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What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)


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Star Wars: Episode VIII - The Last Jedi.   I love how character based this is. All of our main characters experience an emotional journey and growth in this movie. And do so often by, screwi

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Temple of Doom

 

Fun as all hell.

 

It's so insanely refreshing to hear a big, unapologetic, fun action/adventure score reacting to the picture, virtually unedited. I noticed maybe 3 or 4 microedits in 2 hours. This of course leads to all the other aspects as well: this is a director at the top of his game, knowing exactly what he wants his movie to be, what to shoot, how to shoot it, who to hire to make it happen, and everyone clearly having enormous fun doing it, to hell with the later "damage control" in interviews, "I was in a dark place" etc.

Raiders had a great concept and lots of really neat bits, but I feel this is a much more clearly and coherently envisioned and realised vision.

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1 hour ago, Koray Savas said:

Tin-Tin is bottom tier Spielberg. 

 

I wouldn't say that, but - as I've heard it said elsewhere - "when a movie is directed by Steven Spielberg, Produced by Sir Peter Jackson, written by Edgar Wright and Stephen Moffat and features Andy Serkis and Daniel Craig - it should  be better than Tintin."

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I guess that's the problem, people were expecting a new Raiders of the Lost Ark, and then they were inevitably disappointed. 

 

Sure, the movie should've been better, and as I said, it's not without its flaws. But I can appreciate it from what it is.

 

That said, Tintin is not the best "animation with cutting edge technology from a famous live action director" from that year. That title went to Rango.

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4 hours ago, Naïve Old Fart said:

 

 

 

WATCH IT!!!!!

It's not only a "milestone of world cinema", it's among the greatest films ever made.

As for the length...who cares?

SCHINDLER'S LIST 3hrs 15mins,

APOCALYPSE NOW REDUX 3hrs 15mins,

JFK 3hrs 15mins,

THE RETURN OF THE KING (EE) 4hrs,

BEN-HUR 3hs 45mins,

CLEOPATRA 4hrs,

THE GODFATHER PT. 2

3hrs 15mins,

DANCES WITH WOLVES (EE) 4hrs,

STALKER 3hrs,

SOLYARIS 3hrs.

Length is not important.

Personally, I like long films, as you can see from the above list.

yeah, i also love some very long films, but I meant that given its subject i wasn't sure I could watch a film of such length.

 

So, it turns out i avoided this film like the plague for years, and.......I was right.

It did absolutely nothing to me. i was bored to death, also i slept for half an hour during the 3rd hour (:blush:).

I wonder if i should watch Ran or Yojimbo or something but I'm afraid the results will be the same.

(I had watched Kurosawa's High and Low and remember liking that very much)

 

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2 hours ago, SteveMc said:

... with villains that don't feel very rounded, and he got sidetracked completely in the second half with the totally banal Las Vegas stuff and Harrison Ford appearance that has the weight of a cameo, but leans on nostalgia as Deckard's point of view begins to replace Ks without proper audience preparation for it.  

 

Absolutely right! Finally someone agrees with me on these points. I also didn't like the Deckard-daughter scene, nor the whole idea behind it. It's a bit too Spielbergy for me. Other than these points, it's a movie that I don't particularly like or hate. 2/4

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6 hours ago, filmmusic said:

Has anyone seen Seven Samurai (1954)?

I'm about to watch it since it's considered a milestone of world cinema, but I don't generally like samurai films and.... 3,5 hours???

 

It's a film where you don't feel the length. It flows so smoothly...it's more about the dudes amassing a ragtag group and forming bonds along the way than a "samurai movie" per se.

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The Last Samurai had a better score, by Zimmer. Sure, it's just Gladiator + The Thin Red Line in a Japanese setting, but I love that score anyway. Hans' masterpiece.

 

I don't remember that much about Seven Samurai's score.

Please don't kill me.

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1 hour ago, Alexcremers said:

Absolutely right! Finally someone agrees with me on these points. I also didn't like the Deckard-daughter scene, nor the whole idea behind it. It's a bit too Spielbergy for me. Other than these points, it's a movie that I don't particularly like or hate. 2/4

 

Garrett Stiger reviewed it to the same effect:

 

Quote

Once Harrison Ford shows up, it all goes downhill. (Ford himself is pretty great, even better than he was in the original.)

 

I'm still wrestling with Deckard and Rachel's relationship being the lynchpin of this film. They go off together, yes, at the end of the first film, but Deckard's not good to her. It feels like an odd choice.

 

The action climax is wholly underwhelming and poorly staged. There are a number of cutaways to Ford, handcuffed to a hovercraft that's slowly sinking, and he looks...mildly perturbed.

 

I can't help but wonder if "Blade Runner 2049" would have been better served if it had more fully been K's story, if it weren't so shrouded in the shadow of its predecessor.

 

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4 hours ago, Alexcremers said:

I also didn't like the Deckard-daughter scene, nor the whole idea behind it. It's a bit too Spielbergy for me.

Felt like it came out of nowhere and clashed too much with the tone of the film.  Better if the movie left their reunion implied, and ended with K's death.

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The living daylights.

 

After two and a half years, I decided it was time to be shaken and stirred again. Timothy Dalton is annoying and it took a long time before Maryam d'Abo grew on me, but Caroline Bliss and Julie T. Wallace were great. Good story too. Exactly what you’d expect from a Bond film, for better or for worse, but some parts were a little rushed.

The song and score are fantastic, especially the action cues. Derivative, yes, but I could feel John Barry was doing his best to be original at the same time and liked it too.
 

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Pan’s Labyrinth (2006)

 

DD8B085F-BA1A-4592-85DD-060B7D05AAA7.jpeg

 

An engrossing and haunting fantasy/war film from Guillermo del Toro. There’s a lot to appreciate here; I really loved the visuals and especially the creature effects; del Toro is a master of striking and imaginative imagery, and it really shows here. Fine performances all around; I really liked Ivana Baquero as the heroine Ophelia, and Sergi Lopez was excellent as the truly despicable Captain Vidal. Overall I enjoyed it a lot, and there are many scenes that will stick with me for some time. Definitely worth a watch!
 

4 and 1/2 stars out of 5

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I just watched that today as well - had only seen it once before, years ago on DVD. I mostly agree with your comments. What bothered me a bit the first time, and again this time,  was the seemingly ambiguous ending, simple because I don't think it's the type of film that benefits from an ambiguous ending,. Also, there are parts of it that don't really make sense unless the ending is taken literally - yet it still gave me that "this is intentionally ambiguous" vibe at the end. But apparently del Toro did in fact intend it to be taken literally, so I'm more satisfied now.

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39 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

It’s really not that ambiguous. In an unbroken shot, we see the maze shifting to allow Ofelia to flee Vidal, so it CAN’T be in her head.

 

There are instances like this before, e.g. the chalk door she uses to escape her room. But the "fantasy" scene at the end still has a sort of surreal hallucination feel to it. And lapses in logic/continuity do happen in films and are not always a clear indication for one or another kind of interpretation (and not necessarily apparent when watching something for the first time).

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1 hour ago, Marian Schedenig said:

 

There are instances like this before, e.g. the chalk door she uses to escape her room. But the "fantasy" scene at the end still has a sort of surreal hallucination feel to it. And lapses in logic/continuity do happen in films and are not always a clear indication for one or another kind of interpretation (and not necessarily apparent when watching something for the first time).

It’s been awhile since I’ve seen the film, but my understanding is that everything was a coping mechanism for her real life. Wasn’t it all fantasy?

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5 hours ago, Þekþiþm said:

The Conversation

Marathon Man

Serpico

Pokemon: Detective Pikachu

Sonic the Hedgehog

Ladies in Black

1941

Amistad

Hunter Killer

K19: The Widowmaker

 

The first three make for a good Seventies retrospective. 

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11 hours ago, Koray Savas said:

It’s been awhile since I’ve seen the film, but my understanding is that everything was a coping mechanism for her real life. Wasn’t it all fantasy?

 

That's what I'm saying: It certainly gives off that impression. But it doesn't seem satisfying to me in the context of this film, and it disagrees with several moments that suggest it's actually real. Plus, according to IMDb:

 

According to his interview with twitchfilm.net, Guillermo Del Toro said that the fantasy world isn't only Ofelia's imagination; the fantasy world does exist. In the ending, Ofelia does actually live in the world (where she would be more happy to live in than the real world).

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6675196-16x9-940x529.jpg

 

Picnic at Hanging Rock

 

Sumptuously shot, seductively eerie with a killer ending. It's easy to see why this film has such a devout following. There are spots where its age shows, but it still manages to deliver chills.

 

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Murder on the orient express, 2017.

 

Kenneth Branagh isn’t the best Poirot. Why didn’t he research how you pronounce ‘eggs’ in French and, honestly, it’s not that difficult to say ‘monsieur’ either. Judi Dench was a necessary evil and Johnny Depp was fantastic, as was Michelle Pfeiffer. I only recognised Daisy Ridley after an hour for some reason and Oliva Colman and Lucy Boynton escaped my notice altogether. The entire plot is also far-fetched, but that doesn’t mean I didn’t enjoy the movie.

Patrick Doyle’s intimate cues were great, but the action cues could have been more.

 

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8 hours ago, Marian Schedenig said:

That's what I'm saying: It certainly gives off that impression. But it doesn't seem satisfying to me in the context of this film, and it disagrees with several moments that suggest it's actually real. Plus, according to IMDb:

I feel like that would betray the pathos of the film. Either way, she passes in the end so does she exist in both realties? I prefer to view it more literally. That’s why I never liked Life Of Pi as a novel, because it explores the same juxtaposition, but heavily suggests that it is all real anyway. 

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11 hours ago, KK said:

6675196-16x9-940x529.jpg

 

Picnic at Hanging Rock

 

Sumptuously shot, seductively eerie with a killer ending. It's easy to see why this film has such a devout following. There are spots where its age shows, but it still manages to deliver chills.

 

 

The key scene which depicts the vanishing incident itself is one of the most positively uncanny things I've ever seen in a film. The photography throughout the film is distinctly ethereal and dreamlike, but the lesser mentioned sound design deserves just as much kudos and attention. The score too is stunningly evocative, bordering at times on the weirdly erotic.

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On 3/21/2020 at 1:09 AM, Chen G. said:

It’s really not that ambiguous. In an unbroken shot, we see the maze shifting to allow Ofelia to flee Vidal, so it CAN’T be in her head.

So it's supposed to be either real or her fantasy? That sounds like you've never heard of a meta level in film.

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In The Line Of Fire - classy thriller with Clint Eastwood's veteran Secret Service agent (haunted by the fact that he failed to protect JFK from assassination) taunted by John Malkovich's wackjob, who is threatening to assassinate the current President. Eastwood and Malkovich are both great, and the high-calibre supporting cast includes Rene Russo, John Mahoney, Dylan McDermott and Gary Cole.    

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Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

 

I love movies with a dream-like atmosphere. This one makes sure the atmosphere is more than a little off, with a lot of voice-over, to make sure we experience a film like an influx of memories. It's like we're experiencing a person reflecting, and not a structured movie (although it IS a structured movie, with brilliant editing, directing, acting and screenwriting to achieve this effect).

 

Besides the movies of David Lynch (of which I love Mulholand Drive) and Malick, do you guys recommend any more movies with this dreamy atmosphere? On which the reality seems like it's on the mind of some character? I really like atmospheric movies.

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NUzJxWv.jpg

 

The Piano Teacher

 

A fascinating portrait of the unravelling of a woman who's used to being in control. Huppert's face oozes so much toxic repression that you get lost in that itself, and Haneke knows it. The director's stark, static lens refuses to cut away and provide any relief from the self-destructive behaviour of its characters. And there's some fine Schubert tying it all together. It's a hard watch, but it's also hard to look away.

 

 

14 hours ago, Quintus said:

 

The key scene which depicts the vanishing incident itself is one of the most positively uncanny things I've ever seen in a film. The photography throughout the film is distinctly ethereal and dreamlike, but the lesser mentioned sound design deserves just as much kudos and attention. The score too is stunningly evocative, bordering at times on the weirdly erotic.

 

Indeed. The score was absolutely indispensable to the whole thing.

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6 hours ago, KK said:

NUzJxWv.jpg

 

The Piano Teacher

 

A fascinating portrait of the unravelling of a woman who's used to being in control. Huppert's face oozes so much toxic repression that you get lost in that itself, and Haneke knows it. The director's stark, static lens refuses to cut away and provide any relief from the self-destructive behaviour of its characters. And there's some fine Schubert tying it all together. It's a hard watch, but it's also hard to look away.

 

 

That is one of the most grim movies that I've ever seen. It's all yin and no yang which is always a hard thing for me to swallow. 

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