolve around wealthy people with problems or insufferable quirks -- I can't relate to that mindset. (As well as the precocious children in Moonrise Kingdom.) And as a fan of Roald Dahl's "The Fantastic Fox", I thought Anderson missed the point of the book entirely.

A lot of the high-profile U.S. art-house pics with name talent just don't deliver for me. I'll take Before Sunrise over any of Anderson's films any day.

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That's where we differ. I find the BEFORE [insert Time of Day] films insufferably smug, over-written, bland, self-absorbed and insincere. I do not care about some narcissistic, half-educated, pious, middle-class couple who wear their affectations on their sleeves and can't keep their gobs shut. A binge watch of those three films would be movie hell for me.

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I was also bummed that it didn't have a slow mo shot.

Urgh really? You also bummed out that he changed fonts?

Those are small, cosmetic changes. Overall his style is very much the same.

I'm not saying his style his different, that just happens to be a part of it I enjoy. Relax.

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That's where we differ. I find the BEFORE [insert Time of Day] films insufferably smug, over-written, bland, self-absorbed and insincere. I do not care about some narcissistic, half-educated, pious, middle-class couple who wear their affectations on their sleeves and can't keep their gobs shut. A binge watch of those three films would be movie hell for me.

(Y)

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Watched my entire LoveFilm batch this weekend:

The Conjuring - well directed and a perfect cast. I really like this genre, but it also demonstrates you don't need to do anything new to scare the viewer.

Flight - the twist was more legal/ethically-based than the plot synopsis had led me to believe (I was expecting a more 'mystery' type of plot) but very enjoyable nonetheless.

Hannibal - awesome. Thoroughly gripped for the entire 2 hours, and loved Zimmer's music. Not one of Zimmer's better albums in terms of finding favourite bits from the film, and it has the biggest offence of them all: dialogue. (cue Koray to jump to the rescue and point out that someone else put the dialogue on... I don't care who did it.)

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That's where we differ. I find the BEFORE [insert Time of Day] films insufferably smug, over-written, bland, self-absorbed and insincere. I do not care about some narcissistic, half-educated, pious, middle-class couple who wear their affectations on their sleeves and can't keep their gobs shut. A binge watch of those three films would be movie hell for me.

Funny, that's exactly how I feel about most of Anderson's films. I'll grant that he has a beautiful visual style throughout his works, but they don't connect with me plot-wise.

We'll just have to agree to disagree. I don't feel like starting a flame war...

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I actually agree with you on THE FANTASTIC MR. FOX, though. It's definetely the weakest of Anderson's films - he's got the wrong sensibility for Dahl. Edgar Wright might have done it justice.

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